Robert Beck/The MMQB
Robert Beck/The MMQB

When the Game Goes Dark

Jaguars linebacker Russell Allen thought he had his bell rung against the Bills in Week 15 last season. He played through the injury and double vision, but two days later found out he’d suffered a stroke on the field. A dead spot in his brain means he’ll never play football again

By
Robert Klemko
· More from Robert·

From now until the start of training camps, The MMQB will be running a series of our Greatest Hits from the site’s first year. Here, Robert Klemko recounts the harrowing story of Jaguars linebacker Russell Allen’s departure from the NFL.

CARLSBAD, Calif. — Russell Allen will never play football again.

The Jaguars linebacker confronted this reality last Thursday, sitting on the beige sectional in the living room of his home in San Diego’s northern suburbs. It was 9 a.m. in California and noon in Jacksonville, when his agent called with the dreadful news Allen had expected for months: The one-time rookie free agent had been cut after five NFL seasons. The Jaguars announced Allen’s release along with three other cuts, listing the official reason as a failed physical. But this was no ordinary roster move.

Coach Gus Bradley would call Allen to tell him how sorry he was—and that he would always be a Jaguar. General manager David Caldwell also would reach out to express his condolences. As the news sunk in, Allen’s wife, Ali, whispered instructions to their 2-year-old son. Parker did as he was told, running over to his father and telling him he did “a good job playing football.” Allen, 27, burst into tears.

In the back of the brain, the cerebellum tells the body how to walk, run and even crawl. It might also play a role in discerning happiness and fear, but the medical science isn’t exactly sure. What doctors are sure of, however, is that Russell has a spot on his cerebellum, no bigger than a dime, that is dead.

* * *

It went dark on Dec. 15, 2013. Just after halftime in a Week 15 game against the Bills, Allen strafed across the hash marks in pursuit of a ballcarrier before running into center Eric Wood several yards downfield. The two collided face-to-face, dead center from Allen’s perspective, and Allen walked away buzzed as he casually shrugged his shoulders.

“It was strange because it was so routine,” Allen says. “We hit, I got off the block, no big deal. I felt something flash—like they say when you get your bell rung. I didn’t lose consciousness. I walked back to the huddle and finished the drive.”

He showed no immediate signs of being injured. One snap later he sprinted toward the right sideline as running back C.J. Spiller pulled down a swing pass. A half-step too late, Allen exalted cornerback Alan Ball for making the tackle, slapping him on the helmet and shouting, “I see you A.B.!” Two snaps later Allen dropped back in coverage on 3rd-and-seven, only to switch gears as quarterback E.J. Manuel escaped from a crumbling pocket. Allen made a solo tackle in open field, wrapping up Manuel’s ankles after a two-yard gain and forcing a punt on fourth down.

“I felt something flash—like they say when you get your bell rung. I walked back to the huddle and finished the drive.”

At some point in the second half, however, Allen began having double vision on the sideline. He went to fellow linebacker Paul Posluszny for an evaluation. “I remember him telling me to look in his eyes,” Posluszny says. “He kept asking, ‘Is my eye OK?’ I looked at him and said, ‘Yeah, it looks fine.’ I couldn’t tell the seriousness of the situation. How do you tell?”

For Allen, this is the embarrassing part. He went back in and finished the game.

Afterward, he showered with a headache, got dressed with the same headache, drove home with his wife, struggled to watch Sunday Night Football because of light sensitivity, and went to bed with the same headache. If he still had it when he woke up, he told himself, he’d inform the team. The headache persisted on Monday morning, so he told the trainers that he’d been dinged on Sunday and that for a few minutes he’d seen double on the sideline.

Big red flag.

The Jaguars’ medical staff ordered an MRI and sent Allen home after it was done. On Tuesday morning the trainer called Allen and told him to meet the team physician at the emergency room. Allen thought going to the hospital was only a matter of convenience, because the doctor might be doing rounds there. To his surprise he was told that he’d suffered a stroke during the 27-20 loss to Buffalo. Allen was admitted to the hospital and put through a battery of tests for three days while teammates visited and coach Bradley (and several assistants) called to offer encouragement.

Allen’s wife and mother couldn’t believe it. Pregnant with the couple’s second son, Ali knew the risks of professional football and had steeled herself for the day he might be lying on the field motionless, surrounded by doctors. But he’d driven home and told her he was fine. And he was always fine, having never missed a regular-season game in high school, in college at San Diego State or even in the NFL. Above all, Ali wanted to know why. His mother, Jennifer, insisted the diagnosis was made in error.

