David Eulitt/Getty Images
David Eulitt/Getty Images

Michael Sam: Studying the Game Tape

We’re learning about Michael Sam the man. But what about Michael Sam the player? We watched every snap he played in 12 games for Missouri last fall to get an unfiltered look at the 2014 draft prospect. Here's what we found

By
Greg A. Bedard
· More from Greg·

From now until the opening of training camps, The MMQB will run a series of our Greatest Hits from the site’s first year. From April, Greg Bedard hits the film room to get to the heart of Michael Sam’s draft stock…

I knew very little about Michael Sam until Sunday night, when the draft-bound Missouri defensive end announced he is gay. (I don’t have time to watch much college football during the NFL season aside from a few big games here and there.) I read a few of the stories about his announcement, but that was the extent of my knowledge about Sam.

On Monday morning, my boss, Peter King, called with an edict: “Don’t talk to any scouts or general managers. Just find as much tape as you can on Michael Sam, watch it and write what you think.”

Several hours, 12 games and 922 Missouri defensive snaps later (I couldn’t get my hands on the Indiana and Kentucky games), I feel I have a firm grasp on the 6-1 ½, 260-pound Michael Sam, NFL draft prospect. Film doesn’t care whether you’re gay or straight, black or magenta: You are what you show on the field.

Here’s what I learned:

He plays hard. When Sam is on the field, he’s always engaged and plays to the whistle. Even though that aspect of his game isn’t extraordinary (other players have higher motors), it’s a solid NFL foundation. However, there is one important aspect to consider: Missouri plays with a strict defensive line rotation. Sam played 58 percent of the snaps in the 12 games I watched. That’s a bit of a double-edged sword, depending on your point of view. On one hand you could say that Sam could have put up even better stats than his 11.5 sacks and 7.5 additional tackles for a loss if the rotation weren’t so strict. On the other hand you could say, “Well, he should put up those kinds of stats and play to the whistle since he plays less than NFL starters. He received more than enough rest during a game.” I lean towards the latter because …

Missouri’s defense has better players than Sam. If Sam was a standout, you would see the Missouri coaches break from the rotation late in the game to get the best players on the field. That didn’t happen, and it stood out in the must-win finale against Texas A&M. On the Aggies’ final three possessions in a 21-21 game, Sam played five of nine snaps. It could be argued that Sam is the fourth-best pass rush prospect on the Tigers. Right end Kony Ealy, who could be a top-10 pick this year, drew much more attention from offenses and had to face the opponent’s best tackle, on the left side of the offensive line. Markus Golden, Sam’s backup on the left side, will be drafted higher than Sam when he enters the draft a year from now. Golden could be a star. He is more athletic and faster than Sam, and watching the Tigers play, I thought Golden was better. There could be other factors as to why he played behind Sam, including Sam’s leadership and smarts. Or perhaps the Missouri coaches didn’t want Golden, a junior-college transfer, to start, in order to increase his chances of staying another season. Sophomore Shane Ray is also more athletic than Sam, a quality valued on special teams at the next level. Same goes for senior end/outside linebacker Brayden Burnett.

In his final five games plus 40 snaps against Oklahoma State—the best competition Sam faced all season—he had no splash plays. The right tackles he faced in that stretch were more of what he will see in the pros.

Sam produced big time, but… There’s no question that Sam had major production this season, as he led the SEC in sacks and  tackles for a loss (which includes sacks). This is probably why he was named SEC defensive player of the year by the media, and co-DPOY (with Alabama linebacker C.J. Mosley) by the coaches. However, you have to look at the circumstances of his production. Namely, most of it came in three games of a four-game stretch against inferior competition: Arkansas State (three sacks), Vanderbilt (three sacks) and Florida (three sacks). Sam had a total of a half-sack in his final six games, until he made a huge play on basically the final play of the Cotton Bowl. As Oklahoma State was driving for a game-tying field goal or game-winning touchdown, Sam made a sack-strip that was returned by Ray for a touchdown. Sam beat right tackle Chris Grishby, who took a false step and was a beat late coming out of his stance. Of the 12 games I watched it was by far the biggest play Sam made all season. (The half-sack Sam had against Texas A&M would not be counted as such in the NFL: Aggie quarterback Johnny Manziel left the pocket, although not on a designed run, and clearly had become a runner. The “sack” was mostly made by Ealy and Matt Hoch, with Sam coming in late.)

