(Tom Lynn/AP)
(Tom Lynn/AP)

Jermichael Finley: Fear. Relief. Resolve.

A first-person account of those fateful moments on the turf after a terrifying hit, and the process of recovery, both physical and emotional

The minutes Jermichael Finley spent on the Lambeau Field turf on Oct. 20, after a collision with Cleveland Browns safety Tashaun Gipson, were a suspended surreality for the Green Bay Packers tight end, his teammates and the NFL community. Finley was taken off the field on a stretcher and spent the night in the ICU of a Green Bay hospital, before being diagnosed with a spinal cord contusion that is expected to heal. A week later, Finley describes in a first-person account for The MMQB what it’s like to confront the possibility that one play could change your life.

By Jermichael Finley

Is this God punishing me? Is this Karma? This was my initial thought when I was down on the field. I felt as if everything that I had ever done wrong came crashing down at me at that one moment.

It all happened very quickly. I remember seeing the defender out of the corner of my eye, and I intentionally lowered my head and shoulders to protect my knees. After I got hit, in the fourth quarter of our win against the Browns last week, my eyes were wide open. I was very conscious, but I could not move. I looked my teammate Andrew Quarless directly in the eye and whispered, “Help me, Q. I can’t move; I can’t breathe.” The scariest moment was seeing the fear in Q’s eyes. I knew something was wrong, but his reaction verified it. That really shook me up.

I actually had feeling in my legs, but I couldn’t feel much else. On the field, the doctors were going through regular procedures, testing me on sense and touch, and asking me a multitude of questions. But because I was a little panicked, I couldn’t breathe, which made it very difficult to answer. I remember one of the doctors telling me to “close my legs,” and I simply could not. They ended up unscrewing my facemask before lifting me up on the stretcher. When I was exiting the field at Lambeau, I tried to raise my hand to give the fans a thumbs-up, but I got about halfway and couldn’t raise my arm any further. I kept asking the neurosurgeon, “Will I walk again?” His answer was a definitive, “Yes, you are moving your legs right now.” Then I asked, “Will I use my arms again? Will I play football again?” To those questions, I simply got, “I cannot answer that yet.” 

Clearly there was a problem, and I was terrified.

The scariest part was the unknown. I was having trouble breathing and speaking. I couldn’t move. I was taking all sorts of tests, and no one could give me any answers.

I was taken to the ICU at an area hospital, and the first night there was crazy. Everyone on my floor was facing life or death, while I was there more for 24-hour assistance. I didn’t even realize I was in the ICU until the doctor came in and told me, “Finley, you’re holding up ICU. You have way too many visitors, and even the patients that are on this floor want to come and meet you. We can’t have this traffic up here. It’s not safe.” I wanted to say, Bro, I am strapped to a board. What do you want me to do about it? However, I resisted the urge.

I always joke around with friends, family and teammates, and that continued. As serious as the situation was, we kept trying to laugh. That helped a ton. My wife, Courtney, came by later that night, and we just talked about life. It was a weird dynamic. People with emergencies all around me, but life just goes forward.

The scariest part of the entire scenario was the unknown. I was having trouble breathing and speaking. I couldn’t move. I was taking all sorts of tests, and no one could give me any answers. There was some concern initially that I might need an immediate spinal cord surgery. The initial CT scan came back negative Sunday night, which meant no fracture in my neck. That was obviously tremendous news, and a major blessing for my family and me.

On Monday, I began to feel much better. I had started to regain motion, and I was actually able to stand up and shower for the first time since the game. My balance and coordination were still a bit off, which was alarming, but they came back as the hours passed. My grandma and father-in-law flew in from Texas, and a couple members from IFA (my agency) came in from Minneapolis. That night, I transferred into a regular patient unit, and I think about half of my teammates and coaches came to the hospital to visit me. I felt so blessed and appreciative. I’ve certainly been through my fair share of ups and downs in Green Bay, but it was really amazing to feel the love and support from my teammates, coaches and fans during this 48-hour period. It means more to me than I could ever explain.