But the results were conclusive: a small portion of Allen’s brain was inactive. Doctors told Allen it could have been much worse, especially since he went back on the field and risked other jarring collisions. As it was, he had trouble holding onto dishes, breaking several—a symptom consistent with a cerebellum injury.

“If I could go back in time I would do it differently,” Allen says. “Being in it and knowing how I felt in that moment, the game feels so serious. You’re thinking, I can’t come out, because what if someone else comes in and takes my job? Or they need me out there, and I can’t come out because I really want to win. But you can’t do that, and I learned that the hard way.”

Bill Frakes/The MMQB
Undrafted out of San Diego State, Allen (50) caught on with the Jaguars and played in all 64 games over five seasons. (Bill Frakes/SI/The MMQB)

* * *

Losing football would have destroyed Allen in college. He wasn’t allowed to start playing until he turned 14, because his father wanted his interest in the game to peak at the right time. Before then Allen played other sports as if they were football, turning baseball and soccer into contact sports whenever possible. He finally caught the football bug during sophomore year at Vista High in North San Diego County, starting at defensive end for a varsity team that would eventually win a state championship.

Thom Kaumeyer recruited Allen to play linebacker for his hometown San Diego State Aztecs, and Allen arrived on Day 1 able to clean 315 pounds while other freshmen managed about half that load. “Great student, and you couldn’t get him out of the weight room,” Kaumeyer says. “You had to tell him not to burn himself out. He was one of those kids who was really hard on himself.”

Despite amassing 375 career tackles in four seasons, the 6-3, 235-pound Allen went undrafted in 2009. Having played four different positions for a perennial loser, he joined hundreds of other rookie free agents who often go from fringe prospects to the street in a matter of months. Allen had training camp invites from several teams, with two very enticing offers: He could stay on the West Coast and go to camp with the Chargers, or he could chase his dream with the Jaguars, who needed depth at linebacker and had a reputation for turning undrafted nobodies into game-changing contributors. Jacksonville also had the man who recruited him out of high school, Kaumeyer, as their defensive backs coach.

Allen packed his bags and stuck around in the NFL longer than anyone expected. He debuted as a backup and a special teamer, and then became a starter in 2012, leading the Jaguars with 201 combined tackles. With the arrival of yet another coaching staff in 2013, Allen became well-versed at seven positions, from stand-up defensive end to inside linebacker. When he was cut last week, three teams called his agent, Steve Caric, to gauge Allen’s interest. No one outside the Jaguars knew the extent of Allen’s injury—he finished the 2013 season on injured reserve with what was labeled a concussion.

As if coming full circle, Allen’s pro career ended much in the same way that it began.

In 2011, Allen’s third season and Posluszny’s first with Jacksonville, veteran linebacker Clint Session all but collapsed during a game against the Browns. Months later, Session revealed that he had suffered two concussions on the same day. Session trained hard the following offseason and submitted to every medical test, but he couldn’t shake the wooziness and fatigue. It was clear he’d suffered permanent damage, and he eventually retired. Allen spelled Session in that game and subsequently won the starting job.

“Historically, football is full of tough guys, and that’s how is has to be. But there’s a fine line.”

The Session incident had been eye-opening, but not enough for Posluszny to tell Allen last December, “I’m not a doctor. Go ask one.” Then again, with games and livelihoods at stake, you’d be hard-pressed to find any NFL player who is willing to alert the medical staff about a teammate who might be hiding a concussion. “I absolutely have seen guys with serious head injuries,” Allen says. “I’ve seen dozens of those situations, but I would never say something, because they’re grown men and they feel like they need to make those decisions for themselves.”

In the months after Allen’s initial stroke diagnosis, he saw three neurosurgeons. Last week one from UCSD was able to discern how the injury happened. Allen had suffered a carotid artery dissection, a tear in the layers of the artery wall that supplies oxygen to the brain—an injury that occurs in a small percentage of high-speed motor vehicle accidents. (Teddy Bruschi’s stroke in 2005 was caused by a blood clot in his heart, a congenital problem that doctors were able to fix, allowing him to return to the NFL for four more seasons.) None of the doctors Allen consulted could find a precedent for a pro football player suffering this kind of stroke. The last neurosurgeon consulted also dispensed the definitive advice that Allen never play football again.

“Historically, football is full of tough guys,” Allen says. “I have no motive to say it needs to change. For generations football has been tough guys, and that’s how it has to be. But there’s a fine line.”

