Don't Be Fooled: The Future of Offense Is Simplicity

With Stanford, it’s easy to see where NFL attacks are headed. While it may look complex, it's anything but. Plus, I answer your Mailbag questions

Stanford's Kevin Hogan gets the offense set against Army.
Stanford’s Kevin Hogan gets the offense set against Army. (Frank DiBrango/Icon SMI)

WEST POINT, N.Y. — The future of offensive football doesn’t have to be no-huddle, and it doesn’t have to be breakneck. It just has to be varied, and it has to put thoughtful pressure on the defense. It has to be the next move in the chess game. “A philosophy of probing,’’ Stanford coach David Shaw says here, after the Stanford-Army game on Saturday. “Probing, and wondering, ‘How is the defense going to react to this?’ ‘’

We’re living in a great time for offensive football. Here on the banks of the Hudson on a glorious Saturday for college football, one team, undermanned Army, ran the triple option, where the quarterback can hand to a big back, run himself or pitch to a trailer. The other team, Stanford, ran everything. Such as:

• A pro style shotgun, with one back, one tight end and three wideouts.

• A pro style I, with two backs, two wideouts and a tight end.

• An empty-backfield shotgun, with four wides and a tight end.

• A pistol (the shorter version of the shotgun) with sidecar backs on either side of quarterback Kevin Hogan and three wides.

• A pistol, with one back, two wides, and a tight end and slot tight end next to each other.

• A heavy formation, with three tight ends and two backs.

• The Weird Wildcat (my words, not Shaw’s): a back taking the snap, three tight ends, and a guard, 316-pound Joshua Garnett, as another (slot) tight end to demolish anything in his path.

• A classic old-time power I, with three backs and two tight ends. (Get the point? David Shaw loves the tight end.)

• And something I don’t know what to call: Before the snap, the tackle, tight end and slot tight end shifted to the right (sort of what Chip Kelly did at Washington in Week 1) to create a huge gap outside the guard.

“I’m going to quote my old boss, Jon Gruden,’’ Shaw said, standing in a tunnel outside the Stanford locker room after the 34-20 win over Army. Shaw was a Raiders quality control coach under Gruden for three years, and Rich Gannon’s quarterback coach in his fourth year with Gruden, 2001. “He would say it every single day: ‘What you want to do on offense is present the illusion of sophistication but all in all remain very simple and basic.’ So very often we’ll throw a whole bunch of different stuff at them, but we’re going to run a basic day-one installation play. Something we’ve run thousands of times. Something very, very simple. But for the defense, it looks very complicated. So we want to present these illusions, then run a regular play that we just want to execute right.’’

Shaw was happy to run some heavy-protection packages but still score out of them. Out of the power I with Hogan under center, Stanford sent only two receivers out on one play. Both backs simply acted as extra protection for Hogan, and, with eight kept in to block, the fleet Ty Montgomery beat double-coverage and caught a 46-yard touchdown pass in stride. Same thing later, with a little more illusion. Keeping seven in to block with Hogan in the pistol, Stanford had wideout Kelsey Young motion in from the right and follow running back Tyler Gaffney out of the backfield in a double-wheel-route concept up the left sideline. Army, confused, covered only one of them, and Gaffney caught an easy 23-yard touchdown.

On this day, the Cardinal ran 56 plays, and you never looked out on the field and said, “I’ve never seen that before.” (Well, the double-wheel thing maybe; that was unusual.) The formations and movement were offputting at times. But the plays, no. Watch the Eagles, under new coach Chip Kelly. Lots of misdirection and quarterback movement and some of the strangest formations you’ve seen, but watch the plays themselves. “This is not a difficult offense,’’ Mike Vick said in training camp.

