They Complete Us

Football movies may not always get the action right, but the best offer a realistic glimpse into a fascinating world—or let us live out a fantasy. These are The MMQB staff’s favorites. Yours? Let us know in the comments section

Jerry Maguire
Peter King, editor-in-chief

I really liked Jerry Maguire back in the day—back, I guess, almost two decades ago—but for me to name it my favorite football movie ever says a lot about football movies. Basically, football movies have stunk. It has a lot to do with two things: It’s very hard to simulate a real football game up on the big screen. And I’ve covered football for 30 years now, so I can sniff out a fake pretty easily. But there was something about Jerry Maguire that appealed to me. Two things, really. They had the agent thing down pat. Tom Cruise plays a good desperado agent. I was convinced he could act after seeing him desperately mine for phone numbers and contacts after being divorced from his big agency. That desperation, I knew, is what an agent shunned from his group would display. Two: the Rod Tidwell character, played by Cuba Gooding Jr., actually reminded me of Michael Irvin. Street smart, very funny, talented, and hugely concerned with The Next Contract. That’s what so many players try to hide, but it looked real to me. “SHOW ME THE MONEY!!!!” is clearly the best line in football movie history, and Gooding deserved the Oscar he won for Best Supporting Actor. Because he was the best at playing a football player, on and off the field, that I’ve seen. 

Show him the money. (TriStar Pictures/Courtesy Everett Collection)
Show him the you-know-what. (TriStar Pictures/Courtesy Everett Collection)

Jerry Maguire
Jenny Vrentas, staff writer

We live in a cynical world. And we work in a business of tough competitors.  When Jerry Maguire came out in 1996, I was in seventh grade, and I’m quite certain I had no concept of what this statement actually meant. But I loved the movie for being a window into this high-stakes, complicated, adult world I knew nothing about. (Also, that kid was adorable.) It’s remained a favorite through the years, and now working within the world of professional football, I see the pressures and dilemmas Maguire faces in the movie are not only real, but persistent. His crisis of conscience at the outset, after all, is triggered by the son of a player who asks Maguire, “Shouldn’t somebody get him to stop?” after his father suffers a fourth concussion. As an adult, I think what I like the most is not the way the movie winds toward its satisfying conclusion—Maguire and his top (only) client, Rod Tidwell, learning to value some things more than money—but the realistic portrayal of how getting there can be a messy, lonely, ongoing fight. All that, in a movie centering on a sports agent … go figure!

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Remember the Titans
Greg A. Bedard, senior writer

Yeah, I know it’s a bit corny, and a Disneyfied version of the true story, but I can’t help but watch Remember the Titans every time it’s on TV. The performances of Denzel Washington and Will Patton are so good they make you look past the cringe-inducing parts. (“Na Na Hey Hey Goodbye” at a funeral? Really?) I buy into it all each time I watch: the team dealing with the racism around them, the tough coach trying to get his players to believe, the coaches finally putting their egos aside, the Gary-Julius dynamic, and one of my favorite sports movie sequences. (“I don’t want them to gain another yard!”) What resonates most about Remember the Titans is that we’ve all been on teams that have a broad collection of personalities and backgrounds, but you become a band of brothers during that time—and for the rest of your life. That’s not corny. That’s reality.

(Disney Enterprises, Inc/Photofest)
Denzel inspires the Titans. (Disney Enterprises, Inc/Photofest)

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Friday Night Lights
Robert Klemko, staff writer

There’s not enough written about the way longform visual media transformed how we think about football. The work of NFL Films and several motion picture companies over the last several decades breathed life into a previously inaccessible sport, foreign in so many ways to everybody out there who found little romance in its violence. By high school I was no longer a member of the uninitiated, but I can remember a few television shows and movies that enhanced my interest in the game, foremost among them Friday Night Lights, when it came out as a movie in 2004. I was 17 when six of us, varsity members of our suburban Maryland high school football team, squeezed into a Volvo to drive to see the movie. Somebody was freshly 18 and bought a can of long-cut wintergreen Skoal for everybody to try for the first time. Right around the part where Boobie Miles tells his teammates how black and beautiful he is, a couple of us sprinted into the hallway to spit up our dip and the rest of our stomach contents. We collected ourselves and re-entered the universe of Texas high school football and stoic quarterbacks and abusive football dads and morally-compromised head coaches. Their lives became our fantasy; we wondered if we could play football like that, at such a high level, and in front of so many people who cared. We never did, but that mesmerizing score, expertly laid down by Texas instrumental post-rock band Explosions in the Sky, still brings me back to that evening at the theater, and to those days when our biggest concern was the scoreboard at the end of Friday night.

