The Tuesday Mailbag

Questions on hot topics including Josh Freeman's fall from grace, long working hours for coaches, an NFL double standard and the varied uses of service dogs

ABOUT JOSH FREEMAN.Something seems to be missing here. Is it all about work ethic? Does Freeman really have such a bad reputation that no other team will take a chance on him, and if so, why did the Giants sign him at all when they just drafted a promising QB, Ryan Nassib, last year? I think it’s an interesting contrast to Mark Sanchez, who seems to be slipping right into the backup role in Philly, despite several poor years and never having really proven himself, at least no more than Freeman in my opinion. Besides work ethic, is some of this due to the very different ways these two have reacted to adversity, Sanchez showing nothing but complete class, and Freeman maybe a little less so?

—Baruch, Beit Shemesh, Israel

I don’t think it really has much to do with class. I think it has much more to do with work ethic and performance. There is no way that the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, with a relatively new coach and in desperate need of a long-term quarterback, are going to give up on a young player less than a year removed from throwing for more than 4,000 yards unless they have serious concerns about his long-term performance. Now, in the span of eight months, three teams have given up on Freeman. You’re right. It is a very interesting story and there’s no question right now that Freeman is at the crossroads of even having a career.
 

TALK BACK

Have a question for Peter King? Send it along to talkback@themmqb.com and it might be included in next Tuesday’s mailbag. Be sure to include your name and hometown.

ABOUT SERVICE DOGS. I would greatly appreciate it if you would pass this along to Mr. Law based on his commentary regading the not-so-creatively named “poopgate.”  While he may believe that dog was “serving no purpose” and the owner was ‘”walking fine,'” he (and you) may want to consider that appearances are not necessarily what they seem.  Not all service dogs are there to assist with physical ailments, and while I didn’t see the woman and can’t attest to her condition, an assumption that because she appeared to be mobile therefore doesn’t require a service dog is an extremely flawed one and frankly disappointing coming from someone working in a production job on a network that claims to break news.  For instance, there are many organizations (a list can be found here) that provide service dogs to military veterans who may outwardly appear to be “fine” as Mr. Law may attest, but in reality suffer from PTSD and that service dog is a vital aid in helping them cope. My guess: The laugh track that Mr. Law seems to have been running in his head may not have been so funny to the woman experiencing it. It sounds as if she was extremely apologetic to the point of offering to purchase a gift card for affected passengers out of her own pocket, and your complete lack of empathy for the sake of comedy in running that “piece” was disappointing.  I have come to expect better from you than to entertain “poop” jokes.  
 
—Jason, Weston, Fla.
 
Many people posted similar opinions today on this topic—both in emails and on Twitter. I understand the frustration of those who would say that Chris Law doesn’t understand the wide variety of reasons why service dogs may be necessary. All he was doing was making an observation that the woman seemed fine and having no need for a service dog. Now he understands, and my readers do too, that service dogs can also be used by people who appear perfectly fine, but have some sort of hidden malady that makes a service dog a necessity.
 
WHY DO COACHES WORK OVERTIME? A friend and I were just talking about coaches and the crazy hours they keep. I was hoping you could give some insight on that. What do these guys do for 14-16 (or more!) hours a day? Isn’t there only so much film you can watch before your brain just turns to fudge? Bud Grant had a lot of success back in the 60’s and 70’s and I’ve read that he was  home by 5 or 6 every night. Position coaches working 14-hour days? I honestly don’t get that. Not saying they need to be 9-5 but again, there’s only so much that needs to be done in a day. It’s no wonder these guys face burnout after a while.
 
—Chuck Lawson
 
This is an interesting question and topic. I believe coaches have gotten caught up in an arms race. If San Diego coach Mike McCoy knows that Andy Reid in Kansas City is sleeping on the couch in his office and pulling all-nighters twice a week, he’s going to be more inclined to burn the midnight oil in the office. Football is such a complicated game to figure out sometimes that most people (I believe) are interested in making sure that they look at every last possibility that could come up in a game no matter how long it takes them. In Bud Grant’s day, two generations ago, coaches were home for dinner. But I don’t think there was an arms race then among coaches as there is now.
 
BLAMING WASHINGTON. There has been a ton of commentary on whether the NFL should be suspending players for marijuana. Do people not get that the issue here is not about marijuana? It is about a rule set by the NFL, and agreed to by the NFLPA, and the player choosing to repeatedly ignore it. I’m a Cardinals fan and I blame no one but Daryl Washington for his suspension; for being immature and selfish and not realizing he is part of something bigger than himself. Players like Washington and free agency are the reasons I do not have a favorite player; I am a Cardinals fan and that’s where my loyalty lies. Obviously, Washington’s loyalties are to the $2.5 million joint he smoked.
 