“That’s why I love Chip Kelly,’’ Shaw said. “He knows that I love him. He used to say it all the time and no one would believe him. He would just laugh, one of those smirk laughs that he has, and he would always tell people, ‘What we’re doing is not hard. We’re doing it faster, and we’re doing it with big kids who are smart kids.’ We’re like that—changing formations, making our players communicate, communicate, and the ball is getting snapped and they’re running something very simple. Now, with Chip, he gets the ball to DeSean Jackson in space, he gets LeSean McCoy in space, he’s created the same thing. So it’s not just schemes, it’s the combination of schemes and personnel. If you’ve got the guys to do it, to get guys in space, you can make big plays.’’

(Jon Gruden) would say it every single day. ‘What you want to do on offense is present the illusion of sophistication, but all in all remain very simple and basic.’

Diversity is so important in offensive football—always has been. Illusion is too. In Week 1 against Green Bay, San Francisco offensive coordinator Greg Roman moved his physical wideout, Anquan Boldin, everywhere—in the two slots and two wide sides at least 10 times apiece. He ran him out of bunch formations. He set sort-of legal picks for him. And Boldin caught the ball 13 times for 208 yards. On Sunday night, with the Seahawks determined to beat Boldin up and nullify him at Seattle, the noise and defense conspired to take Boldin out of the game, and Colin Kaepernick could never find another weapon to replace him.

In Philadelphia, it’s going to be interesting to see if Kelly can keep Michaek Vick healthy. He’s on pace to run 120 times and to be sacked another 32 times, and it’s unlikely he’ll make it through the season taking that kind of punishment at 218 pounds. Running an uptempo offense, with a quarterback getting hit a lot, could require a second and maybe third quarterback to play this year, and though Nick Foles is, I’m told, very much a Kelly favorite, who knows how that offense changes with a quarterback who will stay home more.

Stanford has a stay-at-home big quarterback like Foles. Hogan is smart, like Foles. I don’t know how Foles would change what the Eagles do, but I do know a smart and accurate passer, without wheels, can still run it well. But with Vick or Foles, the Kelly offense will still be malleable. “There’s some really smart NFL guys that are going to sit on their hands and say let’s see what happens,’’ said Shaw. “Are they going to wear themselves out? This is a tempo and pace these guys are not used to. That’s the only question that I have. I love what they do; we’ve copied some of the things they do. But I believe every NFL player has a certain number of plays. And every time they run a play, you peel back. It’s like peeling back a day in the calendar. We’ll see.’’

Maybe the difference between Shaw and Kelly is that Shaw puts more of a premium on shielding his quarterback. It certainly appeared that way against Army—though, certainly, Hogan is not going to get the kind of pressure from a weak team like Army that he’ll get from Arizona State and Oregon. But the moral of the story from Shaw is the same as it is with the other smart young offensive minds infiltrating the NFL game: If you don’t like change in offensive football, you’re going to love irrelevance.

And now, for your mail …

MOVING TOO FAST. Is it not odd that in an era where player safety seems to be the buzz phrase zipping around, the league welcomes a coach who’s essentially turning up the speed of the game beyond what any player is used to? Grizzled vets who’ve known one speed since pee-wee ball are gulping air at the quarter’s end, thinking it’s halftime.  Exhaustion erases form, thereby making mistakes both more likely and more frequent.  Poor form on a tackle can lead to paralysis.

I like Chip Kelly’s style. I like seeing well-paid pros push the envelope. It’s part and parcel of the ways sport can inspire and improve us all. Just seems odd that the NFL, while touting safety on one hand, embraces what one would think is clearly increased risk with the other.

—Dave

How do you legislate the speed of the game? If a coach wants his QB to snap the ball with 18 seconds left on the play clock, do you propose to make that illegal? Do you propose to say that you can only run a certain number of snaps every game? Coaches are going to do what wins. If playing fast wins games for the Eagles, Kelly will keep doing it, the same way New England does it with Brady running a lot of no-huddle. Regarding safety, I just don’t know. It stands to reason that running more plays does increase the risk of injury. But I simply don’t think that you can legislate that a team should play at a certain pace.