Robert Beck/The MMQB
Russell says he’s happy to have Parker play sports besides football, at least until high school. (Robert Beck/The MMQB)

* * *

What Allen wants—what he needs—is to make the game better for every man he shared a locker with in Jacksonville, and every NFL player who might shake off a potential a brain injury as a routine part of the game.

“Guys talk about it all the time,” he says. “ ‘I’m all right—I just got my bell rung.’ I’ve had, maybe 10 times in my career, when for a second I felt woozy after a hit. And what I’ve learned from this is that it’s not something to be overlooked. If it feels like something’s wrong, something’s wrong. I want someone to know my experience, so they can know when they experience something similar.”

Russell and Ali are already thinking about Parker, whose toys sprawl across the living room into the kitchen. He has a kid-size soccer set, a plastic basketball hoop, a plush toy football and the real thing—a K-ball salvaged from one of his father’s games. Will Parker play football when he’s older? At least not until high school, Russell says, and no matter what, he’ll know exactly what happened to his dad in December 2013.

“We want to make sure he’s not like, ‘Daddy played football, so I’m going to play football,’ ” Ali says. “We’re so grateful to have the perspective we have now.”

But dissuading Parker from playing will be especially difficult considering Russell’s next step; he hopes to stay in the San Diego area and coach high school football. He wants to help students get their priorities in line sooner than he did. It wasn’t until 2008, when he and Ali became friendly with new neighbors Robert Herber, a pastor, and his wife Stefanie, that football started taking a back seat to faith and family. The couple had moved from Texas to San Diego to start the All Peoples Church, and Herber conducted Russell and Ali’s marriage ceremony in March 2010. “God changed our life through those people. It started to sink in for me what it was all about,” Allen says. “I feel like high school is such an important time for kids to learn what football is about. You play the game because you love it, and you want to honor it. You treat people with respect and do things the right way, and you keep it in perspective, keeping family and faith up front. Those were lessons I learned down the road. I didn’t always have that perspective. I learned my lesson.”

“What I’ve learned from this is that it’s not something to be overlooked. If it feels like something’s wrong, something’s wrong.”

Meanwhile in Jacksonville, Posluszny arrived for voluntary offseason workouts on Monday morning, finding Allen’s locker cleared out and ready for the next nobody to make a name for himself, however brief his time in the spotlight. The future is uncertain for Allen, who will be on blood-thinning medication for the rest of his life. He still exhibits coordination problems, struggling to pick up and grip handheld objects, though doctors say these difficulties should subside over time. What they don’t know is how a man with a dead spot in his brain will react to another concussion, even if it occurs away from the field.

For now, Allen simply plans to buy an NFL Sunday television package to catch Jags games next season. But how can he watch a game, he wonders, without analyzing every snap as if he’s still in film sessions? He finds comfort in the support of his now-former teammates, and in the Jaguars’ organization. In his months of worry, the NFL had proven itself the opposite of the cutthroat business he’d heard about and occasionally seen first-hand. The messages from coach Gus Bradley and GM David Caldwell were especially uplifting.

“It gave me closure,” Allen says. “Gus said I’d always be a part of this, no matter what. Dave said I could come back to Jacksonville whenever I wanted. Now I think I can watch again.”

mmqb-end-slug-square

More from The MMQB
68 comments
JPM88
JPM88

I noticed this story because a similar type of stroke happened to my 45 year old wife.  The top causes for a carotid dissection  (we were told by three different neurologists)  1) Poor Chiropractic care.  2) Car accidents 3) Blunt-force trauma to head or neck 4) Spontaneous (unknown).  My wife fell under the fourth category. She was healthy, no family history and none of the first three causes.


She was out of work for almost a 10 months and  yet has made remarkable progress. She works part-time now and hoping to regain her full-time abilities later in the year.  Approximately a year later, she is still dealing with strength issues on right hand and fatigue is an issue, but she regained strength, balance and cognitive abilities.  She is also on a blood thinner - though her doctor may let her off if the dissection has completely healed. 


One thing that was not reported is that stroke patients that receive RTPA medicine within the first three hours of having a stroke are more likely to benefit than those that do not.  A carotid dissection (tear in the inner lining of the carotid artery) tries to heal itself - thus clotting.  When a piece of the clot breaks off, it will travel up into the brain where it lodges and restricts blood flow causing damage and possibly a stroke.  If it is within the 3 hour window and their are no complicating factors, doctors can administer RTPA which dissolves the clot.  The sooner this is done, the less damage that will result.  Timing is crucial due to severe complications that can occur outside the 3 hour timeframe.  I firmly believe that my wife's strong recovery was due to the quick treatment she received and the fact that she was given this medicine.