—Shane, Warner-Robins, Ga.
 
Well said. What is mind-boggling to me is that Washington signed a contract that called for him to get a $10 million bonus this year and he was either too addicted or too stupid to follow the tenets of the NFL’s drug program. I just simply can’t believe that a guy would put that much money at risk unless he has such severe demons at play and is such an addict that he cannot stop.
 

Mike Priefer was accused of making homophobic comments while working as a Vikings assistant coach. (Harry Engels/Getty Images)
Mike Priefer was accused of making homophobic comments while working as a Vikings assistant coach. (Harry Engels/Getty Images)

THE NFL’S DOUBLE STANDARD. I love your work and enjoyed reading your article on the NFL locker room challenge and had a question about it.  There is an ongoing investigation with the Minnesota Vikings regarding Mike Priefer’s comments about gay people.  This investigation has taken over 150 days and counting while the Jonathan Martin investigation was wrapped up in 100 days during a season.  While the investigation is ongoing Mike Priefer has been retained as a coach during the formation of Mike Zimmer’s staff, participated in preparing the team for a draft where the Vikings passed on the first openly gay player, and is now instructing players during OTAs. Richie Incognito was suspended from the team during the investigation and was not allowed contact while the investigation went on.  How can we take the NFL’s emphasis on proper locker room behavior in regards to gay people seriously when the Priefer investigation seems to be given a lower standard of treatment then the Incognito investigation.  This sure seems like a double standard. 
 
—Jesse H., Apple Valley, Minn.
 
You think it has been given a back seat in terms of urgency and relevance by the NFL. But you don’t know. Neither do I. I was in Minnesota in late March, and I was told the investigation is still ongoing. By the way your question was termed, you seem to think that it is a certainty that Chris Kluwe’s charges against Priefer are true. They may well be. But until the end of the investigation, I’ll choose to keep an open mind about who is telling the truth in this case. Now, I’ve had good interaction with Kluwe and I believe he is an extremely intelligent person and a good punter. But I think it’s only fair in this case that we let the investigation play out. If it turns out that Priefer is the guilty party here, then your questions are going to have significant validity. But again, I’m going to wait before I indict.
 
WARHAWK PRIDE. I encourage you to consider a shout-out to the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater for accomplishing a feat that no other team has achieved in NCAA history (as I understand it).  UW-Whitewater just won the NCAA Division III College World Series, which gives them NCAA championships (Division III) in football, basketball and baseball all in the same school year.
 
—Arthur
 
Wow. I was totally unaware. And you’re right. Hats off to the Warhawks. That is a tremendous achievement.
 
ORTIZ INSENSITIVITY. I think it is more than a little ironic that in a column about changing locker room culture and making players more respectful and accountable for their behavior toward others you skim over Ortiz’s childish and sexist comment regarding David Price. It’s of the same order as Incognito, if not of the same magnitude. Why not just say Price is cheap, or reckless, or a very poor sportsman? You get my point. Other than that, I love your work, it’s a highlight of Mondays, and sincere congratulations on your 25 years.
 
—Anthony
 
Thank you, I appreciate that. I heard from a lot of people today saying that I should not have given Ortiz a pass for what he said. With all due respect, it is ludicrous to compare the continued hazing of another human being on your team, doing things like telling that human being that you want to arrange group sex with his sister against her will, with a comment from David Ortiz that called David Price a little girl. I understand that I may have been a bit insensitive about the “little girl” and “little b—-” comment by Ortiz. Thinking about it now, I probably just wouldn’t have used it. But the treatment of Martin and the comments by Ortiz are not comparable.
 
SONS AND FATHERS. I’m a sports broadcaster out here in San Francisco for 95.7 The Game. I was reading your piece & was suddenly overcome with emotion. You expressed your regret that your father never saw your accomplishments. I always knew I would be successful in this business. While my father was an enthusiast of following your dreams, he was very big on hard work and had his doubts. He believed in me though and I was always looking forward to the day I would validate that belief. He passed tragically exactly 800 days before my first time on-air and it kills me everyday. Just wanted to say that you’re not alone and while your piece brought me to tears I’m thankful for the emotional outlet. 