(Ralph Nelson/Universal Studios)
Billy Bob Thornton as the coach, pre-TV. (Ralph Nelson/Universal Studios)

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Little Giants
Andy Benoit, contributing writer

little-giants-posterHollywood can’t make football more entertaining than it already is. The less actual football that’s involved with a football movie, the better the movie. This raises a philosophical question: should a movie like this even be considered a “football movie?” Rudy or Remember the Titans told stories that were about so much more than the sport. Calling them football movies feels a little like calling Titanic a “nautical movie.”

By that standard, a true football movie can only be “good” not “great,” and even getting to “good” is difficult because at this point it becomes in the eye of the beholder. What matters is where you are in life when you see the movie.

I was in second grad when Little Giants came out. I enjoyed that movie almost as much as I’ve enjoyed any movie since. What I liked most were the alternate uniforms. Keep in mind, in October of ’94 the NFL had not fully gotten into allowing teams to wear a third set of pants or jerseys in the same season. Seeing the Giants uniform with a red jersey was awesome. Even more awesome—or to be true to the time, “awesomer”—was seeing the Cowboys uniform with blue pants. Blue pants! And it wasn’t the Cowboys’ boring old plain white jerseys with blue pants; it was their double-star jerseys, which I’m convinced were designed specifically for enrapturing 8-year-olds. Little Giants also had the perfect trick for a children’s football movie: cameos. Spoiler alert: Just when it seems that Rick Moranis (one of Hollywood’s great wimpy actors) and his team of outcasts is at the end of their withered, pathetic rope, John Madden’s bus stops by because the coach-turned-broadcaster-turned-mogul is lost. Even better: Madden just happens to have with him Emmitt Smith, Bruce Smith, Tim Brown and Steve Emtman (now forgotten but at the time two years removed from being the second overall pick in the draft). The arrival of those stars inspires Moranis’s players—and thrilled at least one budding NFL fan. 

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Rudy
Matt Gagne, editor

In what other film does a no-name, no-talent, no-business-being-there excuse for a defensive lineman get serenaded by a slow-clap for showing up late to the final practice of his college career? Then to actually get on the field and play for the Irish? I mean, you’d have to hate the movie if it weren’t based on a true story—and still some people have an aversion to its maudlin overtones. But as a former high school defensive back who made varsity for only one season, I have a soft spot for no-name, no-talent, no-business-being-there little guys who come up big. (Who has two thumbs and earned All-State Honorable Mention as a senior? This guy! So what if it was in New Hampshire?) I met the real-life Rudy Ruettiger when he came to visit my middle school in the mid-1990s, and I was that little annoying kid who wore a Notre Dame jersey to the assembly. Once I got over the fact that the real Rudy looks nothing like Sean Astin, I had my picture taken with him and got his autograph—only one of two I’ve ever asked for in my life. The signed baseball card by Red Sox pitcher Dennis Lamp is rotting in a trash bag somewhere. The index card on which Rudy signed his name is sitting on a bookshelf, framed, in my apartment in the Bronx.

(Photofest)
Editor Gagne’s greatest wish. (Photofest)

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North Dallas Forty
Mark Mravic, editor

Count me as another one who typically finds sports movies tough to swallow. Nothing Hollywood can concoct is as real and visceral as the true-life drama of actual athletic competition. (That’s why the best sports movie you’ll ever see is Hoop Dreams, the brilliant documentary about two Chicago high school basketball players.) The most affecting sports movies are almost always based on true stories: Hoosiers, Raging Bull, Brian’s Song. North Dallas Forty, from former Dallas Cowboys receiver Peter Gent’s semi-autobiographical novel, isn’t as good as those, but it succeeds better than most fictional films in giving us a believable look behind the curtains of an NFL team.