From my limited view Mr. Allen and his family are doing the right things.  Therapy helps.  Positive attitude is crucial.  And patience with Mr. Allen is required.  I found that in my situation, many people that we have interacted with don't understand the time it takes to recover from a stroke.  Just because Mr. Allen may look fine on the outside, his brain and body may take a long-time to recover.  As a spouse of a stroke victim, I can say that I was fooled sometimes by her outward actions and that I needed much more patience.  The good news is that recovery is very likely in a young person given the right treatment and support.

The_Wolf
The_Wolf

Best wishes to Mr. Allen and his beautiful young family in the future.  Take comfort knowing you've surrounded yourself with people that love you and care about you.  Good on you for understanding there is more to life than football, as much as well all may enjoy it.

Raiderforlife
Raiderforlife

Did you hear how many people where shot and killed in Chicago they have the stricktest hand gun laws of anybody controlled by democrats

number18
number18

God be with this family and every other nfl family who has a member on the field.We cheer our teams,but forget the price that some pay.

KyrstenGustafsonMiller
KyrstenGustafsonMiller

So glad it was caught early, so he has the rest of his life to be with his wife and kids. He will be so missed in Jacksonville and on the field. Best of luck. 


Aussie TEK
Aussie TEK

Thank God doctors caught it before some worse happen.  So he can now spend time with wife and sons.

superbombastik
superbombastik

Dudes very lucky. Still has his overall health. This might have saved him from much worse after 15 to 20 years of banging into guys. Nothing for him to be embarrassed about. Coming out of the game wouldn't likely have changed the outcome. He has the honor of knowing he finished the game he started. Move on, there'll be some great opportunities out there for coaching kids. You'd think the team management would have some bones to throw at a guy like this within the organization? Be well, enjoy your beautiful wife and the memories.

Mark20
Mark20

So, he's fairly wealthy, still has his mental and physical capabilities, still has a lovely young wife (the one in the picture leaning on him like he's about to die, how dramatic!) and a family. Sorry, boo hoo, glad he's better, but there are a lot of folks out there not as lucky as him: NFL healthcare, money etc. This self pity amongst the well to do, is a bit much.

karissawyld
karissawyld

Perhaps this young man can turn this around to educate other athletes, especially the younger up and coming that yes, it CAN happen to them.  They need to be hyper aware of what their body is attempting to tell them to discern between normal sore/ouch and something WRONG.  

tcz7163
tcz7163

WHAT ABOUT ALL THE NORMAL PEOPLE THAT HAVE THIS KIND OFF STUFF HAPPEN TO THEM.

YOU DONT SEE THEM ON HERE OR ON THE NEWS

BFD

SFCRET
SFCRET

If he thought he had his bell rung he should have told staff.  They would have evaluated him for concussion and kept him off the field.  He was lucky he survived his bad decision.  This story shows that players share fault for head injury affects.  It is not always noticeable when someone has "THEIR BELL RUNG"

tmgrtl
tmgrtl

Got a lot of love for this guy. He played hard for the Jags every season, and seems like a great person off the field. He's still blessed to have his faith, family and friends. Always a Jaguar.

benbona75@gmail.com
benbona75@gmail.com

Athletes are a part of our society.  Everyone in our society deserves your attention and your concern.  Many others suffer from strokes and much worse but are soon passed over and forgotten especially if they are not great athletes.

       BCB, MD

tex2cfla
tex2cfla

Great guy ! Will miss him in Jacksonville. Russell and Poz. where a tough L.B.ing combo. One important issue was it sounds like the Jagures treated him with the respect that he earned during his career. I know he was one of may favorite players and well respected in the community. Most encouraging though is it sounds like he found the Lord during this process. God Bless you and your family !  

jbs50221
jbs50221

This wasn't a football injury...the diagnosis left him ham stringed for any future compensation. Because he acquired that dead spot before he actually took that lick to make him woozy. But that goes to show you also that football physicals do not detect every issue. That might even cause you to die. If a player was given an MRI as part of his physical, these things could be found earlier. But at least he can now be a full time dad to both his children. And through his faith in God he will be able to teach a solid structure to his children and any of those who grace His high school coaching efforts. 

