Matthew Stafford Comes of Age

Now it’s your time to speak on the issue of head trauma and football.

In the past week, we at The MMQB have tried to take the head-trauma debate deeper, with 19 stories exploring ideas about a safer game, the realities of playing a violent game, and the complicated issues facing youth and high-school football today.

Read the series, or any one of the stories in it.

My takeaways from the series: It surprises me that parents—and we interviewed 23 of them who spoke this way—cede the decision to play or not play high-school football to their sons. That has changed in the time since I was a (quite marginal) high-school athlete in Enfield, Conn. If my father and mother thought the sport I was playing was excessively dangerous, they’d have interceded and recommended and/or demanded I not play. But many of the parents we interviewed in 49 states said it was up to their son where he would play. I understand wanting to empower your children, but I’m not sure empowering 15- and 16-year-olds who make decisions based very often on emotion is a smart call … Also: If I were the NFL, and I read this series, I would think seriously about investing some money in trainers and equipment at some of the hotbed high schools such as those in Kansas that are too small to afford a trainer at every school … And this: I don’t think football will die. I think it needs some care; and it needs to be certain that correct form tackling be taught at the grassroots level across the country, and that there be a uniform way to deal with head-to-head hits and aftermath care of concussions.

Now for some reactions to the writing we did.

From the editor in charge of the series, Matt Gagne


Can football change? Will the sport become safer? How are concussions impacting the game‘s future?

Introducing an in-depth series where we tackle those questions, starting at high schools and continuing into college and the NFL. Read the entire series.

When I sat down to write my final thoughts on concussions, I became engrossed in reading all of the feedback we received. There is nothing I can add in the way of opinion, and it would be disingenuous to try and steer the conversation in a particular direction. Our readers covered the entire spectrum. Some I agree with, others I can see their point, and a few seem to be pretending there isn’t a problem. But it’s all worth reading.

We didn’t set out to do a series attacking football or telling people they shouldn’t play football; the science hasn’t yet evolved to say once you cross a certain threshold of brain trauma you’ve done irreparable harm. At the same time, the known science should have everyone asking, What’s going on exactly? (The PBS documentary League of Denial should be required viewing for NFL fans.)

Playing football or even watching football is very much a personal decision, and, as we saw in our coverage last week, the issue is only getting more complex. Concussions have always been a part of the game, but as our understanding of the injury progresses, so should the conversation about head trauma in football. Of all the stories we ran last week, one line in Jenny Vrentas’s piece about how football might be played in the future resonated the most. “By 2025,” she wrote, “we might see the accepted timeframe to return from a concussion increasing from a seven- to 10-day window to a few weeks, on par with a high ankle sprain.” In that context, how can you not wonder what’s going on exactly?

From the comments sections

Diffusion tensor imaging could reveal in real time what is happening inside the brain—much more effectively than MRIs and CT scans do now. (Getty Images/Science Photo Library RM)
Diffusion tensor imaging could reveal in real time what is happening inside the brain—much more effectively than MRIs and CT scans do now. (Getty Images/Science Photo Library RM)

From “branlishan:” “There is a non-stop assault on football by SI and its writers. We get it now. Football is dangerous. If football is such a barbaric sport then why do you cover the games and bring attention to the glory of it all? SI should stop with the hypocritical garbage. Either line up behind the ‘ban football’ crowd and stop covering a sport that is so dangerous, or shut up. Because this non-stop assault never ends.’’

From “decredico,” to me: “You sat on this story for years and under reported it and you are part of the package that kept this off the radar for many years. You are a disingenuous hypocrite that should be excoriated and excommunicated and banished to writing for the local garden section of a small town newspaper.’’

From “BillRobinson:” “Incremental change has always been a part of football and any successful enterprise. The changes I’ve seen so far seem reasonable to me and don’t in any way limit my enjoyment of the game. If we can limit the frequency and severity of injuries and maintain the elements of the game we enjoy, why not?’’