(Paramount)
Nick Nolte is slow getting up as a “North Dallas Bull.” (Paramount)

From the opening scene, in which a battered and disheveled Nick Nolte wakes up on a blood-soaked pillow next to a nightstand strewn with empty beer cans and painkiller bottles, drags his scarred and creaking body to the kitchen to knock back a pill and wash it down with a warm beer, pulls a bloody cotton ball out of his nose with a pair of tweezers, then slides into the bathtub and lights up a joint, you knew this wasn’t Knute Rockne: All American. Nolte’s an aging, jaded receiver trying to hang on, Mac Davis is the Don Meredith-like good ol’ boy quarterback, and the great character actor G.D. Spradlin is letter-perfect as the Tom Landryesque coach, right down to the hat. There’s a venal, smarmy owner; a GM desperate to undermine Nolte (who’s sleeping with his wife); drinking and drugs; fights and foul language; some decent football action; and outrageous ’70s clothes and hairstyles. But what’s best about North Dallas Forty is how it conveys the chasm between the players on the one hand and coaches and management on the other. The movie’s most famous line is delivered by John Matuzsak—poignantly, in that the onetime Raiders wildman would OD on prescription painkillers at age 38—to assistant coach Charles Durning: “Every time I call it a game, you call it a business, and every time I call it a business you call it a game.” More apt may be the scene in which a clueless chaplain asks God to bestow his blessing on “these brave boys as they venture out” for the championship game, and as he concludes, Matuzsak bellows,“Let’s go kill those c———-!” That’s football for you.

What did we forget (besides “Horse Feathers”) ? Tell us your favorite football film, and why, in the comments section below.

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36 comments
VIPOD4ever
VIPOD4ever

 Any Given Sunday always puts me in the mood a week prior to the start of the season. Similar to how "Slap Shot" does the same at the start of hockey season (btw, it's the best sports movie ever! "They brought their f****' TOYS with 'em!" )

Yes, the "one inch" speech is the highlight of AGS, but does any movie capture today's NFL any better? You got old vets, young studs, marketing engine, wacky owner, and drugs!

zaphod42
zaphod42

Gotta throw Number One out there...c'mon, Charlton Heston throwing to Bruce Dern?  Game scenes with actual NFL players (who actually injured Heston in the last game)?  Friday Night Lights was pretty good, especially the football sequences.  Not a lot of them get that right.

PacificNWMark
PacificNWMark

Three that didn't make your list:

1) We Are Marshall - based on a true story, great performance from Matthew McConaughey, and great quote: "What day is it? Game Day. Game Day."

2) Invincible - another based on a true story, Marky Mark walks out of his Philadelphia bar and neighborhood and makes the Eagles roster as a wide receiver.

3) The Replacements - also based (loosely) on a true story (the Washington football team during the 1987 players strike) with Keanu Reeves/Johnny Utah as a washed up college QB and Gene Hackman as the grizzled coach. Too many great quotes to name them all, but among the best: "There is no tomorrow for you. And that makes you very dangerous people."

hmt3design
hmt3design

What, no love for "Semi-Tough?" Or Disney's "Gus?" Or the "Black Sunday" wannabe "Two Minute Warning?"


(Yes, that was a facetious comment.)


Best football movie IMHO: the original "Longest Yard."  

pirate
pirate

What's thematter wiuth you guys? Has everyone forgotten the original "Brian's Song?" No fake football action, actual footage of ale Sayers and Brian Piccolo playing for the Bears in the 60s. Heartbreaking ending. One of three movies (the other two are Field of Dreams and Ol' Yeller) where it's OK for a guy to cry. In fact, with this one it's almost mandatory. "I love Brian Piccolo. And when you get down on your knees tonight, I want you to ask God to love him too."