So basically in his final five games plus 40 snaps against Oklahoma State—the best competition Sam faced all season—he had no splash plays. The right tackles he faced (as a left end he didn’t go against Texas A&M left tackle Jake Matthews, a projected top-10 pick) in that stretch were more of what he will see in the pros. The right tackles he beat up to gain his production likely wouldn’t be on NFL training-camp rosters. Four of his sacks came with lesser opponents desperate and behind by large margins in the fourth quarter, in obvious passing situations. In addition, Florida’s offensive line was one of the worst I’ve ever seen. Lastly: Sam’s sack against South Carolina in overtime was on an unblocked stunt.

He lacks pass rush moves. As a pass rusher, Sam has one move: a decent, if inconsistent, first step, with a little giddy-up so he can get home on a straight line either around the edge or on a quick stunt inside. But if he’s pushed around in the slightest off the ball, he doesn’t make plays, because—from what I saw—he doesn’t have a good counter move. Of his first 10 sacks of the season, only once was he engaged with a blocker and defeated him (first sack against Vanderbilt). The rest were seven speed rushes around the end against inferior competition, and two when he wasn’t blocked. Sam showed little ability to convert speed to power on his rush, which is one of the most important traits in a good NFL rusher: speed to gain leverage and then the strength to win the play after that. I do think he has some of that somewhere—Sam plays with strong hands and shows good functional strength—but it’s going to have to be developed by a good NFL defensive line coach. He has two pass-rush techniques he incorporates: a dip on the edge, and the occasional hand slap of the tackle. He will need more to succeed in the NFL.

Part of Sam’s limitation with the pass rush is he doesn’t play with a natural instinct for the ball. He’s very good at being assignment-sure and in the right spot immediately after the snap, indicating he takes coaching well, but after that the game does not appear to come naturally to him. It’s a constant theme on tape that he often falls for zone-read play-fakes and also struggles to diagnose screens. A player with limited athletic ability can be a viable player if he has exceptional awareness and instincts, but that does not show up on tape for Sam.

Sam had three sacks against the Gators, who allowed 27 in 12 games and fired their offensive line coach after their season. (Jamie Squire/Getty Images)
Sam had three sacks against the Gators, who allowed 27 in 12 games and fired their offensive line coach after the season. (Jamie Squire/Getty Images)

He doesn’t have an obvious NFL position. To me, Sam looked below average against the run. He can’t get off blocks when engaged, and I saw him get cut several times by offensive linemen. For that reason it’s tough to see him as a 4-3 end. Against Auburn, a premier team, Sam was often blocked, and effectively, by a fullback. That’s a bad sign if Sam is going to have to convert to standup linebacker in the NFL. Plus, rookies in the NFL most often have to be special-team stalwarts, and those are most often very good athletes. The marginal athleticism that I saw will be a problem in Sam’s fight to earn a roster spot.

His most successful path to long-term NFL employment could be as a developmental prospect via the practice squad if a team thinks he can make the transition from 4-3 end to 3-4 outside linebacker. I don’t see him as a 4-3 end because of his size, stiffness as an athlete and inability to defeat blocks against the run. I also believe Sam does have some potential (if a team would like him to cut a little weight and work extensively with him) as a possible two-down inside linebacker in the 3-4 defense. Maybe he could convert on third down to a pass-rusher on the defensive line. That’s a big projection to make for a draft pick. Some of his most impressive plays happened earlier in the season when he occasionally was used inside at defensive tackle and showed a knack for beating guards with his quickness. So Sam does have some positional versatility if a team is able to work with him and hone his skills.

Sam’s body type reminds me of three NFL players. In terms of body type, Sam reminds me of three players: LaMarr Woodley (Steelers), Terrell Suggs (Ravens) and Trent Cole (Eagles). Those are very good models. All three are 3-4 outside linebackers, and they exceeded 4.7 seconds in the 40-yard dash. Sam is expected to run in the 4.7 range at the Scouting Combine or his on-campus workout—perhaps as high as a 4.8. Playing those positions is not all about how fast you can run. However, what made Woodley (second round in 2007) and Cole (fifth round in ’05) stand out was their short-area quickness. Woodley (4.42) and Cole (4.22) ran very good times in the short 20-yard shuttle. If Sam can show that at the combine (his film indicates he will not) then he has potential to make it on the next level.