On Coach Kill. I am a longtime reader of MMQB and have never written before, but your question about the University of Minnesota allowing Jerry Kill to coach football was insensitive. People in the workplace who have epilepsy are protected by the Americans with Disabilities Act. As a parent with a child who has epilepsy, I know the concerns about my son having seizures at work—he is a high school teacher and wrestling coach. Plain and simple, it is discrimination if his employer was to limit his ability to earn a living doing what he loves. The ADA requires his employer to make accommodations so that he can “enjoy equal employment opportunities.” As long as his doctor clears him for his duties, his employers would be in violation if they tried to remove him from his position for having seizures.

Tim, Ocala, Fla.

I’m simply asking the question about how practical it is to have a college football coach on the sideline or in a locker room, going down more than once a year, on average, with a seizurein full view of a television audience and a stadium full of fans. I’m not trying to be insensitive. I’m trying to be practical. It just seems the wrong job for that. Am I wrong? Probably. Am I being insensitive? Maybe I am.

schiano-freeman
Greg Schiano took the ball out of Josh Freeman’s hands at a key time in Sunday’s loss to New Orleans.

SCHIANO’S CALL. In analyzing Greg Schiano’s decision late in the game against the Saints [up 14-13, with 4th-and-3 at the Saints' 29], you left out perhaps his best option—going for the first down. If Tampa Bay makes it, the game is over. If Tampa Bay doesn’t make it, Brees still gets the ball back, but with slightly more yards to go to win the game than with the missed field goal. Still, the field goal was Schiano’s worst option. Even if Lindell (a shaky kicker in big moments—go back to Buffalo’s 2004 finale against Pittsburgh) makes the field goal, I’m not sure I bet against Brees going the length of the field for a touchdown in a minute.

Josh, Buffalo

Schiano obviously has zero faith in Josh Freeman to convert on fourth down there. My feeling is simple. It’s going to be pretty easy for Drew Brees to travel 35 yards with no timeouts and 60 seconds to get in field goal range. Now traveling 60 yards with no timeouts? That’s at least more of a challenge. But, I would agree that the best solution would be to have a quarterback you trust to convert on fourth down there. The Bucs don’t have that.

HOW LOUD IS TOO LOUD? Regarding the crowd noise in Seattle, I’ve served as the compliance officer for several companies in a couple of different industries. If the noise level reached 136.6 decibels or if sustained periods over 85 decibels were recorded in the workplace, the ownership of a company is required to have a hearing protection program that includes monitoring of employees who are exposed to such noise levels, implementation of engineering controls to reduce the noise exposure, provision of hearing protection if the engineering controls do not work, and training in hearing conservation for all employees. (OSHA’s Standards for Occupational Noise Exposure, 29 CFR 1910.95). We would also cover our backsides by providing hearing protection to all visitors to the workplace (e.g. the fans in Seattle). The only industry exempt from the standard is oil and gas. Any idea how major sports avoid this requirement?

Michael

Well, that extremely high noise level in Seattle is the peak; it doesn’t happen for a very sustained period. But I do understand your thought about the risk of extended exposure to loud noise. I guess what I would say is that what the fans in Seattle were subjected to is no louder than what kids are subjected to in, say, a metal concert. So I doubt you’re going to get a watchdog group to be very worried about fans being exposed to a loud stadium.

FINE FIFTEEN MATH. A week ago, Green Bay lost a very close game at San Francisco. You ranked San Fran No. 2 and Green Bay No. 6. This week Seattle took San Fran to the woodshed, and Green Bay blew out Washington. You dropped San Fran to No. 3 (behind Seattle) and Green Bay to No. 12. Now of course, I’m oversimplifying these games, but can you please explain how Green Bay dropped six places after blowing out Washington? If you believe home-field advantage is so important in Seattle, shouldn’t it carry at least some meaning in the San Francisco/Green Bay game that Packers came pretty close to winning that won on the Niners’ turf?