Oh, and don't forget Horsefeathers. Not your typical football movie. Groucho as Professor Wagstaff with Chico, Harpo and Zeppo overcoming mobsters and helping the school win the big game against Darwin.

AndrewJHamm
AndrewJHamm

I really love "Necessary Roughness."

stevesblackmagic
stevesblackmagic

I cant believe "Brian's Song" hasn't been mentioned more on here, especially by the MMQB writers.  I guess most posters are too young to remember it.  not only great fb movie, but a great lesson in life movie.

bderegt
bderegt

Varsity blues is #1 but the Program deserves honorable mention

Marima
Marima

Jerry McGuire, Remember the Titans, Invincible, The Replacements (cheesy, corny, the whole nine yards of smarmy football goodness), Any Given Sunday - for the "One Inch" speech alone, plus the ending that sticks it to Cameron Diaz), Brian's Song - which made me cry my eyes out as the middle-school girl that I was at the time I watched it.

mklaric
mklaric

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Honorable Mentions:  Last but not necessarily least, here are a crop of films that might not be "about" football, but where it's hard to watch or think of them and not have it come to mind strongly somewhere along the line.

 

 

Forrest Gump - Though it's only got a section that touches upon football, it does so in a way that delights in football and makes you nostalgically appreciate the game and it's earlier players. Run, Forrest, run indeed! Just don't drink so many Doctah Pehppahs when you visit JFK, OK?

 

Radio - Again with the true stories? Oh yes. In certain sense football is less arguable as the focus of the film, especially since it shares time with basketball as the social fabric around which its characters and story are woven. Regardless, it's not the story it is without the importance that the football team has for its local community. And it's a heart-warmer of a story about unshackling ourselves from our prejudices; learning to embrace those who also embrace the things we cherish and who are as much a part of those things as we are.

Point Break - Keanu Reeves somehow nailed our vision of a post-collegiate star quarterback so effectively that his character pops up regularly at the top of lists of fictional football players, even though we never actually see any footage of him playing the game. And no, the session of beach football does not count towards that. Heck, he probably was tacked onto The Replacements in relation to having done this film in the first place.

The Rundown - Not about football? Sure, but those first six or seven minutes unquestionably are! You cannot tell me that there isn't appreciation in it for football when you get to watch the flashbacks covering the impressive skills of the greater portion of a pro team's starters being absolutely kickass. Meanwhile, the Rock begs with the love of a fan not to have to ruin their season by smacking the unholy crap out of the lot of them. Of course he does, though, because he has to and he's a man dammit! The savagery of those football highlights and that fight that follows them have all the adrenaline and football aura that made Any Given Sunday such a thrill ride.

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To cap things up, let's go off track and to the world of television! No this one doesn't count. Duh. Who cares? It's fun and funny and still very, very much about football. Anyone who appreciates the game will find their funny-bone tickled enough to make this a worthwhile one to catch!

The Rocky & Bullwinkle Show - "Wossamotta U" (Season Five) - Our beloved heroes Rocky and Bullwinkle are given scholarships to play for hapless Wossamotta University's football team. Almost overnight the dynamic duo (what is this? Batman?) dramatically turn around the fortunes of the once-beleaguered squad. However, Boris Badenov of course won't just sit by and permit their team to taste success without a challenge, so he puts together a collection of thugs and hoods and monsters to meet up with them in "The Big Game." Hilarity ensues. Or someone gets sued. Something like that.

mklaric
mklaric


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Realistic: Yes, sure, we'll focus somewhat on the "human story" behind the moment. However the real star, the real focus is football. Period. You watch these films for the sense of things "behind the scenes" as anything else. The development of the characters or story is secondary to having the chance to feel like you are a player on the team and fully immersed in what the experience of being involved in professional football can be like.

Any Given Sunday - Who'd have thought that Oliver Stone would decide to do a football film? Who cares? He made it! From shady trainers, old vets, new stars, and hot-head coaches, to fallible owners, you get a sense of the complex dynamics that all come together in putting a professional team onto the field better than any other film has been able to provide. A modern classic.