Finley was up and on his feet, with a little help, by the Monday after the game, and was moved out of the ICU.
Finley was up and on his feet, with a little help, by the Monday after the game, and was moved out of the ICU. (Courtesy of the Finley family)

I underwent a series of exams (CT scan, MRI, X-Ray, etc.) to determine the extent of the injury. Monday afternoon, our team doctors and my agent sent out copies to a half-dozen spine experts around the country. It may have looked like I had another concussion, after suffering one in Cincinnati last month, but it turns out the injury is what doctors have called a spinal cord contusion. The blow shocked my spine, and left me with a two-centimeter bruise on my spinal cord that should heal in time.

My medical treatment to this point has been superb, and the Packers and my agent have been working together to determine how outside medical experts view this injury, how previous cases have been handled and what the next steps of action should be. Right now, the recovery timeline is still uncertain, so we don’t know yet if this injury will end my season. Obviously the most important thing for me right now is to rest, and to let the contusion heal. After that, I will most likely go visit a handful of specialists around the country for thorough second and third evaluations of my neck and head. One thing that I know is that I am in great hands. I have a tremendous support system and this incident only made that clearer. I am blessed.

There have been a lot of reports about my off-the-field life, and my efforts to mature as a person and as a player over this past year. I’ve surrounded myself with a team of people who have helped me take the next step in my life, and while I still have room to grow, I’m in a far better place in today than I was two or three years ago. One of those areas is financially.

Of course I plan to play football again. That is what I love to do. I’ll do everything in my power to get back to the player I have been, and improve into the player I know I can be.

My agent and financial advisers have always preached the importance of disability insurance to me. As athletes, we often feel invincible, which is why it is so important to have advisers who you can trust and who can also take the emotion out of any situation. I don’t feel the pressure that I see many athletes do because I’ve taken their advice. I currently have a $10 million insurance policy in place. If this injury prevents me from ever playing football again, I will be able to collect on $10 million tax-free. For me, this is the equivalent of making another $16 million or $17 million in pre-tax salary. While money has absolutely nothing to do with my decision to play, I can sleep at night knowing that regardless of what happens, my family is financially secure forever—maybe the biggest odds I’ll ever overcome. Disability insurance is never a fun conversation, and writing those annual checks to protect myself is tough. But now, more than ever, I understand the importance of protecting yourself, protecting your family, and protecting your future earnings.

Of course I plan to play football again. This is what I love to do. I love the game. I love Sundays. Based on the feedback I’ve received from doctors at this point, the question is not if I’ll play again, but when. There is no better feeling in the world than making the “Lambeau Leap” into the stands, and I fully intend on having that surreal feeling again soon. I will do everything in my power to rehab and get back to the player I have been, and improve into the player I know I can be.

jermichael-finley-xbox-800
Jermichael’s rehab includes Xbox sessions with Kaydon. (Courtesy of the Finley family)

Do I have fear? Of course I do. It’s impossible not to have fear given what I’ve gone through over the past four weeks. I’ve worked my entire life to do what I do on that football field, and it’s a very scary feeling being taken off the field on a stretcher. No matter what’s said about drops or any off-the-field stuff, the one thing no one can question about me is how hard I work to be a great football player. I want this. I need this. It’s everything to me. It’s a scary thought knowing I could have left that field on Sunday never being able to strap up my helmet again, let alone walk.

Today, I feel better. I feel like I was in a bad car accident, but each day I’m improving. My motor skills, coordination and balance are all back to normal. I’m getting anxious sitting around all day, but I know my neck is healing. I am confident that I will be part of a new case study of players who returned to football successfully after suffering neck and head trauma. Just like we see every year with ACL recovery, anything is possible when you combine drive and commitment with a tremendous support system and team, and amazing advances in science and medicine.

Before every game I play, my 5-year-old son, Kaydon, says a prayer for my health and safety. The other day, he asked me, “Why didn’t God listen to our prayers last Sunday?” I told him that he did hear us, but sometimes God helps us in different ways. “I think you’re right Daddy,” Kaydon said. “He heard us and now he’s getting you better and healthy so you can play football again.”

jermichael-finley-td-800
Love of Sundays, Finley says, drives him to return to the field. (Brian Kersey/Getty Images)
61 comments
Whatever74
Whatever74

This was a great article and was a very articulate and personal description of one of the scariest injuries I've witnessed as a NFL and Packers fan.  J-Mike has been one of my favorite players since his second season in the NFL when it became more obvious to Packers nation just what a physical freak he really was.  6'6, 250, a ridiculously underrated blocker, and a guy who can play WR'er.  