From “solidbrass79:” “Football has changed before, it will change again, and if the reason is for player safety, all to the good. Every knucklehead defending ‘football as we know it’ ignores the facts. There once was a flying wedge, but the so-called nanny state—in the form of a Republican President still invoked in convention speeches, Teddy Roosevelt—intervened. Once there were no helmets, then leather helmets, then hard hats with no face guard. The sport survived.”

From “hlmencken56:” “We’re just a country full of cowards now. Everyone is a victim, and nobody should ever get hurt, or the risks always must be lowered.”

From Twitter

From former college and NFL quarterback Danny Kanell, now an ESPN analyst, on the Richard Sherman we-know-and-accept-the-risks-we-take column: “This is the most honest, revealing look at concussions from a current NFL player’s perspective.”

From talkback@themmqb.com

“As a young reporter in high school, one of my teachers who played football through college (Division III) and was only in his early 30s let me do a story on how concussions were already affecting him. The memory loss was already bad enough that he had forgotten to pick his kids up from school several times and told me depressing thoughts came often. It’s important for people to know concussions in football affect not only famous NFL players but every citizen who steps on a field.”

—Ryan, Syracuse University Class of 2016

“I’ve been a high school football ref in central Pennsylvania for 13 years. I’ve been extremely concerned about concussions for about eight or nine years. Some things have changed. Most coaches are much more sensitive to head injuries now, and I think the ‘macho tough guy’ element of this debate is starting to wane. However, there are still a few bad apples making it hard for the rest of the sport. Two weeks ago I watched a visiting-team player go down with an apparent foot injury. He was literally screaming in pain. The home team trainer suspected a broken foot, but the boy’s coach was exhorting him to ‘shake it off, we’ll tape it up, you’re going back in.’ The trainer stood his ground and demanded he be taken for an x-ray. I heard later that the broken foot was confirmed. I sometimes wonder why I’m still a ref. I have discouraged my boys from playing. My hometown high school coach demands year-round participation. I’ve seen so many injuries. They start tackling in pads at age 8 here now. It’s really become too much. On the other hand, I feel that by staying in as an official and doing my part to call the illegal hits and enforce good sportsmanship and fair play, just maybe I’m doing a tiny bit to make the game better.’’

—Dave

.

“I have been a fan of you and your MMQB column for seven or eight years now and never miss one. I was really looking forward to your new MMQB page and for the most part I have really enjoyed it. However lately I have not nearly enjoyed MMQB as much. I feel like I have been given a concussion by being beaten over the head with your concussion reports. Please go back to the reporting of fun football. You don’t have to ignore concussions completely, but man I feel like you guys are trying to ruin something that I enjoy so very much. It’s like if every time I eat something bad for me, my wife is standing behind me telling me that it’s going to kill me.”

—Brock

“As a parent with a 9-year old and 14-year old playing football, and as a coach and huge football fan, I think the real problem here is all the negative publicity that is causing unnecessary concern and alarm. I do believe that efforts must continue to be made through better equipment, medical supervision and education. However the media needs to stop talking about it. Parents should be talking about it, players should be talking about it, coaches should be talking about it, medical professionals need to be talking about it but the media needs to leave it alone!! If that happens, both the safety and future of the game will be protected!’’

—Kris, Abbotsford, British Columbia

Teaching young players the proper tackling techniques is one way to help limit the types of hits that can cause head injuries. (Pouya Dianat/Special to Sports Illustrated)
Teaching young players the proper tackling techniques is one way to help limit the types of hits that can cause head injuries. (Pouya Dianat/Special to Sports Illustrated)