Nate

Each week I judge teams based on where I think they would rank if they were playing each other at a neutral field. I have very little respect for Washington right now. I don’t consider blowing out Washington much of an accomplishment. Their secondary stinks. So what has Green Bay accomplished so far? They lost a game to a really good team. They beat what could be a really bad team. I hardly think that for a team that still has major questions about its defense, which Green Bay certainly does, it’s outrageous to have them outside the top five or six teams. Plus, many other teams that have played well and proven something in the first two weeksSan Diego and Miami for instancemade big jumps in my eyes. I wouldn’t take it too seriously. If the Packers play great and straighten out their defense, they’ll be in the top five.

THANKS, MIKE. I wanted to follow up on my chance meeting with you this past Saturday while you were at the Army-Stanford game. I walked up to you while you were strolling along the reservoir in Black Knight Alley. I love your column. I am currently stationed at West Point, but during my previous assignment I deployed to Afghanistan multiple times. During football season, would spend late Monday nights reading your column. It at least helped me get through three to four months of the trip. Great Work!  Go Army

Mike, U.S. Army

Talk Back

Got a question for Peter? Send it to talkback@themmqb.com and it may be included in next Tuesday's mailbag.

I so appreciate you checking in with me and introducing yourself. You, and so many people like you, are the reason I have this great job. So I should thank you.

A.J. OVER JOHNNY. Despite the fact that I don’t regularly agree with your views, I do enjoy your column. What picked my noodle this weekend was your blatant disregard for the true MVP of the Alabama-Texas A&M game: ’Bama quarterback A.J. McCarron. I don’t get it. On one side you have  Johnny Football, a guy everyone hypes as the second coming. I saw him make bad throws and get rescued more often than not by his HUGE receivers, who were a clear mismatch for ‘Bama’s small corners. On the other side I saw a guy who tossed four TDs, drove the ball downfield when it counted, didn’t make mistakes and stayed calm in a pretty hostile environment. Not to mention that he actually won the game! But there’s no mention of A.J. McCarron in your column. Seriously Peter? Nothing?

Danny

When I watched that game, I saw a quarterback who fits in with 2013 NFL playa mobile guy with a good but not great arm who just put up 562 yards on the preeminent defensive mind of this college-football era. There’s no question A.J. McCarron has a chance to be a good NFL quarterback, and maybe a very good one. But he’s not the guy who’s moving the needle right now. Manziel isright or wrong. He’s the one who so many people right now are asking the same question about: is he going to be a good NFL quarterback, or is he going to be a guy who self-destructs right before our eyes?

50 comments
westcoastbias
westcoastbias

One error above: "Stanford has a stay-at-home big quarterback like Foles. Hogan is smart, like Foles."

...before he became the starter, Hogan was the Stanford RUNNING QB put in for special situations.  The guy is not Griffin or Kaepernick, but he's a little better than Luck as a runner IMHO.  He's not running much now, partly to protect him for a long season, but wait until the games against the better teams which count for more marbles.  He can, and will, run.

mikevoice1
mikevoice1

Redskins, Redskins, Redskins, Redskins, Redskins, Redskins you liberal slob PC Ahole! 

joe smith
joe smith

Nick Foles is smart....really? I love it. Its such lazy journalism to throw out traditional platitudes and hide behind stereotypes, if immobile, must be smart. If athletic, cant be smart......Really, really funny. Nick Foles has shown himself to be nothing but a backup but of course, "he's smart," Based on what? Let me guess, he reads defenses really well? Or the new favorite, "processes the information really fast." 


Eli Manning has thrown more interceptions(56) in the last 3 yrs than anyone in the NFL(that doesnt include the 6 he's thrown already this yr) but I hear repeatedly, how smart Eli is. If Eli was black, the reputation would be, "bad decision maker" or "trouble reading coverages." But if you look like Eli or in this case, Nick Foles, you're "smart."



Ciscos
Ciscos

Love it!