However, this nonsense about, "hey, all of us who've played the game learned how to form tackle," is REALLY just getting obnoxious.  Great, we learned how to form tackle while playing for______High School where the game doesn't move a FRACTION as fast as it does in the NFL.  Guess what we also learned?  How to HIT guys.  How to try and HIT them so that you separated the ball from the player.  And again, even the top 99 pct of guys out there learned that and only translated that into High School, or lower level College atmospheres.  When you have someone Finley's size running a slant or down the seem, and a safety closing in as a pass happens, things happen at the blink of an eye. 

So as easy as it is for everyone to DRONE on about how "we're taught to form tackle," blah, blah, blah, it's also coming from a place of ignorance most of the time.  Sure, a DL like Ryan Pickett, or a LB'er like AJ Hawk will come up and make a form tackle on a RB in the hole.  But guys in the secondary, with guys in space...with a defender coming in a tenth of a second after the ball is caught, it's often more complicated than that.  You try to form tackle Finley running full speed, you're going to get your ass run over just as several players did when he ran a simple out and broke 4 tackles at the start of the Browns game. 

What's more, everyone talking about how safe High School football is, you're far more likely to get a concussion playing HIGH SCHOOL football than in college or the NFL.  Don't get me wrong, I'm not advocating for the Brandon Meriweather type of player and his cheap shots out there, but for people who think it's just easy to go back and tackle like you were taught in 3rd-4th grade or whenever you started, it's simply not possible in many situations and it's not what you're taught to do in many situations.  Just look at how Finley was when he got hit.  That massive, massive human being was in a ball.  There was no target.  And he went from being on his feet, to balled up in a split second.  Tayson Gipson from the Browns did absolutely nothing wrong, and aside from JerMichael Finley, I feel the worst for him.  


Can't wait to see Finley jumping into the stands at Lambeau.  More importantly I'm thrilled to hear he's back playing with his kids and being a father.

ayaz.haniffa
ayaz.haniffa

Hey J-Mike - get well soon and pray that you will have a quick recovery man...support from a long time Viking fan.

graggc
graggc

Dear Mr. Finley, I have been where you have been and I understand the abject horror one feels when in the helpless 'not knowing' phase. I broke my neck the day after Presidents Day in 2000 tripping over, of all things, a cat playing at the top of long flight of concrete and steel stairs. Life can and often does turn on a dime! I awoke in the ambulance unable to breathe and terrified that I couldn't move. I passed out several times until reaching the hospital and barely recall all the horrible things my doctors were telling me. It's a very long story but 13 years later and after countless surgeries I'm still "recovering". Bottom line, please try with all your strength to maintain your positive attitude and please, please listen to your neurosurgeons, your family and those that you trust literally with your life. I wish you nothing but the best. Keep smiling, keep laughing and take on this injury as you've taken on all the other obstacles in your life and I'm sure you'll be just fine...

ScottInWisconsin
ScottInWisconsin

For those of us who played football at any level growing up (middle or high school) when were we ever taught to lead with our head? I understand that for some defensive players it's gotten a lot harder because if a receiver or running back lowers their head and you're going in for the tackle, there's not much you can do. The league and the player's union ought to take out disability insurance on all the players, or at least help defray a lot of the costs. Finley had great representation and advice; luckily he has his insurance. Other players are not so fortunate. Get well Fin!! 

wmchain
wmchain

Thank you for sharing this story J-Mike. This Packer fan is looking forward to seeing you do the Lambeau Leap again in the near future.

LarryLemanski
LarryLemanski

We'll be glad to have you back. Recover well.

skorczeb
skorczeb

Your friends at Grand Central Station-West thank you and pray that you recover soon.  We miss you! 

Yerk
Yerk

A lot of you are correct, it isn't helmet-to-helmet at all and if the helmets did hit, it was a majority of Finley's fault (as he said, he lowered his head/shoulders to protect his knees). However, its nowhere close to a form tackle. If you have good coaches...you are taught how to tackle from day 1.

There are very few defensive players in the NFL that have lost the ability (or never had the ability) to form tackle and mostly, its these tiny DBs. Launching your body, head down, arms to your side is going to get you or the offensive player hurt. During this play, Finley was already wrapped up and sure, maybe he could have broken the tackle. But if players are so aware and want to make the game safer, why not just tackle Finley in this situation? Why take the risk of injuring yourself, the ball carrier or even your own teammate who has the player wrapped up?