There’s a saying in the NFL: It only takes one team. One team that sees Sam’s ability better than I do, one team that believes his courage is a trait that can help their team. 

It’s almost unfair to mention Suggs’ name in this conversation as the 10th overall pick in ’03, for several reasons: he plays with outstanding strength (especially against the run) and his production at Arizona State was phenomenal. But he did run a 4.84 in the 40-yard dash, so it’s an example of speed not mattering. And if Sam is to make it in the NFL, he’s going to have to be that kind of strong-at-the-point-of-attack player who can get home on the pass rush.

More on Michael Sam

Former NFL player Wade Davis on what Sam’s announcement means for football, and for LGBT athletes. FULL STORY


Peter King on initial reactions. FULL STORY


Andrew Brandt on the front-office view. FULL STORY

My conclusion. Sam was a good player for one season in college. He was productive, so the accolades he received were earned. But being a good college player and becoming a good NFL player are two different things (see Tim Tebow). Sam did well for Missouri with a lot of talent around him. A majority of his production came in three games against inferior competition without a need to show much of a pass-rushing repertoire. He doesn’t show much of what the NFL looks for on special teams, and it’s difficult to project a position for him on the next level. For those reasons, Sam would project to be no better than a mid- to late-round pick. He could go undrafted. To my eyes Sam is decidedly average, with nothing exceptional about his game—though he will be helped by the fact that this draft is not deep with pass rushers, and those are always needed.

But there’s a saying in the NFL: It only takes one team. One team that sees Sam’s ability better than I do, one team that believes that his courage in announcing he is gay before the NFL Scouting Combine is a trait that can help them. On draft weekend, nothing is a surprise. And draft position doesn’t really matter all that much; many undrafted players go on to have long and successful NFL careers. They just need to land in the right situation, with the right coaches, to unlock their potential. It’s happened before, and famously with undersized defensive players like London Fletcher. I don’t see it, but it could happen with Sam.

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335 comments
inquiry.response.team
inquiry.response.team

Interesting article. Sam's "success" is the MIZZOU football template shamelessly exploited by AD Mike Alden and head coach Gary Pinkle and enthusiastically embraced by MIZZOU nation - pad the team's non-conference schedule with weak Division 1A and 1AA and laugh all the way to the bank while rarely beating a ranked team or never winning the conference.

FredFlintsone
FredFlintsone

Pretty sure NFL scouts watched him and his line get run over in Atlanta by the  Auburn offensive line during the SEC title game

Southernpike
Southernpike

Is he good enough to play on Sundays? Just play football. It's a game. Its not like this guy was picked to lead the Southern Baptist Convention. I could care less what he does in his personal life. But I doubt that he'll be signed by Nike (Just do it) or coca cola (Coming Together)

TanzimAhmed
TanzimAhmed

Everybody come check out my site thepigskincolumn.wordpress.com . For those of you interested in the draft I just evaluated Teddy Bridgewater.

trupelott
trupelott

What authority is Bedard? Is he an NFL scout undercover? A former NFL player? I guess he thinks highly of himself to make such grand pronouncements. Another armchair critic, Get a life.

pk_sea
pk_sea

So in other words, hang on to this article. If Sam doesn't get drafted, everyone will yell that it's because he's gay and the nfl is homophobic when in reality, Sam may not be the best player to draft. 

pdw3332
pdw3332

I don't have a dog in this fight.  I am not a big college football fan, I don't hate gays and I don't think Bedard is necessarily qualified to "scout" a player, since he has never been a scout.  Having said that, blame Peter King for putting Bedard in the position to issue a scouting evaluation.  What is foolish, is how all the people who automatically jump to the conclusion Bedard is tearing Sam down.  Grow up and act as tolerant as you probably think you do.  

kingwhat
kingwhat

Boy, Greg do we miss reading your thoughtful, insightful and well researched pieces in the Globe.  You were a full symphony orchestra instead of the 2nd fiddle we have now have to endure.

wlewisiii
wlewisiii

How nice. One of those pretend objective articles that the bashers will be able to use to their hearts content. I'm sure you're very proud of yourself, Mr. Bedard. 

floorme1955
floorme1955

Seems like Sam's is a late mid to late rounder- I thought his best chance was to catch on as as special teams player and a back up OSLB-  or being selected and learning the 3-4-- but Bedard addressed the Special teams specifically-- 