I probably never would have said that - rather revealed it in public, but it's certainly noticeable to anyone that studies film. If you keep it basic and don't over complicate your offense, nor your defense, you allow your players and play makers to do just that - make plays.  People say that Stanford just plays smash mouth football.  Yup they do.  There is nothing sophisticated about what they do at all.  To anyone that knows the game, that's pretty obvious.  However, therein lies the rub.  The difficulty is keeping it simple.  As a coach, the same way you can out-coach yourself, you can always and very easily out-scheme yourself as well.

evileyefleagle
evileyefleagle

Calling Kevin Hogan a stay-at-home quarterback like Nick Foles means Peter hasn't seen much of Stanford.

dunkmycat7
dunkmycat7

Peter King has become one of the most arrogant unreadable sports columnists alive..he is just SO impressed with himself...Every time I read this guy now I see he is more and more out of tune with what is really happening, and more self absorbed with his own opinion than ever. Which frankl,y is pretty hard for this guy..and guess what ?

it IS about the speed.

Run Forrest - RUN !!!

AndyM
AndyM

I think your comment about the coach with epilepsy is astoundingly off base. So- once, twice a year there is going to be an interruption in his ability to work. I could understand an employer not going for that, and I could understand an employer being ok with that based on everything else the man brings to the job. But to say this happens "In full view of the stadium" etc.... So what?  He should only have a seizure in solitary? What possible difference does that make???

SteveRowFla
SteveRowFla

A better take on the Kill story, from Wojo at the other network: 

FOURTH QUARTER

Minnesota coach Jerry Kill suffers from epilepsy -- a by-product of his successful battle against kidney cancer. It isn't a secret. It's never been a secret.

"We've dealt with the situation straight up," said Kill when he visited with us at ESPN shortly before the season began. "I wouldn't cheat the university. I've maybe missed five days of work [because of the condition]."

OK, make it six or seven after Kill suffered a seizure during halftime of Saturday's game against Western Illinois. He was taken to a local Minneapolis hospital and later was released so he could rest at home.

[+] EnlargeAP Photo/Ann HeisenfeltMinnesota coach Jerry Kill remains focused on turning the Golden Gophers around.

This isn't his first epileptic seizure and it won't be his last. But as the number of seizures slowly grow, so do the delicate questions about his future at Minnesota. In short, should he resign?

The answer, of course, is no. And Monday, Minnesota officials gave Killwhat Kill has given to Minnesota: its all. Golden Gophers athletic director Norwood Teague made it Waterford crystal clear when he said, "Jerry is our coach, and we are 100 percent behind him. I am 100 percent behind him."

The Minnesota administration has been supportive of Kill throughout these episodes. It is doing the right thing by judging Kill not by his epilepsy, but by his record, the quality of his work and his ability to graduate players.

Kill is a really good football coach. The occasional seizure doesn't change that fact and never will.

His doctor is one of the leading epileptic specialists in the world. Kill, in his third season at Minnesota, is eating better, sleeping longer, exercising more. Meanwhile, his treatment team continues to tinker with the doses and types of meds used to suppress the epilepsy.

"I've been able to deal with it pretty good," said Kill.

To suggest that he should quit because of the condition goes against everything he teaches his own players. Kill is fighting something he can't see, something he wouldn't wish on anybody. But he fights it without complaint and without asking for pity. It is a lesson in daily perseverance.

Someone once called him "a freak" in an email. Think about that: a freak -- as if the epilepsy were a choice, as if epilepsy gave someone the right to mock and criticize.

Minnesota is 3-0 this season. The program is headed in the right direction.

"I think we've laid the foundation to our program," Kill said back in August. "Now we're framing the house."

Kill is a grinder, a fighter and, if given the chance, a winner.

ronsweet99
ronsweet99

Please stop the Nick foles talk Peter  its embarrassing , Since you don't live down here , he is NOT going to be the long term fix here in philly , i watch the guy not only in practice but in preseason .. he is garbage, Which means he not the long term fix here, We are trying to get any takers in a sucker trade like we did with kolb.We are very  very very fortunate  VICK is here, because with out bad defense , you put foles or barkley in and we are not winning more than 2 games for the season .We actually would be 0-2 suffering from back to back  blowout losses.