Brandon Meriweather (moron) is going to be a perfect example of this. Because the dude is getting fined/suspended for hitting high, he is going to take his launching (what he thinks is tackling) to the knees. Why? Where you never taught how to tackle someone? What happened to hitting and wrapping someone on the torso? Anyways...

Go back to the basics, learn how to tackle and chances are there won't be these types of injuries occurring. 

Also, to those bashing Finley about his faith. Stop. There is no room for you to question someone else's faith...especially his child's faith during a time like this. Grow up.

Just my two cents...

ScottBerns
ScottBerns

"suspended surreality" Gotta' love English as a second language.

EricJohnson1
EricJohnson1

I remember that hit. I had to turn the TV off. Call me a wimp, truth there, said before, couldn't work in an emergency room. But don't like all the damn injuries. I played, was recruited by smaller D1 colleges. Loved the game. Running from someone on a field is so much fun. But after that hit I thought about some rule changes for receivers going over the middle, not sure what it would be, but say between the hash marks, that's a flag football? zone or something. I don't know what. People more knowledgeable and creative could generate some rule changes to protect receivers more. Think it's just a matter of time until there's a death on the field per the new physics of speed, power, mass of the new players. Yes, there's risk in everything, but we try to minimize risk. It's just not the same game as 1963, again per the new impact math of bigger, faster, stronger players. 

All the best to thee Mr. Finley. Hope you recover fully. And I would add you have nothing to prove to anyone. Do what you need to do. And thanks for the emotional honesty in your writing.

yardog59
yardog59

The man should walk away while he still has the ability to do so.

Bucky182
Bucky182

Not really sure how people are getting upset and misinterpreting the God reference with his son. Completely missing the point. He's saying that he got hurt but that he'll be okay and play football again. God answered his son's prayer because his dad does not have a debilitating injury. He can play the game he loves again. I thought that was pretty obvious but maybe I was wrong.

Mikerw00
Mikerw00

Are you kidding me. This has anything to do with god. How totally moronic. If there is a god, for which there is no proof, to think that god gives a rats a$$ about a particular sports play is a laughable fantasy.

Also, as a general rule disability insurance pays income, not a lump sum. 

Bubba_deHubbada
Bubba_deHubbada

Any insurance experts on here?  Does a disability insurance claim have to be explicitly linked to a specific incident (such as a play on which a major, career-ending injury is sustained), or can the same insurance cover a retired athlete who can establish credible medical proof that a chronic post-career disability was caused by playing football?  If the answer to the latter question is "no," then is it up to the athlete (and hopefully the conscience of the athlete's agent) to lay money away in the event of post-career disability?


Nice article

ianlinross
ianlinross

Here's hoping he's able to fully recover and gets back on the field at Lambeau. He'll get a  huge ovation from Packerland.

But next time, don't lower your head!

DavidFoureyes
DavidFoureyes

So happy to have this adult as a Packer and I hope he heals and gets back to what he loves quickly! I wasn't a huge YOLO-era Jermichael fan as it belied an immaturity that Finley appears to have recognized himself and addressed. Good for him on knowing he is responsible for himself...no one else is going to be, which brings me to: 

This scenario in which (according to Finley) god allowed Jermichael's neck to be broken so it could heal so he could play football? Couldn't god have just not let his neck get broken? Presumably Jermichael's kid didn't specifically ask for his dad's neck not to get broken, ok...god is a dick who loves semantics perhaps, but some day that kid is going to be 12, and that kid is going to read this and think, "What the hell is this shit? God didn't answer my prayers so my dad could fix his neck to go back to the thing that broke his neck?". Or he'll make a different excuse for why gods don't answer prayers I guess. 

The bigger existential question is: Doesn't JerJesus know it's Finley's contract year?

david1956
david1956

It is gratifying to know Finley has taken out a US$10M disability insurance. That should have calm him down a little, knowing that even if he might lost his earning capability his family will not face devastating financial blow (he was told that he could walk while being taken off the field, per his writing). Hats off to him, his agent and financial advisers.  Given the nature of the sport, young players, especialy those whom has yet to play out his "peak" contract, should learnt from this. I don't know know how much Finley paid for the coverage (he said it is tough to write those cheques), NFLPA and NFL should work on making this kind of coverage a meaningful and financially sensible proposal to all players.