“This issue hits very close to home for me. When my son was a sophomore in high school, I was forced to re-examine it and its importance in our lives. Until August 2011, our family’s life revolved around football.  Then, in a junior varsity game, it all changed. My son Drew, a linebacker/receiver for Midway High School in Waco, Texas, filled a hole at the goal line. He was hit on the side of the head by the lead fullback. He didn’t lose consciousness, but ran off the field holding his head. After the game the trainer told me he needed to go to the ER to be checked out. Drew’s eyes were dilated and he had no idea where he was, what had happened, or even his own sister’s name.  Drew was out 6 weeks with residual symptoms. When he returned to practice for the playoffs, he took another shot and immediately the symptoms returned. He told Drew he may be predisposed to concussions, and it might be over for him. Standing at the elevator in the doctor office, Drew made a ‘grown man’ decision to leave the game he loved with every fiber of his being. We both cried all the way home. He’s never played again and two years later still misses the game terribly. My biggest regret as a Dad is making the game, something that can be taken away in an instant, such a big part of our lives and his identity. Two years later he’s adjusted well, but he will tell you, he still wishes he could play every Friday night. Thank you for taking a deeper look at the issue at every level.  Hopefully parents will realize it’s just a game, and not allow it to fill such a large part of their lives like I did.’’

—Mark, Waco, Texas

“Thank you for the article about athletic trainers in Kansas. This is a big issue for the profession.”

—Greg McMillen, athletic trainer, Buffalo Bills. Robert Klemko’s story about a high school in Smith Center, Kans., reported the school shares an athletic trainer with 11 other high schools in Kansas and Nebraska, meaning many high-school games are played without any medical personnel present.

“The telling stats in your survey were that eight of 49 coaches have not modified training techniques and a whopping 34 out of 96 parents are not worried about football’s future health effects on their kids. This is not controversial science anymore and in fact, it probably never should have been considering that you only have to have had your bell rung once to know that it’s not healthy.  Those eight coaches who have not modified training techniques seem akin to eight out of 49 nutritionists who wouldn’t advocate removing soda machines from school cafeterias.’’

—Ron, Towson, Md.

“As a high school football coach for the last seventeen years, I have had the recurring three thoughts concerning concussions:

1. If the NFL is so serious about reducing concussions, why is there such a large percentage of players in the NFL that don’t even utilize mouth pieces. They are mandatory from high school down to youth leagues, but then there is no mandatory requirement beginning in college. Why?

2. With all of the testing and studying of helmets, why are so many players (any, really) in the NFL still permitted to wear the Riddell VSR4 model? Even Riddell has cautioned players against wearing the helmet.

3. When is the last time the field changed size or shape? No one would argue that players have continually grown bigger, faster, and stronger. However, the field has stayed the same size. More space would likely lead to at least fewer collisions.’’

—Damon

“I was once one of the tough guys. Although I didn’t have anything close to a prolific ‘career,’ I’ve played in my fair share of football games, from Pop Warner to D3 college. This was the game that we chose. One of my favorite coaches used to say, ‘In order to play this game—and play it well—you need to have at least a few screws loose.’ I would absolutely agree. But then I recently watched League of Denial and read the MMQB stories on head trauma in the game. I’m terrified for a different reason now. Seeing the stories of what has become of greats like Iron Mike Webster, and the pain of Lisa McHale was eye opening to me. I, myself, have exhibited symptoms that I fear could be CTE-related. It’s a scary prospect, and one that I wish I had both expected and been prepared for earlier.’’

—Dale

.

“My name is Shawn Boyle and I’m the president of the Black Hills Youth Football League in Rapid City, S.D. I keep hearing about leagues around the country losing players each season. We see the opposite. Our league began in 2009 with 250 participants. This season, we’re just shy of 1,000 players. We are South Dakota’s fastest growing youth sports program, and I firmly believe it’s because last year, our board voted unanimously to adopt the “Heads Up” program, brought to us by USA Football with help from the NFL. Our transformation began over the summer, when we appointed a newly designated “Player Safety Coach” from each association, packed them all up and made the seven-hour drive to Denver to participate in a weekend of training. We spent hours in groups on the field using pads and dummies, learning to teach our youth the great sport of football. “Great hit” is out. “Great tackle’’ is in. We returned to South Dakota and set up mandatory training classes for our over 200 coaches. I already see results. Last season, we had over 20 diagnosed concussions, (mostly mild as is always the case—we err on the side of caution and safety). As we enter the playoffs for this season, we’ve had fewer than 10. If you attend a game, and if you know what you are looking for, you can see a difference between the play of those young athletes implementing what they have learned through Heads Up coaching and those who haven’t been trained that way. The parents have been 100 percent on board. As their little guys mature and grow, tackling and hitting the proper way is all they’ll know.’’