 

Invincible - Who can't get interested in the true-life story of Dick Vermeil's Eagles and how he gave a shot to unknowns to come on and make the team? Vermeil probably got uncharacteristically choked up and emotional when he saw it, because the Vince Papale story here is football's answer to Rocky! Although one has to admit, "Yo Janet!" just doesn't have the same feel to it.

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Infamous: You want to like these. You sort of like these. One or two might even be guilty pleasures. But you have to admit that these are films that, like some players, just could not make the cut because they had glaring holes in their game!

 

The Last Boy Scout - The late eighties and early nineties weren't always quite sure what their preferred style was, and hence were a bit of a strange fusion while that was figured out. This film is a bit of a strange fusion too. Sadly, it never really figures itself out.

 

The Replacements - Gene Hackman as the coach! Keanu Reeves actually on the field as a quarterback this time! A simple story formula about the misfits who ultimately do fit in. But it's a flabby piece of film-making and everywhere, from performances to how the hackneyed story is handled, the people involved in the film just don't seem to really care.

 

Necessary Roughness - Gah. Kathy Ireland is hot. So let's shove her into the film as a kicker. Oooo-kay... Sinbad's funny. Let's shove him into the film for laughs. He can be the funny big lineman. It will be just like having Matusak in North Dallas Forty. Well... No, not really. It isn't. In the end, it's such a forgettable (though decent) movie. Everyone and everything in it is just OK and nothing more. The one thing you can take away from this film is... is... uh... Kathy Ireland is hot as bejeezus! Did I already mention that?

 

The Longest Yard (Remake) - GAH!! Adam Sandler what have you been doing the last decade or so? Are you trying to sap our very will to live? This film just hurts. It just hurts. It's formulaic in its humor and while it approaches a semblance of respectability, it falls well short of the end zone. You watch it and just say "Ouch" when you watch how this one mangles itself. One line that was changed up from the original (see my quote from it above) expresses that impression pretty succinctly, "I think he just sh*t himself!"

 

Leatherheads - Normally a pretty sharp player in the cinematic world, George Clooney might have bitten off too much in trying to both star in and direct this disappointment. It clearly tries to be a funny period piece that's got a certain artsy atmosphere like the highly successful Oh Brother, Where Art Thou? just set in football's early days instead. And it isn't anywhere near as good. It's got moments. but it's a stillborn film that didn't come out into the world fleshed out well enough to survive. And that's a shame and a half because that era of football is richly deserving of something better to instill a sense of appreciation for its story in modern culture.

mklaric
mklaric


 

Modern:  By this time there's been an explosion of football-related films, all striving to serve our insatiable appetite for any and all things associated with the sport. We'll have to break things down into major sub-categories to help keep things straight.

 

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Comedic: Who says football has to be all blood, sweat and tears? It can be about tears all right; tears of laughter and side-splitting hilarity! Or at least it can make you smirk during some pretty reasonable entertainment.

 

The Best of Times - Robin Williams & Kurt Russell in a hymn to high school glory days that is highly underrated. Kurt is great as the ex-star QB whose glory days are firmly behind him and sorely missed. "When Reno Hightower was a prick he was the best damn quarterback in the history of Kern county." Williams is immensely sympathetic as the everyman who dropped his one shot at even having had a significant moment of glory who will do anything to for one more shot at it.

 

Wildcats - Goldie Hawn shines in the "fish out of water" role of the unexpected coach of an inner-city high school team that's loaded with future stars like Woody Harrelson and Wesley Snipes. Sweet, silly, and just plain fun. Another underrated, endearing comedy! "It’s the sport of kings, better than Diamond Rings! That’s why we’re here to sing... Football!"

 

The Waterboy - Amazingly... decent. Adam Sandler did well enough in it though, that later someone thought that it would be a good idea to have him redo The Longest Yard. Now that was a bad idea. Really bad. But this one is worth the time for some good chuckles. It's overblown characters and silly comedy are so infectious you can't help but smirk and laugh at bit at them in spite of yourself!