Joe50
Joe50

It was a very stupid looking tackle.  A lot of other players do it, but his arms are by his side and he's leading with his head.  I can guarantee you he wouldn't tackle like that if he didn't have a helmet on.  Ironically, the concussion problem is BECAUSE of the helmet ( although I don't know if Finley had a concussion also). 

endonesia89
endonesia89

jermichael u the man. stay positive god will see you through you'll be back to your regular dominant self soon!

theMMQB
theMMQB moderator

Mark Mravic here, one of the editors at The MMQB. I have watched the video multiple times on NFL Rewind from numerous angles and believe there was contact between Finley's and Gipson's helmets (not that Gipson intended a helmet hit; he is going in with the shoulder and Finley, as he himself says, lowers his head into the blow). But because it is not 100% clear, we have edited the reference so that the characterization does not distract from the story as a whole. 

Also, as always please keep the tone civil in the comments. 



cdizzle
cdizzle

I don't get the controversy on this page.  I watched this video several times and it looks like an unfortunate helmet-to-helmet collision to me.  Watch the way Tashaun Gipson's head snaps away after the collision.  Additionally, this article in no way demonizes Gipson's play.  In fact, Mr. Finley admits that he lowered his head to meet the tackle.  What are you complaining about?  

I'd like to go as far as to suggest that this article has nothing to do with highlighting head shots, helmet-to-helmet hits, etc.  This article is about how football players are real people with real hopes, real fears and real emotions.  If anything the purpose is to highlight how quickly things and lives can change on the football field, and that perhaps these football players are more vulnerable than you or me.  Their grasp of success or greatness is tenuous and can vanish in an instant.

ChicagoBob
ChicagoBob

Judging by these comments, there sure are a lot of angry people in this world. 

Get better, Jermichael.  I can't imagine going through this sort of situation.  Thanks for sharing.

BaileyLaBerge
BaileyLaBerge

I am sorry but that wasn't head to head but that was a head shot you can't say it wasn't because when you watch the replay he aimed for the head so don't say any crap that "OMG THAT WASN"T A HEADSHOT" because it WAS a head shot. people at the game saw it why can't you stupid idiots see it.

WontT
WontT

WHO*IS*ESPN - You're an idiot.  Take your stupid political rant elsewhere.  People wonder why athletes don't open up and say much is because of the people who post crap like you and some of the other posts here.  Take the other idiots with you who bash this article, guy tells what he went thru in a life threatening moment and you bash him.  Classy.  Go to FOX news to spew your crap.  If you don't like it don't read it.  Not a Packer fan but this was a great read.  Best of luck Jermichael.

kewlbri125
kewlbri125

Excellent story. We always hear about injuries, but never hear about what people do to overcome them and get back on the field. It was nice to see that perspective.

AndyStewart
AndyStewart

wow do you meatheads TOTALLY miss the point of this--helmet-to-helmet or not it was a head shot. As someone who sustained a permanent spinal-injury trust me J.F. is totally within his senses to have been afraid and it seems like he has learned a lot from this experience. Trust me, money has NOTHING to do with the majority of challenges in this scenario.

WHO*IS*ESPN
WHO*IS*ESPN

um, NO God doesn't punish football players and of course you'll play again. You need the money and this is all you can do. Stop the dramatic soap opera.  Why not look at  veterans who have lost a limb or eye in WAR, coming home to NOTHING obama does for them and then you can cry "poor me".

Brian116
Brian116

@ScottInWisconsin you are a moron!  Finley even says in his letter that he dropped his head and shoulders to protect his knees.  When the defensive player is aiming for a guys waist with his shoulder pads and the offensive player dips to protect his lower body there will always be helmet to helmet collisions.  The only difference today is that guys are huge.  Stop the hgh and steroid use in the NFL and college and you will see the amount of concussions reduced.  Take out disability insurance is such a stupid comment it doesn't deserve a response!

ModernThrowback
ModernThrowback

@Yerk First, form tackling is not always a matter of "yes I will" or "no I won't", especially at the speed of the NFL game. These guys are all but flying anymore--they're so fast. Second, look at the size difference between Finley and Gipson, and at Gipson's positioning in the photo of pre-impact. Clearly, he is aiming his shoulder low to try and "body block" Finley on his lower half--and not with the intent to injure. If Gipson had tried to "form tackle" Finley at this point, he would have been crushed and possibly injured. From personal experience playing years of football as a smaller player, this is the only way you can take on guys that outweigh you by 50 pounds. Know how to do that and you both survive to play another down, or you become part of his highlight reel and get either benched or carried off the field.