—A youth league president in South Dakota. USA Football figures show that about 3 million children, ages six through 14, played organized tackle football in 2011, and that number dipped six percent to 2.8 million in 2012.

“I am not a believer in one-liners or pithy statements, but in this case it really is this simple: The [Richard Sherman] column is an elegant illustration of the need to protect some people from themselves.’’

—David

“I love the new MMQB web site. I love the work you folks are putting into it. It’s been a great new resource for us football fans who can’t get enough of our favorite sport. But I have concussion-story fatigue. I understand the concussion issue is a big issue. I understand that it’s big news. I understand you feel compelled to cover it. I understand that this issue will inevitably change the game I love and that someday down the road this sport will not look the same, if it even exists at all. So I understand the desire to cover this news in its nascent state. But I just can’t take any more of the coverage. It’s too depressing.’’

—Christopher

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365 comments
samantha.reinsel35
samantha.reinsel35

Hey Queenie,

Eagles the biggest disappointment....in your face, you're missing too many of your so-called expert opinionated statements.

Maybe it's time to hang up your pen and paper!!!!

BronzeBomber
BronzeBomber

Offenses are pretty efficient nowadays Peter.  Shouldn't we nerf them as well?

AlDavis
AlDavis

Way off on the field goal and extra point take. Absolutely no reason to make it harder. The Rams miss from 50 last Monday night is a perfect example of a missed field goal costing a team a game. It still happens and even though an extra point is a gimme I still want to see them make it. Gives the team on the short end of the score a chance sometimes, slim, but a chance. Nothing needs to be done. The NFL has already made too many rule changes. Enough is enough.

sterculius65
sterculius65

Dear Peter,

Sorry to rain on your orgy of piling on the Eagles

in MMQB but so many of your claims are not backed

up by the facts (to put it nicely).

For instance...

"I think the Eagles have to be the disappointment

of the season."

Really? Really? Bigger dissapointment than the the

2-5 Falcons coming off a 13-3 season and a Super

Bowl pick by many? Bigger disapointment than the

Steelers? Bigger disapoinment than the

Redskins...?

Fact is most people had the Eagles at best going

8-8 and most not even that. To say they are the

biggest dissapointment is pure drivel. They are

record wise right where most people thought they

would be.

" A Chip Kelly team first and foremost has to have

consistency and efficiency at quarterback, and

Philadelphia hasn’t had that all season"

Again really? Look at the QB ratings by game....

1. Vick 112.6
2. Vick 123.4
3. Vick 49.4
4. vick 83.6
4. Foles 155.2 (garbage time)
5. Foles 114.9, vick 69
6. foles 133.3

Weeks 7 and 8 are disasters of course but weeks

1,2,4,5 and 6 all make your cliam the Eagles

haven't had consistency and efficiency at

quarterback all season clearly absurd.

"Why, oh why, Chip Kelly, when you’re one score

behind with four minutes to go, your defense

playing well and three timeouts left do you onside

kick?"

Agreed but thay had one timeout left, not three.

Again if you are going to criticize at least have

your facts straight.

"The problem in Philadelphia, which is lucky to be

3-5, is Kelly can’t hang his hat on anything in

his offense."

Lucky to be 3-5?

Lets see they have won by margins of 6,15 and 9

points. They have lost by margins of 3,10,32 and

8. I'd say they are pretty much where they should

be but if you want to bring luck in to it then if

they had any they would be closer to 4-4 than 2-6.

It makes me wonder just how much of the Eagles you

have watched this year...