WilliamSmith4
WilliamSmith4

I had a stroke last year, it's no joke. It happened one night while I was asleep, and when I awoke I had lost all control and feeling in the left side of my body. It took me MONTHS before I was able to start getting back to a normal routine. I now walk with a limp, and have only basic use of my left hand/arm. The left side of my face feels swollen, and I suffer from constant pain and distress. I have serious trouble going to sleep. This is my life now.


Russell should feel lucky, it could have been a LOT worse. I know. :(

msskt
msskt

One of the important part of the story is how the team doctors reacted It was not a case of your ok, get back out on the field, it was professional and to their credit.

Haddock
Haddock

Thank goodness he is ok. Sounds like a tough guy. I think we have to wonder about a system that makes ignoring a stroke seem important.

Shwump
Shwump

Good for him. He is alive and can live a normal life and be happy. Sure beats dying on the field. Time to get a real job. Best of luck.

gm5425
gm5425

Players in MLB and the NBA have guaranteed contracts...but not the NFL.  Makes no sense.

BrianSinclair
BrianSinclair

He is a great man. He should be idolized. He should be sent money by everyone. God bless him.

C Newton
C Newton

Had a TIA transient ischemic stroke about six years ago, went to the hospital and spent memorial day weekend there getting tests so this article is very important, I certainly hope Russell is doing well and he and his family continue to improve:) 

glenn18
glenn18

As a footnote my mris and brain scans came back clean.I have no answers at this  juncture.

glenn18
glenn18

I have suffered two mini strokes in the past two years and realize the fear that Russell must have,Mine was more comparable to Coach Kubiaks stroke last season.Russell you are in my thoughts because both of us are members of this fraternity.

JoshPerkins1
JoshPerkins1

This is where its hard for me and others to side with non-guaranteed contracts. Players need lifetime medical coverage IMO, glad to hear in the end he didn't suffer more.

Tommy K
Tommy K

As an SD native, SDSU grad, and football fan, wish Russell the best in his life. Sad story but glad he can walk and talk and carry on his life. 

Tbone1310
Tbone1310

Trash day in the NFL.


Worst union in the most dangerous sport.  They need guaranteed contracts and lifetime health insurance as the "Senator's son" continues to run the league and make billions.

Phuk_Yu
Phuk_Yu

@Raiderforlife  How about those 3,000 innocent Americans murdered in the 9/11 Attacks...in a country with a REPUBLIKKKAN President??

Meanwhile, his Democrat sucessor caught the man who helped mastermind this horrific slaughter.

BY
BY

@Mark20  Mark you must be a blast at parties with that 1/2 full attitude.....

number18
number18

@Mark20 He Made his "Luck" mark20,unlike a huge number of deadbeats who cry" po me".

NYC Tim
NYC Tim

@Mark20  Fairly wealthy? What are you basing that ignorant statement on? An undrafted free agent gets the league minimum. He didn't get to renegotiate when he became a starter. He's going to have to work for a living at some point. You want to trade a few years of salary for a brain injury? If you do, you probably already have a brain injury. 

Phuk_Yu
Phuk_Yu

@tcz7163  We don't care about normal people...because they aren't athletes.

ByronHenderson
ByronHenderson

@tcz7163  This is a sports column. Calling attention to the injury and how it was confronted does not belittle anyone else who suffers it. Non-athletes that suffer from this, as well as other injuries, do sometimes have stories written about them and their struggles. SI focuses on sports figures and their stories; you're on the wrong forum if you don't want to focus on those. 

tony c
tony c

@SFCRET  

You just don't "GET IT", do you ? Football "IS" about being TOUGH !!!!

I won't argue your point, but it's like telling kids to not eat too much candy. It feels good and you can't stop. Getting banged up is just part of the game and you wear it like a badge of honor. No i'm not talking about broken ankles or torn ACL's. It's the big collisions, that flash he describes.  I've seen it many times.  I've had 4 concussions, maybe a few more.  I'm OK. My memory suffers a little bit but I'm OK. I'll never forget the glory of it all, nor the disappointments when you lose. But I'm OK. This was a freak deal, 1 in a million. At least he got 5 years in to qualify for his NFL pension.

tcz7163
tcz7163

I AGREE BUT DONT CALL HIM OR ANY OF THEM GREAT. IT JUST SWELLS THERE HEADS AND CHECKBOOKS

tony c
tony c

@jbs50221  

I disagree, it was a football injury.  How did the wall of the carotid artery in his neck tear ?  Playing soccer with his son ???   It was the result of a collision, and most likely on the field.