 

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Dramatic: Can football tug at your heartstrings as well or break your heart? Teach you about life? Make you realize things that help to make you a better person? Well of course it can! Here are some options that do just that and then some. This is the deepest part of this roster of football cinema and with good cause. Football is inherently dramatic.

 

We Are Marshall - True history. Tragedy. Turmoil. Never giving up on your love of the game and your team, teammates and community. Team building. Even your opponents putting aside rivalries in the interests of human kindness.The re-knitting of a torn and shattered fan base. Triumph. Yeah. This is one that will put the lump in your throat. You could possibly call this football's version of Hoosiers.

 

The Blind Side - Another true story. Another one to choke you up with it's well-crafted, heartfelt moments. This one though can counter-balance that with much more comedy worked into it than other films of this category. It's as much a family film as it is a football film. To be honest, it's a football movie for people that don't know football or like it. That's not easy to pull off. Annnnd Sandra Bullock is still very attractive... uh, I mean... gives us a great performance!

 

All the Right Moves - Small town story of going through tough times. The importance of football to an average kid looking to get out. The weight of football in the community as part of it's source of pride and identity. It's the 80's. It's a steel town boy who struggles but in the end makes good and gets to go after his dream. It's the Flashdance of football movies?

The Express - Football broke the color barrier before baseball didn't it? And with a couple of guys, not just one, although I have to give special props to Marion freakin' Motley! He was a beast! A beast!! Anyhow, that milestone seems to get glossed over quite a lot despite the underlying reality. A well-acted drama focusing upon one of the too-soon over-looked greats of the game, Ernie Davis. A historical time capsule that shows just not how football has grown, but how it's helped us to grow as a society. One classy flick!

Lucas - An unjustly under-appreciated movie. The humanity of the characters in a football movie has possibly never been more poignant. A great love story that stays away from patent, easy endings. Anyone who ever longed to join the team when they were in high school and didn't or couldn't can appreciate the story this film tells. It might well have helped to open the way for Rudy to get made too.

 

mklaric
mklaric



Aw heck. It's hard to pick just one film when you're a fan of the sport. Here's a breakdown of ones to see that weren't on the first list:

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Vintage:  You have to judge these by the times in which they were made. The way you could cover football in film was being created. The very concept of a football movie was being defined.

 

 

Horse Feathers - Yes, Horse Feathers has to be in there. Glad you mentioned it at least! The Marx Brothers. Timeless! Full of slapstick and some of the best absurd one-liners and physical gags any football movie will ever have. Ever.

 

Knute Rockne, All American - The grand-daddy of American football films. Regan as the Gipper. Old football stalwarts making cameos. "Sometime when the team is up against it and the breaks are beating the boys, tell them to go out there with all they've got and win just one for the Gipper." 'Nuff said!

Jim Thorpe – All-American - Another biopic with All-American in the title? Don't let that stop you. It's got Burt Lancaster and more cameos from gridiron legends! Plus, it's about Jim Thorpe, who is not just one of the iconic players of the game but one of the greatest athletes this country has ever had. His like will not be seen again. Well worth your time!

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Classic:  These broke new ground. They defined themselves. And still, football could serve as the source from which these varied and unique films sprung.

 

 

The Longest Yard (Original)- The criminals are the heroes. Can't help but think of the old Oakland Raider teams when you watch this one. A band of social misfits and outcasts come together as one mean, smash-mouth team that's got each others' backs. And they are badasses. Case in point; "I think he broke his fuckin' neck!"

 

Brian's Song - The tear-jerker or tear-jerkers! A moving true story. No sugar coating. You'll cry or at least tear up some if you have a heart. And it reminds you how much "heart" is a quality that's quintessentially wrapped up in the game of football and the bonds that can arise between those that play it.

 

The Fortune Cookie - Lemmon and Matthau! It's only partially to do with football, as football is more the milieu than an integral part of the story, but you can't cover films involving football without giving credit to this dry-witted classic.