HonoluluBlue
HonoluluBlue

Greatly overlooked stat from the Lions-Cowboys game.   Stafford set the NFL record for fewest games to reach 15,000 yards passing.  Better than.....everybody.  Name your QB.

Stafford haters repeat after me....Joe Montana would have been nothing without Jerry Rice....not tell me how silly you feel.


BeholdTheWolverine
BeholdTheWolverine

I see I'm not the only one getting annoyed at the petulance this column (sorry...business site) is showing.  Just this week alone the Diva-nature about this NOT being SI.com.  Well, that may be true, but I'm pretty sure that's where 99% of your readers read it, and how they associate it, and that they/we/I don't care about any legal distinction between the two.  If you want to be your own, then don't run it on SI.com and start spending the marketing dollars so people know (or care about) the difference.

Second, the Patriots didn't ignore Troy Brown's advice either.  Since the Patriots were never down 24-7 his advice was moot.

Seriously, don't you think the internet is snarky enough as it is without adding to it?  This column (or whatever) is not as enjoyable as it was before this reincarnation.  Harder to follow, harder to read, and all in all less fun and enjoyable.  I may be in the minority, but I don't view this as an improvement.

RayHuggyBearYoung
RayHuggyBearYoung

Thats MMQB.Si.com  Peter.  If you really want your site to be all MMQB  cut away from Si.com.  Its part of your web address and writers can give credit to Si.com on it.

cdawg
cdawg

I am a 9er fan and still think you ranked them too high. I think they should be 5th behind Denver and Seattle along with Indy and KC

2229JEFF
2229JEFF

I have been following your concussion stories with some interest.Not sure but it seems you are missing the obvious problem. Playing a contact sport with a fibreglass helmet and padding must be a factor when combined with such large, powerful athletes.We play a variety of contact sports here in Australia and no rigid padding or helmets are permitted in either of the Rugby codes or Australian Rules football at a professional or amateur level. While we have incidence of concussions they seem to be dealt with in the main well and we do not appear to be suffering the same issues as you are in American Football with respect to retired players.Would there be more or less concussions if the pads and helmets came off ?

Dustin3
Dustin3

meh.... a lot of QB's will have a "coming of age moment" when they play Dallas' defense. Dallas is the only NFL team to allow more than one 400 yard passer so far this season......and they've done it 4 TIMES.

jj55
jj55

Memo to Peter King (said with slight annoyance). The MMQB is a blatant to attempt to "brand" you as SI's answer to Bill Simmons and Grantland. Stop whining, keep writing, and let SI's publicity team position your website as America's gift to football. We readers will ultimately make that call, not you.

BobLang
BobLang

Kickers are making a lot more kicks… more domed stadiums have anything to do with that? Probably can blame it on global warming. 

Also, I don't think you meant to write from the 40-49 yard line. I think you just meant 40-49 yard field goals. From the 40-49 yard line would be 57-66 yard field goals. I have a hard time believing that kickers are making 80 percent of those. 

humdrumdrumhumming
humdrumdrumhumming

3. San Francisco (6-2). Five straight wins by an average of 22.6 points. This team’s getting scary. Think of the room to grow for this offense entering the bye: In the last two weeks, the Niners have scored 73 points in two road wins a total of 10 time zones from home … and gotten only 363 yards and one passing touchdown in the process.


the 49ers, third, really?????

how about some context...  since the Niners barely beat the Packers on opening day they've played two winning teams --- they got crushed by both, losing 29-3 at Seattle and losing 27-7 to the Colts in SF..

the Niners five straight win came against St. Louis (3-5) Houston (2-5), Arizona (4-4), Tennesse (3-4), Jacksonville (0-8)... 

are we supposed to be impressed  because the 49ers are blowing out the worst teams in football?  

they haven't beat a team who's over .500 since opening day..

djp9192
djp9192

watching the weekend highlights i think i've never seen worse open field tackling ... arm tackles easily bumped off, or even air swings ... they really need to bring in some tackling coaches from rugby!

beekay31
beekay31

Stafford has come of age?  Is that why he needed 14 receptions and 329 yards from a single WR, one that just happens to be one of the best WRs to ever play the game, to eke out the win?  Look way, way back to 3 weeks ago against GB to see how well Stafford performs without Calvin Johnson.

gaucant
gaucant

How does Jason Garret not call a time out to set his defense. It's a huge play in the game and the defense is spent. Seems like the Cowboys always mismanage the clock and lose winnable games.