So- did Sam's know his NFL stock was very VERY low - and that coming out would either provide pressure on the NFL to show the world that it is being progressive- OR has he placed himself in the default position to be the poster child of GAY VICTIMHOOD? I'm sure I don't know, but if I'm him and really want to play in the NFL-- He better be working to improve his 40 to a 4.4

gphotopoulos
gphotopoulos

I respect Mr.Bedard's opinion (and that's not an oblique way of saying I disagree with it, as I haven't watched tape of Mr. Sam, or have specialized knowledge regarding football player evaluation), however I strongly disagree with the assertion that "Missouri's defense has better players than Sam". Better talents, better prospects, better athletes, maybe. But a player is someone who plays a sport, and in a team sport that means the person deemed more effective (within the team framework) by the coach (who has full authority and full responsibility). Mr.Sam was starting so he is a better player than his backup. Mr.Sam was also voted DPOY by two separate bodies so by consensus he was tied for best PLAYER in the entire conference. Obviously, the point that Mr.Bedard was trying to make was that there are better prospects, or better future NFL players in Missouri's defense, which I won't argue with, but I think his choice of words was poor.

JamesFallen
JamesFallen

For a SEC Defensive Player of the Year, you make Michael Sam out to be a less-than-average player on a team where most of his teammates are better and he only made plays (against inferior teams only) because of their presence.  Did his teammates make plays because of his presence?  You made excuses for his achievements and did not miss an opportunity to emphasize his weaknesses.  Even when comparing him to current NFL players (Suggs,  Woodley), you went out of your way to add caveats.


You said being good in college is not the same as being good in the NFL.  And you gave Tim Tebow as an example.  What about Tom Brady?  Or Russell Wilson?  Cherry picking at its finest.


This is not a fair and balanced article.  You are right in one respect  - film doesn't not care if you are gay or straight.  Do you? You should be ashamed.

Mike26
Mike26

People should STOP comparing Michael Sam to Jackie Robinson.  The differences between the issues these two players faced (Robinson) vs. MAYBE will face (Sam) are just as wide as the gap between the abilities of each player in their chosen field.  Robinson was an elite-skilled baseball player and athlete - and his character was beyond reproach.  Sam is likely a mid-level draftable player who's character to this point seems to be strong but has yet to be truly tested (and likely never will as stringently and harshly as Robinson's was 70 years ago); he's light-years from being the elite prospect that Robinson was for much of his career.  


On the flip side, Sam clearly equals Robinson in one aspect:  both are/were African-Americans.

ApolloOne
ApolloOne

Behold! Greg Bedard hates gays!

</sarcasm>

rh2000
rh2000

Sam don't belong in the NFL as an elite player!  He might make it as a special teams player.  But that's about it, why bring in all the media hoopla for an average player?  

Fox
Fox

Interpretation?  He won't be drafted.

GaloofvonDorkmeister
GaloofvonDorkmeister

What would really be interesting is Bedard traveling back in time and writing a similar article about Jackie Robinson.


I'm sure Bedard would come to the same conclusion: Robinson is a average to good player in the Negro League but certainly not MLB quality.

JJ72
JJ72

I must admit to being pleasantly surprised by the objectivity of this article, not that I want to see Sam fail or any thing but most of the articles of late have seemed more sales pitches for a life style than a football player.  I too knew nothing of Sam until his announcement.  I have no idea if he is good enough for the NFL or not but the media suddenly began soaking him with accolades of greatness as a potential late first round pick the instant he made his announcement.  I couldn't help but wonder why then that was the first I'd heard of him.  If he is that good then he should be praised but I wonder how much of the praise is actually for his football prowess.  I think Sam may well be a victim of over-expectations which could ultimately hurt his chances at a successful career.  That would be a shame for any athlete to be placed on a pedestal and held to standards beyond not only themselves but most others as well.  Time will tell and I wish him well, but in the end his success must be on the football field, and not based on his choices of non-football related life-styles.  His sexual orientation is irrelevant to his football skills and he should be rated on his skills alone for good or bad.

leon1376
leon1376

I hope Same gets drafted. That way, we'll be treated to 100% wall-to-wall gayness by ESPN. How utterly cool will that be?  I cannot wait for ESPN to interview the mother of the first little 6th Grade boy to "come out" by wearing Sam's jersey to school. His mother will say how proud she is of her gay son. Think of all the little boys who will self-identify with Sam's jersey. 

peter.io
peter.io

So Mr. Sam is gay... so what? I don't care who any of the other players in the NFL hold hands with so why should this be any different? Bottom line, I wish Mr. Sam happiness and hope that he goes on to as much success as a player in the NFL as his talent and ability justifies.