 

Black Sunday  - It's The Manchurian Candidate, but centered around football rather than a political election. In a way, it's a film that confirmed that football was unquestionably "here to stay." Our society's passion for the sport having reached such a consistent, steady pitch that it's events were now targets of opportunity for those wishing to somehow strike out against America.

 

Carlos Royo
Carlos Royo

1) North Dallas Forty

2) The Longest Yard (original)

3) Little Giants

4) Friday Night Lights

5) Against All Odds

6) We Are Marshall

7) Blind Side, Titans, Replacements, Jerry McG, Rudy

kirbyreel
kirbyreel

The Jim Thorpe Story starring Burt Lancaster 

BruceBaskin
BruceBaskin

If you're looking for realism, my personal favorite sports movie is one that maybe 12 people in the country have seen is "Sugar," an indy flick about how a Dominican pitcher made his way from one of the various academies down there to a contract with Kansas City and an assignment to a Single A team in Davenport.  Things turn sour when he struggles with not being able to speak English, culture shock in general and then tries a PED after experiencing arm troubles.  Most realistic baseball movie I've ever seen.

Another one that didn't get much of an audience is a comedy called "Mr. Baseball" with Tom Selleck.  It had its shortcomings, but it's depiction of how Japanese baseball works could've come out of a Robert Whiting book.

MarkCalasade
MarkCalasade

Surprised and pleased to see North Dallas Forty make this list.

WellyWorld
WellyWorld

Two of my favorite sports movies are the hilarious "Slap Shot" and of course, the best movie of all time, "Caddyshack."  I can here Rodney now, "Come on, while we're young!"

DickYoungsGhost
DickYoungsGhost

THE FORTUNE COOKIE has it all. Cleveland Municipal Stadium, workers comp fraud, tv sports, Jack Lemmon, Walter Matthau and direction by the legendary Billy Wilder. And with the exclusive CBS slow-motion replay, Keith Jackson!

Brian114
Brian114

It's nice to see that one of the MMQB editors gets it right. ND40 is clearly better than any of the other movies in the list above.

TheQuintessential
TheQuintessential

My best was Any given sunday.. that was a pure football movie without all the fake romanticism! showed how true business of football. 

RcoachV
RcoachV

Windrunner (1995) as a kid I loved how the main character worked and the different training methods he had.

MikeHroncich
MikeHroncich

@GiantBuckeye: My top 5 favorite football movies:

1. The Blind Side

2. Remember the Titans

3. Jerry Maguire

4. Little Giants

5. Necessary Roughness

diofthenati
diofthenati

You're missing an old classic...The Fortune Cookie. Great movie. 

kyates24
kyates24

All the Right Moves completely underrated.

fakeronnburner
fakeronnburner

'Everybody's All-American' (1988) - "A Louisiana football legend struggles to deal with life's complexities after his college career is over." On some level all of us stand out athletes faced this. Unbelievably under rated tale and film.


patcdonaldson
patcdonaldson

love all the movies here but my personal favorite as i played HS football in a small town is varsity blues, so much of that movie hit home....also worth mentioning is the replacements, necessary roughness, and Division III Football's Finest

TominAnnArbor
TominAnnArbor

I have to admit, I'm a sucker for "The Replacements".  I also really enjoyed "We Are Marshall", as I thought that was well-done.  I'm also a fan of "Invincible" and the movie "Wildcats".  

MrMustang65
MrMustang65

The Longest Yard (original) and M*A*S*H (football scene)

TerryinSoCalif
TerryinSoCalif

Invincible was such a great movie. But I liked Jerry Maguire too.

gary7
gary7

@stevesblackmagic  What you expect from these so-called experts who did not know there was a "get back coach" assigned by teams to keep players off the sidelines or to much in co-hoots with the Wash. Post sports writers in telling us were stupid and racist for supporting the name REDSKINS

pirate
pirate

@mklaric Jeez! What a windbag! Take yourself seriously much?

EricKillian
EricKillian

And based on a novel SI's Frank DeFord

DickYoungsGhost
DickYoungsGhost

Mean Machine! Mean Machine! And in M*A*S*H, the Raiders' Ben Davidson.

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