CoreyLivermore
CoreyLivermore

Tom Brady struggles with a bunch of no-name receivers and he gets headline after headline.  Aaron Rodgers does the same thing - and putting teams AWAY, no less - and he doesn't even get a mention this week.  Really?  44 points with Myles White and Jarrett Boykin and Andrew Quarless, and not a single mention?

I get that Peter is a Pats homer and all, but, in the immortal words of the guys on ESPN...

C'Mon, Man!

Mat X
Mat X

No style points in football?  C'mon Peter, you don't know how Division 1-A/F*BS* college football works, do you? :-D

Dale15
Dale15

I am amazed that you are giving so much credit to Stafford and less to the gross negligence of the officials.  On Dallas's last drive they call Tyron Smith (holding) which stopped the clock.  Good call, no problemw with that.  On Stafford's long completion to #18 the I saw stretch jersey HOLDING and.....................sigh, .no call.  Both were critical situations with differing standards of officiating.   Hmmmmm, if the same standard existed from play to play by the officials Stafford's play would be a mute point.  Why don't you point this out instead of glibly latching on to a headline story?!!!

decredico
decredico

pete king is the kid in high school that was always the last one choosen in pick up games ... hes a dolt .. he is nothing more than water carrier for the league spewing propaganda each week for middling minds to suck up ... anyone reading this and for real insight is just about as dumb as king

JPSmall
JPSmall

@sterculius65 I pretty much read this column because, despite all the bluster and unending support of certain players and teams, king gets almost unparalleled access to players and coaches. Add to that the new forum for players to actually write the article, and I'll stick around for a bit, but the new website (difficult to navigate) and pete's old tricks make it easier to miss every week. 

Why.
Why.

@BeholdTheWolverine IF you are in the minority than a lot of others here are too. I have posted this before about the article quality taking a nose dive. I think the mmqb (separate from si.com) has been a horrible idea. 

BrockDakiller
BrockDakiller

@2229JEFF I, as an American, like that idea. If yer nut is not in a shell, yer not as likely to try to crack it. Good thinking there, I think.

Nathan16
Nathan16

I was going to make that point too. Also, artificial turf is much better now than it was 15 years ago. How many kickers slipped on that crap in Texas Stadium when it was wet or cold?

Nathan16
Nathan16

Hush, Peter has a man crush on one-read Kapernick and doesn't want you pointing that out.

noly972
noly972

@djp9192 Or, the NFL could put the players through 'Heads-Up' Football training so that they could learn the proper tackling techniques they're supposedly teaching kids. But, I'm with you - the tackling is getting worse and worse. I blame the new contract with reduced practices overall and particularly practices with pads. 

 As far as your rugby coach idea, I believe that football could use some rugbyization. Aside from tackling coaches (a good idea), if we went back to leather helmets, head-first hits would become a thing of the past. In fact, concussions may become almost a non-issue since the players would be much more aware of protecting their heads. There's also the possibility that the concussions would be less severe. Violence in the game would be, by necessity, reduced. Instead of turning it into two-hand touch, rugbyize it a little.

CoreyLivermore
CoreyLivermore

@djp9192 The one thing that bothers me most in all of football - regardless of who is playing, regardless of which team they play for - is defenders not tackling properly.  It's the most basic thing that kids are taught how to do on defense, and yet it seems like nobody in the league can do it.

