The Redemption of Rivers

Left for dead, the career of Philip Rivers has new life, as the Chargers' quarterback is on pace for a career-best year. So what's changed? Plus, more of what I'll be watching in Week 5

Philip Rivers is on pace for the best season of his career. (Wesley Hitt/Getty Images)
Philip Rivers is on pace for the best season of his career. (Wesley Hitt/Getty Images)

Everyone wondered how Philip Rivers would respond to a new coach, Mike McCoy, coordinator and quarterback coach (Ken Whisenhunt and Frank Reich) this year, after spending his recent football life with a coach, Norv Turner, who basically served as all three at times for six of Rivers’ nine NFL seasons.

But there’s been quick bonding with the coaches, some underrated help from GM Tom Telesco, and smart play from a quarterback who knows he’s thrown too many interceptions over the years. Rivers is on his way to one of the best years of his NFL life—the best, if he keeps playing like he did in September. Through four weeks, Rivers is by far the most accurate he’s been in his career (his 73.9 completion rate is 8 percent better than his previous career best), and though he’s concentrating on making the safer throws this year, he’s also on pace for the most prolific passing season of his life: 4,796 yards, 44 touchdowns.

He’s done it while losing his No. 1 wideout, Malcom Floyd, for the season, and with his second-best wideout target, Eddie Royal, playing with less impact after a Week 2 battering at Philadelphia. There are three reasons why Rivers has found new life post-Norv:

1. The best low-cost free-agency signing of the NFL offseason: jack-of-all-trades offensive weapon Danny Woodhead. In the last three weeks, Rivers targeted his all-world tight end, Antonio Gates, 27 times, and Woodhead 24. Woodhead has basically replaced Darren Sproles, who former GM A.J. Smith decided not to pay and who has been missed terribly by Rivers. Woodhead in the backfield in the regular offense. Woodhead as third-down back. Woodhead in the slot. Woodhead in motion. Woodhead split wide. Sound familiar? Woodhead has 19 carries, 22 catches and two touchdowns, and an average touch of 6.1 yards. And Telesco stole him from New England for $1.75 million a year.

“I don’t want to hurt the feelings of any of the other guys we got in free agency,’’ Rivers told me this week. “But Danny was the guy I was most excited about. You remember that guy we used to have here, the guy who left and still is doing great things in New Orleans? Well, Danny’s just like [Sproles]. He does a lot of everything. He’s not just a third-down back. You can split him out, and we do. Plus, he just loves to play.’’

Pass at Your Own Peril

Taking to the air has become the way of the NFL, but when do we reach the point where teams are passing too much, for the worse? We may already be there, Greg A. Bedard writes.

2. Rivers is getting rid of the ball faster. Last year, according to Pro Football Focus, Rivers got rid of the ball in 3.5 seconds or less just 45 percent of the time. Now he’s deciding faster and throwing quicker; 66 percent of his throws come out within 2.5 seconds of the snap. He’s the third-fastest in the league at getting rid of the football this year, and that’s never been his strong suit. “There’s no way to deny we’re throwing more high-percentage passes,’’ Rivers said. “Ten, 12, 15 yards … We still want the chunk plays, but we’re happy taking what we can get. Sometimes I have to make myself not be bored with the three-yard completion, but it’s good for us.’’

3. The number of open targets he’s seeing. There’s no way to quantify this, because stats aren’t kept for “open receivers.” But this goes hand in hand with 1 and 2. Watch the San Diego games, and you see Woodhead (“It’s just amazing how easy he gets open,’’ Rivers said) slithering away from coverage the way Wes Welker does. Rivers doesn’t feel the pressure to force the ball downfield now because he knows he’ll have either Woodhead or the hot receiver (sometimes the same) or maybe Gates open not far beyond the line of scrimmage. McCoy takes pride in his offense giving his quarterback more than one option on many throws, and Rivers has seized the openings and not been greedy. Sometimes, it’s best to hit the first open guy and just move the chains.

“You’re right,’’ he said, when I asked about missing Turner. “I love Norv. He was great for me.’’