AfternoonNapper
AfternoonNapper

@WilliamSmith4  Don't give up or give in — a year out may seem like a long time, but there's still so much recovery possible. I'm five years out from my stroke as of April. Yes, it's impacts are still a factor in my day-to-day life, but I never quit, and never plan to quit, pushing forward. 

BillRobinson
BillRobinson

@tcz7163

A real spokesperson for compassion in all caps. Plus you missed the whole point of the article. You're safe with your anonymous posting though.

Haddock
Haddock

@tcz7163  I didn't see where the article said how much he had earned. Must be nice to live in a world where other people who try hard and get hurt don't matter.

YemiThaBassMan
YemiThaBassMan

@tcz7163  Given that he was an undrafted free agent, it's very likely that the contract he received wasn't large enough to make him independently wealthy. 

That money doesn't go as far in San Diego, as it would other places. 

Chances are, he will have to "work a real job". 

donald5
donald5

@gm5425  It's all semantics.  If the players union in the NFL demanded guaranteed contracts they could.  However they would be a bit shorter than the lengths they are now and there would be more performance bonuses.  You can basically look at the NFL contracts right now and figure how long their contract is guaranteed for.  A lot of agents set up contracts so it is too financially painful for the team to get rid of a player in the first 2 or 3 years.  Those years are for all intents and purposes, guaranteed. 

drudown
drudown

@Tbone1310  


To add insult to our Nation's injury, the Congress REFUSES to COLLECT INCOME TAX from the NFL and the MOST PROFITABLE CORPORATIONS IN THE UNITED STATES. What a joke. 


Our "elected leaders" are trash for taking BRIBES instead of honoring oaths. 


NFL players? They know the risks and are paid way, way too much money to "cry foul" for the known occupational hazards. Taken to its illogical conclusion, any OTHER person in society that chooses to play football "assumes the risk of injury" and is barred from recovery…but the NFL players get up to $24,000,000 a year and can then sue? That is arguably as inequitable as the aforementioned EPC violation of the Tax Laws.


Oh, wait. The latter affects National Security and our General Welfare. Never mind.  

Aussie TEK
Aussie TEK

@NYC Tim @Mark20  Mark you have the brain injury.  Even minimum salary is good.  Yes he will have to work more but at least safer job.


number18
number18

@tcz7163 you really should spend more time in Remedial english {"there does not = their} and less time online showing your Stupidity.

ByronHenderson
ByronHenderson

@tcz7163  He's "great" is the manner he has addressed the issue and wants to address it for both himself and others going forward. Nothing in that "swells there (t-h-e-i-r, by the way) heads and checkbooks". Also, turn off your caps lock. 

tcz7163
tcz7163

Well he played for five years .

Year one 325 thou

Year two 575 thou

Year three 1.5 mill

If that is not enough money that is his own fault. And i know how much it cost to live in san diego my wife is from there and we are thinking about moving back

I have no pitty for football players they know the risk

patriot1burke
patriot1burke

@drudown @Tbone1310 

IMO, corporations shouldn't have to pay corporate taxes.  USA competes with other countries for jobs.  The less taxes the pay the better.  Instead do across the board income tax increases, especially on the ultra wealthy.

Kdiff7
Kdiff7

@drudown @Tbone1310 Those coporations SHOULD pay taxes since "they are people too, my friend"  thanks to those idiots on the Supreme Court. Maybe Texas should execute these corporations for NOT paying taxes!

bryon999
bryon999

@drudown @Tbone1310  Do you have any evidence to back up your claims that Congress refuses to collect income tax from the more profitable corporations?  I am calling your BS.  You are just talking out your rear end.

EdwardKirby
EdwardKirby

@bryon999 @drudown@Tbone1310

"Do you have any evidence to back up your claims that Congress refuses to collect income tax from the more profitable corporations?  I am calling your BS.  You are just talking out your rear end."

Read it and weep:

http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/business/2013/10/23/big-companies-pay-no-taxes/2480281/

From the link:

"A surprising number of companies in the Standard & Poor's 500, 57, have found ways to pay effective tax rates of zero, according to a USA TODAY analysis of data from S&P Capital IQ.


The news comes months after after the Government Accountability Office released a report showing that companies in 2010 reported an average effective tax rate of 12.6%, well below the 35% federal corporate tax rate."

Frankly, I'm surprised by your comment. I thought *everyone* knew this by now.

Newsletter