Period.

negotiatorcmcr
negotiatorcmcr

One scout or GM Peter King said the same thing Bedard did, that Sam isn't that strong a talent. He may not be. He did put up excellent numbers but disappeared, according to Bedard. It will be interesting to see how he pans out. All he has to do is keep quiet, train hard, be a good teammate and produce some how, either on special teams or as a backup and he'll be respected.

Rick in Huahin!
Rick in Huahin!

So coz he's gay we now have to analyze every move to see if he is worthy?


As an added note, why is it that be it the military or sports, gay people are assumed that they want to have sex  or come on to others? 

Gays have this oversexed libido and heteros dont? Seems heteros have a bigger problem controlling themselves than gays, just look at the military and their male/female sexual assault problems.

And now the locker room is worried about the same, that a players wants to have sex with all their teammates??


its all just so absurd!!!!!!

qdog112
qdog112

So let me get this straight. Sam was 1st team All-America, POY in the SEC (the best conference in the world) and there were 4 other players on his defense that were better? So the All-America selection committee and the SEC voters both got it wrong and you, Mr. Bedard have it right? Yeah, OK. 


Sir, you may step down. Now go piss in the cup.

Mike26
Mike26

um , even the known "experts" don't have him anywhere near elite status - so why so glum, chum? It almost sounds like you came here with a preconceived notion about what you were going to say if the article was less than glowing.

Now stop making me defend Bedard.

Clink127
Clink127

@OfficerMarcusDuvall You seem to think it's quite a big deal, too, since you used it as an opportunity to post your first comment on this site. You also seem to be quite fascinated with Michael Sam's intimate sexual preferences. He didn't reveal anything more private or personal than the average straight person is free to reveal on a daily basis.

Jeff63
Jeff63

@wlewisiii So if you don't agree with something or it doesn't support your agenda, it's "pretend objective"? Basher indeed ...

Dean9
Dean9

@floorme1955  it apparently wasn't a well kept secret at Missouri.  Speculation is that he came out now to have the attention die down as people got tired of hearing about it and to not look like he was hiding anything from NFL teams.  It would be worse if he denied it to the NFL teams and they found out he was lying.  If he can help a team win he will be an NFL player.  Coaches are on the hotseat all the time and if they see a guy that can help them win they'll take it.   Sure there will be some that pass but the smarter ones will pass because he doesn't have the talent not because he's gay.

Jeff63
Jeff63

@floorme1955"coming out would either provide pressure on the NFL to show the world that it is being progressive- OR has he placed himself in the default position to be the poster child of GAY VICTIMHOOD?"

+1

Mike26
Mike26

@JamesFallen  Many scouts had him at mid-level to start and his teammate ahead of him also.  Why are you so mad at Bedard?

pdw3332
pdw3332

@JamesFallen  ....I don't have a dog in this fight.  I am not a big college football fan, I don't hate gays and I don't think Bedard is necessarily qualified to "scout" a player, since he has never been a scout.  Having said that, blame Peter King for putting Bedard in the position to issue a scouting evaluation.  What is foolish, is how you automatically jump to the conclusion Bedard is tearing Sam down.  Grow up and act as tolerant as you probably think you do.     

ApolloOne
ApolloOne

@rh2000 Probably so that when he is drafted late, and possibly cut, people can point to articles like this and say it wasn't because he was gay. It's because he wasn't that good.


Sam can either meet those expectations, or surprise everyone and exceed them. When you think about it, stories such as these help ensure that Sam can't really lose.

kurzrep
kurzrep

@Rick in Huahin!  Didn't you know that only gay men come on aggressively to other men? Hetero men never come on aggressively towards women or commit aggravated sexual assaults.