But—and this is a big “but’’—it’s so obvious now Rivers needed a change to jump-start a flagging career. He’s gotten it. One of the underrated parts is how quickly he’s bonded with his new coaches. Can it last? If Woodhead and Gates stay upright, it surely can. If you can stay up Sunday night, you’ll see the new and improved Rivers in the nightcap (seriously) of the first-ever night-night Bay Area NFL doubleheader. Houston is at San Francisco at 5:30 p.m. Pacific Time on NBC, and San Diego at Oakland is set for 8:40 p.m. PT on NFL Network. Strange timing, considering West Coast night games always start 5:30 or 6 to optimize the prime-time East Coast crowd. “It’s going to be pretty weird starting a game that late out here, because we never do it,’’ said Rivers. “But [McCoy] said to us, and he’s right, ‘I don’t want to hear a word about starting this game so late.’ Really, it’s no big deal.”

Well, not unless you’re a Charger fan in Harrisburg handed a bonus chance to see the new and improved Rivers.

About Last Night …

Cleveland 37, Buffalo 24. I am now convinced more than ever after the events of Thursday night that every quarterback coach in the NFL needs to make sliding a part of the offseason training regimen. I am not kidding. It’s trite and funny to make fun of awkward sliders like Michael Vick, and most analyses of Vick sliding end up in a raucous laugh or a funny highlight. It’s not funny. Brian Hoyer is lost—maybe for the year—because he slid incorrectly and then got pile-driven into the turf by Buffalo linebacker Kiko Alonso. (Not a dirty play, by the way; Alonso dived to stop Hoyer after the quarterback began his awkward landing.) And what is E.J. Manuel doing barreling into tacklers trying to make one extra yard on the sideline? A quarterback’s job is not to slam into bodies trying to make an extra yard or two near the sideline. His job is to get out of bounds and get back to run the next play. Two lessons, painfully learned. But if I’m a smart head coach, I’m putting “sliding practice’’ on my quarterback to-do list at minicamp next spring … and sooner, if my quarterback is awful at it right now.

(Continue to Page 2 to find out more of what I’ll be watching this weekend)

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35 comments
jj55
jj55

Last night, Philip Rivers looked like Philip Rivers again. 3 picks, bad decisions, delay of game penalty coming out a replay challenge.  Oh well.

AnthonyKlefas
AnthonyKlefas

I guess Rivers turned into a "Interception-Machine" when the clock struck midnight at the O.com???  

Yes King, the Raiders are the worst team in the league. If you so called experts write it down it must be true.  LOL

FaatherCzasu
FaatherCzasu

And Telesco stole him from New England for $1.75 million a year."

One point seven five million dollars. That's the yearly household [household!!!] income for 39 American families. And this bozo thinks it's a price off the discount shelf. Time for an income revolution!!!

JohnDooms
JohnDooms

A few things King is overlooking (sort of). While he says that Rivers is getting the ball out quicker, he doesn't talk about one of the reasons why: Rivers is being allowed to use his brain, one of his greatest assets. The no-huddle offense is run a lot more than Norval allowed and it lets Rivers get to the line and have the time to get solid reads on defenses. More than a few opposing teams have commented that he's been able to decipher their calls, make changes at the line, and make them pay for blitzes or man coverage. Rivers has one of the highest completion percentages this year for plays where he's blitzed. Whisenhunt has developed a number of quick, short pass plays which Norval stubbornly limited - that's why Rivers was the second most sacked QB in the league last season (although, turtles are faster). Another thing King forgets is Antonio Gates resurgence. He's healthy again and shares the record for most TD's with a QB with Rivers. Connections like that don't grow on trees.

TheHypnotoad44
TheHypnotoad44

That first sentence is impossible to parse. Who writes like that?

Mike26
Mike26

I am a bit apprehensive about posting anything without knowing what JoeCabot thinks first - his overall intelligence and originality on ALL sports topics is as impressive as it is intimidating.

Sdwalt
Sdwalt

Rivers as been transformed this year, I hope it continues.

JoeSwimmer
JoeSwimmer

Re Sliding: Maybe a rule change is in order when quarterbacks get hurt while doing that which was intended to spare them from getting hurt.I suggest the qb shriek – a simple high-pitched scream from the quarterback under duress would signal the end of the play.The quarterback would wear a microphone, of course, and be connected to the p.a. system.

RayIsBipolar
RayIsBipolar

I picture Peter King sleeping like Kathy Bates in The Waterboy with him mumbling mmmPeyton,Peyton, Peyton in betwenn snores instead of devil. I bet King retires a week after Peyton so he can write one more glorious story on his mancrush and not have to actually try and find stories any longer since his go-to will be done.