ShermanShermanov
ShermanShermanov

@ScottBerns It's in webster's and that's actually proper usage. Should Jermichael ever start an English class (he's obviously more qualified than you are...) you should be the first to sign up. 

ctm1449
ctm1449

@EricJohnson1 Thanks for the emotional honesty in your writing as well, Eric. The tone of this post represents the best of what article comments could be, but rarely are. And here's to you, Finley. I don't know how much you had a ghostwriter help out with this piece, but it's well-done, and demonstrates your newfound maturity. As to you, SI: There's something very honest about actually publishing photos of a player, in the hospital, wearing a neck brace. That's journalism, not fluff.  

Bubba_deHubbada
Bubba_deHubbada

@EricJohnson1 Yeah, it's amazing that he says he used his head to protect his knees, and the way I read it I wouldn't necessarily conclude that he was trying to set up some kind of argument to protect receivers' knees, he was just saying what he did.  If he wanted to argue a rules change he could have done it later in the article, but he didn't.

For any human to make a split-second decision that one's head is less valuable than one's knees...wow.  That's a mental calculus that I just can't imagine.

beekay31
beekay31

@yardog59 If doctors determine, once healed, that he has no more risk than any other football player, why shouldn't he return to play?  I'm sure Finley will take the advice of his physicians and not two Bears fans.

DavidFoureyes
DavidFoureyes

@Bucky182 First of all, the jury is still out on whether or not the injury ended Finley's carrier. I presume his kid's prayer wasn't, "please don't let my dad be injured so badly he is debilitated and can never play again" it was likely, "please don't let my dad get injured." His dad got injured.

The difficulty is that when Finley effectively tells his son, "though you asked god I not be injured, god's plan was that I be injured, heal, then play football again so that you can continue to watch me evade life-threatening injuries" what is the difference between this, and not doing anything? If I were this kid, I would be petrified that if I prayed my dad not die, god would make it happen anyway to teach me something...I guess the same lesson about how futile praying is. 

Obviously we all believe a little differently, however it seems to me this would have been a better opportunity to teach the kid about modern medicine and the power of Finley's conditioning and hard work that perhaps saved his life...not the circular logic that was the result of some words whispered into the side of a bed.

Yerk
Yerk

@Mikerw00 There isn't room for you to question one's faith or how they deal with things. You sound like the moron.

gabriel.cheney
gabriel.cheney

@Mikerw00 man this isnt about you. Besides what proof do you have that you are real because someone else said so that does not make it real. All that means is that you believe in man more than anything else you need to respect Finley for doing this he could have left us all in the dark and not known anything you are like most people all about yourself. Grow up. God is real and prove me wrong. FInley I am glad you are safe and look forward to seeing you play again.

MPR
MPR

@Bubba_deHubbada on Monday, you can schedule a time to discuss with -Frank N. Darras, the nations top disability insurance lawyer. He can give you a free consultation -- www.darraslaw.com  800-458-4577 is the office number.  Tell them

Robin Nolan told you to call him. 

JamesBizzo
JamesBizzo

@Bubba_deHubbada Good question. While I don't write policies on professional athletes, the general theme of disability remains the same.  For your first question, he would need to be disabled to a point where he can no longer continue his job.  So for Finley that could be one major injury (which this has the potential to be) or it could be a series of injuries that finally derails him.  Secondly, the insured (Finley) would need to still be an active football player for his benefits to kick in. If he is done playing football, there's no active income for him to protect and therefore he wouldn't need the policy; the point of disability insurance is to replace the income.  These comments from Finley are a bit shocking to me because they seem to imply that many of these NFL players don't have the insurance, which is pure madness if you ask me.

AndyStewart
AndyStewart

@theMMQB It's a great piece Mark and speaking from my own experiences it does complete justice to those incredibly haunting moments and hours after. Life moves as fast as football and I'm glad J.F. is taking the critical lessons this incident affords him to heart. Here's to a full and speedy recovery. Thanks and keep up the great work.

Jeff63
Jeff63

@BaileyLaBerge Punctuation, d-bag. Learn it. 