Dana2
Dana2

Shanahan's '96 / '97 / '98 Superbowl Broncos (almost 20 years ago, peter) were a perfect exercise in simplicity disguised as complexity.

I remember one Oakland defensive coordinator lamenting the week before playing the Broncos that he was "preparing for the 'magic show' " - a fairly accurate description.

A basic number of plays, e.g. "Fox 3 run" - (also known as give Terrell Davis the ball and "one cut")

disguised by changes / differences in formation(s), 

much like a magician misdirects the audience's point of attention. 


It's hardly "new" - you and  Gruden might want to give Mike a call.

HeyVancouver
HeyVancouver

Peter ... please do not bore us again and take up valuable mailbox space with fans complaining about how you have ranked their team in your Fine 15 ... nothing is more tedious ... Thanks !!!

StevenMartino
StevenMartino

The University of Minnesota absolutely can question whether Jerry Kill's medical condition, disability or not, makes him unsuitable for the position. From the ADA itself, 42 USC 12113 - Defenses:

"It may be a defense to a charge of discrimination under this chapter that an alleged application of qualification standards, tests, or selection criteria that screen out or tend to screen out or otherwise deny a job or benefit to an individual with a disability has been shown to be job-related and consistent with business necessity, and such performance cannot be accomplished by reasonable accommodation, as required under this subchapter."

If his epilepsy prevents him from coaching all the football games, then it has a direct impact on his ability to perform the duties of his position. How could they possibly accommodate something as unpredictable as an epileptic seizure? Postpone the game until he feels better? I feel sorry for the guy, but to say that the University is simply required to deal with it is incorrect.

Tim59
Tim59

go fuck yourself peter king

Jon8
Jon8

The last I looked, that guy who writes this column, is not now, nor ever has been a Football coach and Jon Gruden is employed by ESPN!!

cottsb1
cottsb1

 "I hardly think that for a team that still has major questions about its defense, which Green Bay certainly does, it’s outrageous to have them outside the top five or six teams"

Then why were they No. 6 to begin with. You put them at 6 after a loss and at 12 after a win so maybe you can admit you were wrong the first week, not that the rankings mean anything at all anyway.

Wombat
Wombat

For those who have never had a seizure I can tell you that it is an embarrassing event for the individual but in no way limits what he or she can do. If Coach Kill is courageous enough to be that vulnerable in front of such a crowd then I would say that he is a great example of courage and perseverance for his players and their fans! You are in a position to showcase such things and instead you disparage... I just don't get it.

VIPOD4ever
VIPOD4ever

Jon Gruden (HC) + David Shaw (OC) = Oakland Raiders

With $60-70M in cap space come 2014, Reggie Mac can not waste this talent on a uninspiring coach like D.Allen. Can you imagine what David Shaw could do with talent like T.Pryor, DMC and M.Reece?

Rickapolis
Rickapolis

I always get a kick about the fuss over the 'Fine Fifteen'. Peter gets a lot of people's goats this week so they read next week to see if he 'got it right' this time. And that's the point. We keep coming back. I'm pretty sure he doesn't care if we are cursing his choices as long as we keep reading them. (The same with the political views). Some folks get very angry, yet they keep coming back. If they didn't we wouldn't be seeing their comments. I'm not criticizing anyone about that, I just think Peter King is smiling in his favorite beer or cup of coffee as he reads these comments. We keep coming back.

ken.burnside
ken.burnside

I was saying last year that everyone in the NFC owed Ken Whisenhunt a fruit basket.  Had Arizona not beaten Seattle in Week 1, Seattle would've had the #2 seed.