I think the media coverage and highlight reels spun by all the sports networks have given rise to players always wanting to be in those highlights instead of just doing their jobs.  And more often than not, arm tackles and the big hit lead to a missed tackle.

BobLang
BobLang

@beekay31 Guess you missed the pass on the last drive that set up the win. The one that maybe 5 or 6 QBs could make. Your boy Rodgers had a stinker against Cinci a few weeks ago and I bet you didn't berate him. Stafford is an elite QB. Deal with it. 

SpartanTarget
SpartanTarget

@CoreyLivermore All right, genius, where exactly is the Brady "headline" in this column? He made two appearances under things King didn't like, a section Rogers would be happy to stay out of, and a mention in the section about the batting play. Hilarious how King gets accused of being a "homer," even when he essentially just focuses on Brady for two sentences, and they're both about how bad he was. Sorry there wasn't another sentence saying "Aaron Rogers has perfectly routine win against the godawful Vikings" so you could go to bed without crying yourself to sleep.

BobLang
BobLang

@Dale15 Those were the only two holding calls made differently all game? You know the saying about holding, right? You could call it on every play. 

Shane Mac
Shane Mac

@decredico So, since you were reading the column, you are pointing out to everyone how dumb you are.  Makes me wonder where you were "choosen" in pick up games.

SpartanTarget
SpartanTarget

@decredico Why don't you just literally vomit on your keyboard next time? It'd be about as insightful.

BobLang
BobLang

Is Jordy Nelson a "no-name receiver"? I would argue that he is better than anything New England is running out there right now. Wait, I don't want to upset you. Rodgers is the best thing to happen to QBs since Montana retired. Shoot, he had Rice to throw to. Best thing since Bradshaw. No no, he won 4 Super Bowls, and had two hall of famers to throw to. I give up. Rodgers is the best. Ever.

CoreyLivermore
CoreyLivermore

@SpartanTarget @CoreyLivermore King has historically ignored everything the Packers do.  Last week, King sang nothing but praises for Brady and his win with no-names, even going so far as to turn a question in his mailbag last week about the Vikings into a diatribe about how great Brady is with a bunch of no-names.

So I'm just curious as to why Rodgers doesn't get the same treatment.  Hell, all he could say was that Rodgers won against a bad Vikings team, which diminishes that Rodgers led the Packers to 37 offensive points (7 came on the punt return) with no-name receivers, even though last week Brady barely won with no-names but got almost a full page.

And learn how to read, you moron.  I never stated the headline was in today's column, only that he continues to ignore what Rodgers does even though he does it with the same pieces Brady has, only doing it better.

SpartanTarget
SpartanTarget

@CoreyLivermore  I'd probably ask that you actually reply to the right thread. And ill-timed? Are you currently verbally abusing your sainted mater? Did I interrupt? Or have you apparently just never heard the very common phrase "You talk to your mother with that mouth?" and were unable to see that paraphrase? It's cool, though. I totally understand the urge to call someone a a moron and an ass-hat on the Internet, then feign being insulted. Have a graham cracker or something. It'll cool you down.

CoreyLivermore
CoreyLivermore

When the object of your ill-timed and accusatory violence (punch my mother?) is no longer around, I find the insult to be directed at her. And in very poor taste. I'll ask that you just go away now.

BobLang
BobLang

@SpartanTarget @CoreyLivermore @BobLang Finley's injury might be helping the Packers. He can't drop any balls from the sidelines. And I'm not a Pats homer. Can't stand them. 

Cobb is a no name? Jones is a no name? Nelson is a no name? Finley is a no name? He was throwing to all stars until 2 weeks ago. Great work against a horrible Vikings team. but hardly headline worthy. 

SpartanTarget
SpartanTarget

@CoreyLivermore @BobLang Jesus Christ, stop homering for the Patriots. Gronk's injury gets post after post, but not a word about how injured  Jermichael Finley is.

CoreyLivermore
CoreyLivermore

@BobLang And Gronk isn't a no-name either.  Granted, Gronk has been out since recently.  But still, Rodgers has been getting the job done with a bunch of no-names - just like Brady.