Anyone ever notice how King doesn't have a neck? His fat head with his Albert Brooks jew fro  sits on sad droopy shoulders and that's it, no neck . He has to be the least athletic person alive and he tries to tell the world about football. Hilarious

Tommy K
Tommy K

incorrect .. Rivers actually lost his #1 and #2 top targets this year - people already forget Danario X because he was hurt early in preseason ... but he was emerging as the clear #1 threat

Phroggo
Phroggo

Still don't understand why they couldn't switch the home and home dates with Oakland playing in San Diego Sunday and hosting San Diego in December.  By December 16 the dirt infield will be covered with sod and they could play at a decent time.

Burp
Burp

@FaatherCzasu That's the dumbest comment I've seen in a long time. You sound like my grandmother who doesn't have a clue about professional sports. 1.8 mil is a steal by NFL standards for that kind of player.

patsfan94
patsfan94

@FaatherCzasu What do you suppose we do exactly.  Funnel more NFL revenue to the owners?  Artificially lower NFL revenue by artificially capping prices on tickets or TV contracts? 

Skins'Fan
Skins'Fan

@JohnDooms I would have to agree with you but some of that may be borne out of necessity due to their porous offensive line - thanks injuries! His release stats still did impress considering Rivers has a little "sitting-duck" in him. He just has that awkward 3/4, shotput style throw that is a slow delivery. I wouldn't say Gates is 'resurgent' either but at least he's been on the field and that alone is enough to open their offense up. Rivers seems to fit this offense well but last nights game got ugly for him... No point in releasing it quickly if it's going to the opposing team!

FaatherCzasu
FaatherCzasu

@TheHypnotoad44  The first sentence is also a paragraph. And a one sentence paragraph is Rule 1 of no-no's of Writing 101. King gets a F.

JohnDooms
JohnDooms

@RayIsBipolar You're an ugly person with only ugly things to say. Sorry life isn't working out for you - I'd recommend an attitude adjustment.

Dana2
Dana2

@RayIsBipolar  Don't forget king's LONG-time crush on Favre, along with scott pioli & all things Boston.  

Gee - I wonder what beer and coffee he's going to drink and tell us all about *this* week? - 

(I can hardly wait till Monday to find out)


ps - you're right about the no-neck but you left out the skunk-stripe in the fro


Skins'Fan
Skins'Fan

@RayIsBipolar It's fine to not enjoy a writers style or the fact he enjoys writing about some players but, c'mon. Don't attack him on a personal level unless you're in grade school. If you don't like his "mancrush" then don't read his articles, that simple. Also, two other things:

Peyton is arguably the greatest QB ever so he deserves every character written about him.

Peyton is in the midst of a stretch of football NEVER SEEN, EVER before.

And one final thing: your ridiculous hatred for such a trivial thing is downright sad. Get a hobby.

rhynohead
rhynohead

@Tommy K Correct.  Curious why Peter King left out Danario. Rivers is basically doing this with undersized "slot" type receivers. Of course it doesn't hurt that Gates is back to form and the addition of Woodhead can't be understated. Kudos to the coaching staff. Norv's issue wasn't his offensive genius (schemes), but his lack of utilizing the strengths and skill sets of his players. I think we found a gem in McCoy, but I'll reserve my judgements till the end of the year. 

JohnDooms
JohnDooms

@Phroggo Exactly. I'm east coast so would have to stay up to 3AM on Monday morning to watch - can't do that.

FaatherCzasu
FaatherCzasu

@SdwaltWho made you the decider of who gets to write comments here? I suggest you go away instead.

RayIsBipolar
RayIsBipolar

@Skins'Fan @RayIsBipolar This coming from a fan of the most openly racist team in sports history. Worry about your team nickname before you get after me.

RooneyRuleBlues
RooneyRuleBlues

@JohnDooms @Phroggo Pretty easy to understand.  If your the Chargers why would you give up a HOME game in DECEMBER?  This is not the Chargers fault.  All games in December can be very important. So when you have the chance to play them at home you do so.

Skins'Fan
Skins'Fan

@RayIsBipolar @Skins'Fan I'm fine with the name. No worse than "Indians" or "Blackhawks" as far as I'm concerned. Worry about those team nicknames and 'troll' against them before you get after me.

Mike26
Mike26

@RayIsBipolar @Mark20 Ray, you really should try to stay away from real people.  Best you stick to internet message boards - THAT is clearly your calling!

evileyefleagle
evileyefleagle

@RooneyRuleBlues  

I assume you meant to say "If you are the Chargers".  And IF you're the Chargers and you're afraid of the Raiders, you've got a bigger problem than where the game's played.

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