BY
BY

McCarron is a heck of a player, no doubt, but anybody who thinks McCarron could do with A&M what Manziel did is wrong. McCarron benefits from an outstanding line and tremendous defense, two areas where Alabama is clearly superior to A&M. I'm not really a fan of either team, just like football, and I don't get the bile directed at Manziel. A hell of a player in my opinion.

metalhead65
metalhead65

I do not understand all the "questions" about manziel and off field "difficulties". so far all I see is a normal college kid who likes to party, under age or not. all the other things that raise red flags occurred during his OFF season. let me know when he gets busted for beating his woman,gets a couple of dui's or is busted for drugs multiple times. those a red flags not going to frat party and drinking a beer. as for his in game show boating notice he did not do that against Alabama a tough team he respected. why should have to take crap from some losers in the first game he played and not be able to have a little fun? and you have to admit he must be pretty smart if can out smart the ncaa who were out to get him but could not prove anything other than he signed autographs.

BNick
BNick

Slight legal clarification - the ADA requires "reasonable" accommodation, not all demanded accommodations.  

SteveRowFla
SteveRowFla

"I’m trying to be practical. It just seems the wrong job for that".   Please apply your practicality to your liberal ideals, and you'll find they're not very practical.  

concerned99
concerned99

"how practical it is to have a college football coach on the sideline or in a locker room, going down more than once a year, on average, with a seizurein full view of a television audience and a stadium full of fans"

You really missed the boat on this issue. While someone who suffers from seizures is not a good candidate to be a pilot or operate heavy machinery, being a college football coach is a very good option. If he has a seizure at a game, there are first-class trainers and medical staff feet away to take care of him, and a plethora of assistant coaches who can take over. Plus he would set the example for his team on the importance of fighting through tough issues. And subjecting television or stadium audiences to someone having a seizure isn't a bad thing either - when I was a child they didn't have other children with disabilities in the classroom to "protect" us from having to witness these horrible conditions - all that did was increase the shame and isolation on the children and families suffering from disabilities. Now in most areas, able-bodies and disabled children attend school together. There is no need to isolate those suffering from epilepsy any more than is absolutely required.

CoreyLivermore
CoreyLivermore

"Each week I judge teams based on where I think they would rank if they were playing each other at a neutral field."

So you're saying, essentially, that if the Packers played the Bengals, Dolphins, or Chargers on a neutral field, the Packers would lose all 3 of those games?  Really?

Peter, your bias against the Packers continues to shine in all of its infamous non-glory.  At some point even you have to recognize that the Packers are at the very least a decent team who has the capacity to go the distance.  Unlike the 3 teams I mentioned above, by the way.  None of those teams has any real chance of going deep into the playoffs, no matter what you think.

jomolungma
jomolungma

"So, I doubt you’re going to get a watchdog group to be very worried about fans being exposed to a loud stadium." 


Probably not, but you can sure as heck bet that there is a watchdog group looking out for the WORKERS at these stadiums.  I'm sure there are vendors roaming the stands, security positioned throughout the stadium, etc.  Subjecting those individuals to prolonged noise - the equivalent of a jet engine - would seem to be a pretty big problem and I'm sure OSHA would agree.  There's a reason that, when you look out the window of your plane, all the folks on the tarmac are wearing ear protection.  It may only be 8 days a year, but it's still a problem and one that can't be flippantly disregarded.

leroyquimby
leroyquimby

I'm just glad you didn't say I hope Chip Kelly realizes he isn't in college.  I just think everyone keeps touting how smart Chip Kelly is but how smart can you be if you accept a job on higher level thinking its the level you just left.  I'm pretty sure Chip Kelly has a plan knowing that you only get 53 players in a longer season who are older than college kids.  I think a 4 year can figure that out.  I also think he isn't going to tell you that plan.  

Also Vick gets hurt every year, have a plan for when it happens.

macbaldy
macbaldy

@Ciscos Meh.  Fantasy football fans over-think themselves all the time, rather like chasing their tails.