DWJ08
DWJ08

@Rick in Huahin!  Sorry, but every player's move is analyzed to the nth degree. That's how it goes when you are thinking of spending a draft pick and a few million on a player.

michaeldeanpinson
michaeldeanpinson

@Rick in Huahin!  Umm. Yes. He does have to get analyzed. If he were to grade out as a 1st-2nd round pick and then isn't drafter until late or at all then we know it is discrimination. If he grades to where he is drafted then we will know that the system has worked. 


kurzrep
kurzrep

@qdog112  Sam did in fact disappear in some big games. When MU needed a stop against SC after being up 21 points...where was he? No big plays. I watched every MU game I could, I'm a Mizzou fan. Sam did overwhelm lesser competition, but he'll need to grow and become quicker for the NFL. He's very coachable and doesn't stop. I believe those traits alone can amount to quite a bit in the right circumstance.

BryanCustard
BryanCustard

@qdog112  Yea he was all-world against Florida, who had a terrible oline, Arkansas State, who is Arkansas State, and Vandy. Against everybody else, he disappears from the competition. POY in any conference is typically a joke, voted on by coaches that are looking at stat sheets because they are not going to pay as close attention as a scout would when voting for those type of things. 

mdworak
mdworak

@qdog112  Do you remember rashaan salaam?  As a Bears fan I sure do.  He won the Heisman Trophy and the Bears picked him and he sucked.  Now what if Sam came out prior to the draft and does not get drafted.  Does he then try to sue the NFL for discrimination saying he didn't get drafted because he is gay?  What if he does get drafted and then gets cut, does he have a case to sue then as well?

michaeldeanpinson
michaeldeanpinson

@qdog112  This is why I love the Tebow reference in his column. One year of stats and production doesn't translate into an NFL career. 

JamesFallen
JamesFallen

@Mike26 I'm not mad at Mr. Bedard.  I am just disappointed that an article such as this is part of the MMQB.  Most of the articles in MMQB are well written and researched by people who know about their subject matter.  This one, not so much.

TonyRestivo
TonyRestivo

@michaeldeanpinson @Rick in Huahin!  


The problem is, potentially, that even if everyone sees the same tape, come to the same conclusions and his stock drops considerably (so that he may not even be drafted), the precipitous drop will be attributed to the fact that he came out as gay before he was drafted and is being discriminated against. Even if he isn't being discriminated against for his sexuality.


Clink127
Clink127

@Kenny2Thorough There is a MASSIVE movement to remove the ban on gay men donating blood, as it's widely considered to be outdated, and based in fears that are no longer statistically or medically relevant. The rate of HIV infections is growing much faster in the hetero community than in the gay community. And even if that weren't true, it still has nothing to do with the point he was making.


The fact that men are statistically more interested in sex (according to one WebMD article) is also irrelevant here. There is no evidence to suggest that gay men cannot comport themselves in a professional setting, nor that they are more likely to act inappropriately or in an over-sexed manner. The number one perpetrator of sex crimes is straight men.

kurzrep
kurzrep

@mdworak @qdog112  He wouldn't be able to sue unless there was evidence that a team specifically didn't take him because he's gay. An email, a phone conversation, a text, a Tweet. He's not flush with cash just to be suing.

GaloofvonDorkmeister
GaloofvonDorkmeister

@mdworak   This is America. Anyone can sue anyone for anything.

I can sue you for having MDWORAK as a name.


Of course, I'll lose. But why would you care if Sam sues the NFL for discrimination?

Clink127
Clink127

@tarheel2 That's true. This is an unusual circumstance - a first, actually - that may or may not warrant this much attention. Straight guys do get articles written about them for all sorts of other mundane, everyday things, like getting married, having kids, getting divorced, having affairs, etc.

Mike26
Mike26

This is no different than most "expert" scouts that you read about. The REAL scouts never give more than a half of a sentence of their reports to the media. EVER. Guys like Bedard are a dime a dozen; however, even the "Experts" like Kiper, McShay and Mayock have him mid-level of the draft or worse. So getting mad that Bedard wrote a "negative" article about him is a waste of a good Valentine's Day.

Clink127
Clink127

@Kenny2Thorough You continue to conflate the issue. AIDS and HIV are not automatically a relevant topic because Michael Sam is gay. You also continue to mistake sexual acts with homosexuality and "being gay." Further, the rate of sexual assault in the military has no bearing on Michael Sam potentially playing in the NFL, and just because men are victims of sexual crimes in the military more than women, that does not mean those crimes aren't perpetrated by straight men. You have continuously posted unrelated sexual articles under the guise of trying to broaden the topic, but in fact your straying wildly from the actual subject.

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