SpartanTarget
SpartanTarget

@CoreyLivermore @SpartanTarget It's funny, for a dude who expended a ton of energy talking about how I can't read, you apparently weren't able to pick up on the fact that I was actually insulting you. Your mother's a classy lady. An angel among women, and every day I weep for her secret shame that she has a son with a potty mouth on the Internet and a weird mad-on for Peter King.

CoreyLivermore
CoreyLivermore

@SpartanTarget @CoreyLivermore Really?  That's the best you can come up with?  Insulting my mother?  How original.  How mature.  I'm so angry.  Oh, the humanity - you resorted to the ultimate retard comeback; Hulk smash!

Serioiusly - my mother?  Can't discuss football intelligently, so you decide to insult someone's mom?  Dude, you need help.  Real class move there.

SpartanTarget
SpartanTarget

@CoreyLivermore @SpartanTarget This is pretty a pretty solid dialogue, and I'm learning a ton about proper conversation here! Last question, do you punch your mother with that mouth? Should I?

CoreyLivermore
CoreyLivermore

@SpartanTarget @CoreyLivermore Well, let's see.  You've:

1.  Put words in my mouth that I never uttered;

2. Obviously haven't read the column longer than a week, otherwise you'd know Peter is a Pats homer;

3.  Are attempting to inflame an issue that has nothing to do with you.

In my book, yes, this makes you an ass-hat and a moron.  You can't read, you want something to be there that isn't, and you make shit up to try and make yourself look better.

And now, the troll food gets put away.  I should know better than to feed you idiots.

SpartanTarget
SpartanTarget

@CoreyLivermore @SpartanTarget Wait, it doesn't work by me pointing out that you're weirdly obsessed with this idea that PK loves the Patriots and using as an example a column where he bashes Brady and just happens to not mention Rogers, then you calling me an ass-hat and a moron? 

SpartanTarget
SpartanTarget

@CoreyLivermore @SpartanTarget And yet you can't seem to comprehend that "equal treatment" would be verbally pummeling Rogers for making no-chance throws to a TE. But don't be mad, baby! I like being the pain in your ass better than being in anyone else's!

CoreyLivermore
CoreyLivermore

@SpartanTarget @CoreyLivermore Just asking for equal treatment.  But you are apparently too stupid to comprehend that, so I'll put the troll food away and let you wander off to be a pain in someone else's ass.

SpartanTarget
SpartanTarget

@CoreyLivermore @SpartanTarget So ... you're complaining that in this column, Aaron Rogers in not mentioned, because Tom Brady is mentioned in the headlines of other stories. That makes perfect, perfect sense. On a related note, I'm pretty angry that Peter King doesn't mention The Good Wife in this column, while that crappy Sleepy Hollow show is getting headline after headline in Entertainment Weekly.

CoreyLivermore
CoreyLivermore

@SpartanTarget @CoreyLivermore If you can read so well, then tell me where in the sentence "Tom Brady struggles with a bunch of no-name receivers and he gets headline after headline." do I mention that the headline was in today's column.  Well, I'm waiting...

Done waiting.  Why?  Because I never stated the headline was in today's column.  Nor did I infer or imply it.  You want to see something that isn't there so you can try to make yourself look better.

If you're going to accuse someone of something, make sure you have proof to back it up, ass-hat.

SpartanTarget
SpartanTarget

@CoreyLivermore @SpartanTarget Oh, man, where could I have gotten that "headline" thing from? You're right. My reading's not so good. My copy-pasting is much better, though. Maybe I got it from this: "Tom Brady struggles with a bunch of no-name receivers and he gets headline after headline." And I love the line "King has historically ignored everything the Packers do," like you're picking through Chaucer texts here. Sorry you're really, really upset that this lacked a platitude section about Rogers. Maybe next week he'll be terrible for an entire half of a game and King can grouse about him, too! 

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