It was helmet-to-helmet because Finley lowered his head. The defender was aiming shoulder-high with his head down. Nobody could have adjusted to Finley lowering his head. 

Greg15
Greg15

@WHO*IS*ESPN I thank God for our veterans. But not everybody is a veteran. Everybody goes through trials in their lives. But you are condemning somebody who is going through a trial and you are comparing him to our normal lives. You can't do that...it makes no sense. Everybody has certain skills which they follow to give them the best life possible. That is simply what J.F. has been doing and hopefully will continue to do.

BouncerDave
BouncerDave

@WHO*IS*ESPN Since we're talking about "all you can do", a lot of people in the military are there because that's all they can do. Due to either lack of mental capacity or physical ability, with some exceptions of course. Um, he said nothing about being punished by god to make that clear for you. This injury could have been a life-altering event that could have left him paralyzed. Would you say the same thing to a family that almost lost their lives to a car accident? The point is, it was scary. Think a little before your simple god-fearing mind speaks.

TheSconnieNation
TheSconnieNation

@WHO*IS*ESPN You sound like the "poor me" person.  If it makes you this upset, why did you read it?  Were you forced to?  Nope, just a negative Nancy.  

Whatever74
Whatever74

No, the ignorance here is all on your part there Brian.  In fact, I'm almost at a loss trying to reconcille how someone can make such an asinine statement.  People across all walks of life should have some type of long term health care, but if you're a professional player who's literally one play away every single snap from having a potentially devastating injury, to not have it would be asinine.  

Second, your steroids and hgh comments are what is truly pathetic here.  Please show ANYTHING to support your claims before you go spouting off.  

Bottom line, it is great to hear that JerMichael Finley has a safety net in place to provide for his family as that is an incredibly wise use of his money.  It's that much better that he doesn't need it obviously as he's a father, husband, son and all of the important things first as well as a great football player on the team that I've loved since I was 4 years old.  I guess I didn't think there was a single word from ScottinWisconsin that anyone could have disputed, but as always, I underestimate the stupidity, the ignorance and just how feerless those people are to share their opinions.  You're a clown. 


MarkBritten
MarkBritten

@beekay31 @yardog59 I don't think he necessarily SHOULD walk away (that's his choice), but would anyone blame him if he did?

JoshChrenko
JoshChrenko

 @DavidFoureyes @Bucky182 "not the circular logic that was the result of some words whispered into the side of a bed." I take it that you're an atheist....Finley is obviously not. Why would you try to comment on how someone chooses to bring up their children?  I know that you are probably like most atheists, and think that you are more intelligent than anyone who believes in God....typical.

RDerekP
RDerekP

@JamesBizzo @Bubba_deHubbada I suspect they don't have the insurance because the premiums are incredibly expensive given the violence of the game and the amount of the salary. But I agree. I wonder if the NFLPA and the NFL could do something about getting a group policy for everyone playing or if that would be prohibitively expensive. But it may be something that would help isolate the NFL against future lawsuits like the concussion one.

AndyStewart
AndyStewart

@BouncerDave @WHO*IS*ESPN actually he did wonder if this was God punishing him--but as someone who broke his neck when he was 19, let me tell you--that's a pretty normal thing to think/wonder in that situation--it's part of the "why is this happening?" reasoning. As for soldiers, who I respect to the fullest, they make a choice as do athletes to participate in a dangerous endeavor and let me tell you, while I wouldn't wish this lifestyle on anyone, they are treated to some of the best medical/rehab treatment available--as they damn well should be. If you've never sustained an injury of this magnitude--shut your mouth and wish the man well.

Ebullient
Ebullient

@TheSconnieNation @WHO*IS*ESPN  You got sucked into feeding the troll.  Don't do that.  I believe I've seen that screen name before, and that person does this sort of thing frequently here.  

Whatever74
Whatever74

Oh, by the way, I ALWAYS love when people start off a comment by saying, "your a moron."  Nice job opening up with an insult about someone's intelligence while not being able to make it one single word without a pretty egregious spelling mistake.  For the record, YOU'RE a moron "Bri."

Terry
Terry

@Ebullient @TheSconnieNation @WHO*IS*ESPN 

Indeed, this being is a cancer on this site.

I hope SI.Com will ban him like ESPN did. He's got a lot of emotional issues and this isn't the place to air them out or fix them.

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