OK
OK

@dunkmycat7  

King got the disease as a butt boy for NFL Czar Roger Good For Nothing.

OK
OK

@AndyM  

Here's hoping one of King's brat daughters acquires epilepsy and suffers repeated general tonic clonic (grand mal) seizures in the workplace and other public settings.

Then King can take the same hardline stance and tell his punk daughter's employer to can her backside in the name of ... being a good father.

beekay31
beekay31

@Dana2 Don't forget the implementation of the now-outlawed crackback block.  Shanahan could barely make the playoffs after it became illegal.  And GB won the SB after the '96 season.  Denver didn't make the AFCC game.

OK
OK

@StevenMartino  

Stevie,

The Gophers have played three games this season.

The Gophers' record is 3-0.

Three games. Three wins.

And better is?

mnico213
mnico213

@cottsb1 Or last week, he thought there were five better teams and now he thinks there are eleven.  I'd much prefer to see analysts moving teams around a lot in the beginning of the year when we don't know much about teams from week to week.  It shows that they are thinking about it rather than just taking last week's ranking and moving teams that won up and teams that lost down.

eddie767
eddie767

@Wombat You read for his opinion,but then complain. He needs you as much as you need him. But,if you suffer seizures,your MD has told you all minor ones lead to one major one. I just hope,if it happens,it's not on TV.

decredico
decredico

@Wombat king has always been an ignoramus   ... he is just not a very bright guy to begin with

ProfessorGriff
ProfessorGriff

@VIPOD4ever I wouldn't hire Gruden to oversee my fantasy football team.  The guy is an idiot and a hick.  Can't stand him as a broadcaster, either.

decredico
decredico

@Rickapolis some of us only come back to take a crap on king   ... reading his slurry of for the feeble minded

gnosisNU
gnosisNU

@CoreyLivermore Even as a Miami fan, I was quite surprised to see the Fins ranked so high. But then you have to keep in mind, who really cares? One man's opinion carries zero weight to the reality of a team's ability or season. The Packers will either prove themselves or disappoint, regardless of where Peter King ranks them.

himay333
himay333

@jomolungma and just like those workers on the tarmac, I'm betting most of the workers have ear protection as well (most likely provided by the stadium).  I typically had ear plugs when i worked security for concerts.

AndyM
AndyM

@OK @AndyM Well, you know, i don't hope that. Don't really understand why he took the stance he did, tho.

cottsb1
cottsb1

@mnico213 @cottsb1 true enough, I just think the justification offered is petulant and doesn't acknowledge the inconsistency in logic of moving a team down 6 slots after a win. Or at least doesn't acknowledge that the rankings in the first week were completely off.

Wombat
Wombat

@eddie767 That's just the point... it IS opinion, not fact, and can thus be argued. The fact that I think Peter is a better person than his seizure comment made him was the confusing point I queried not his football expertise. Also, since I have a seizure disorder myself I know that  petit mal seizures do not always lead to grand mal,... having one does not mean you will ever have another, but if you do medical science is getting better and better at controlling them now. A few decades ago epileptics were committed to institutions, now its a controllable condition in most cases. I'm sure Coach Kill's doctors and employers are on top of this much more so than, say, a drive by comment from a reporter... I wouldn't have commented at all except that the drive by reporter alters public opinion with his ignorant opinions and that is not fair. PK should know better... 

LeeMichael1
LeeMichael1

@ProfessorGriff @VIPOD4ever You sir are...................100% correct . I have music on or the mute on stand by when the luckiest Super Bowl coach in history yaps . He's right up there with Tim McCarver and Rick Sutcliff for baseball equals .

AndyM
AndyM

@OK @AndyM  OK, cool. Glad to see we are both on the side of compassion.

OK
OK

@AndyM

I do hope that. Only way to get through to a Professional Butt Kisser like King is to kick him or a member of his family in the head several times. You cannot expect compassion or intelligence from a PBK like King; only being on the end of a severe beating conveys the message to him.

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