—Zakariah
 
That’s really nice of you. I appreciate it. I go weeks without thinking of that, and then, when I think about it, suddenly I get emotional too. It’s probably the biggest sadness in my life, how early my father and my two brothers were taken from the Earth. We all have sadness that we must deal with, and that to me is as tough as it gets. Thanks a lot for your empathy.  

mmqb-end-slug-square

More from The MMQB
87 comments
pk_sea
pk_sea

I'm sure the woman and her prized poodle had PTSD. Come on, these dog on the plane people are hurting real ADA cases. 

/Now back to sports

TiredOfCliches
TiredOfCliches

Love how readers got after Peter about posting the dog poop story and the woman who "appeared fine" and perhaps didn't need a service dog....


Do I share their outrage?  Not one bit.  But Peter K brought this on himself with all his babbling about the political incorrectness of the Redskins team name, etc.


Can't have your cake and eat it, too, Peter...not in the world that people like you have--if not helped to create--at least given fresh legs on a regular basis with ceaseless politically correct drivel.


I'm not saying that people who are against the Washington Team name are out of line, just that maybe it, and other subjects like it, need not be discussed over and over and over again in columns like this one.  We get it...some people don't like the name...time to move on and talk about football.

rskins09
rskins09

To me Josh Freeman was too much $ too fast  and he couldn't handle it ... The coaching staff lost all confidence in him  and he probably lost the locker room as well ..Feel  he had/ has more upside than Sanchez  who was a typical overvalued,  overhyped USC  QB .. A flash in the pan .. You can stick a fork in Sanchez .. 

LukasDimisio
LukasDimisio

I agree, service dogs are a joke.  Did anyone see Game of Thrones on Sunday night?!!!  That was epic!!!  :-)

Eric Nielsen
Eric Nielsen

There's a lot of people with phony service dogs (my mother-in-law for instance).  All you need is a silly vest and a laminated card, both of which are readily available on the internet.  There's no central registry for tracking such things.

liquidmuse3
liquidmuse3

Shows how much Peter King continually doesn't know about marijuana that he mentioned it & "addiction" twice in the same paragraph. But King can run a "beer of the week" feature in an NFL column & people don't bat an eye, even thought alcohol is WAY more dangerous, deadly, & yes, addictive than marijuana. Ask your friend Mr. Kluwe about it some time, he seems to be progressive enough to enlighten you.

CobyPreimesberger
CobyPreimesberger

well i take everything i just said in my previous post about marino back, as it looks like wires got crossed and he was never supposed to be attached to the lawsuit and his lawyers are looking into how he was attached to the lawsuit, as to me again it didn't make sense at all, as marino has been one of the few post football that has had a successful career and other then needing money why he would do this

CobyPreimesberger
CobyPreimesberger

again this is classless and i thought marino had more class than this.  look the only major injury we do know that marino suffered was torn knee ligaments, and he was manning, before manning, as in a 5 year period between 1984-1989, marino had the least ammount of hits because of his quick release

westcoastbias
westcoastbias

Peter,

After 25 years of insight, I can't believe you missed this.  It's obvious that the investigation into Mike Priefer’s comments doesn't have the same standard of urgency as Incognito's - it's taken 5+ months, compared to 3+.  I agree we should wait to judge, but how can something this straightforward take that long to wrap up?  In fact, it gets harder to pin down the facts the longer it takes. In addition, there is an evident double standard because Incognito was suspended while the investigation went forward.  Shouldn't both men have had the "innocent until proven guilty" standard applied?  We can't speak to the merits of the complaint against Priefer, but we can see the lack of priority it has been given.


You're good, but not perfect.  

teamusa2014
teamusa2014

Is the majority actually anti-NFL on the concussion issue? Hard to tell but I've seen alot of posts on multiple sports websites which seems to indicate the players knew what they were doing, got paid exorbitantly for their roles and are now crying after the game has left them...I can see both sides of it.

Rickapolis
Rickapolis

The big problem with the concussion issue, I think, is that the teams routinely sent players back on the field knowing they had been concussed. Just last season I heard an announcer (Chris Collingsworth, I think), talking about a guy 'shaking off the cobwebs'. And that, frankly, is a vey ignorant way to look at such an injury. The players were trained from an early age to play as long as they were conscious.  They were shamed into not getting back into the game. And that is what gives them a chance in these suits.I'm sure that players were somewhat aware of the dangers, but peer pressure, from teammates and the coaching staff, caused them to return against their better judgement. I see massive payouts coming. 

ohiojim44
ohiojim44

I do have a big problem with the NFL's draconian and unfair penalties on marijuana versus their relatively lenient punishment for  much more egregious actions like DUIs, domestic abuse, assault and battery, drunk and disorderly. In what reational world does a player get suspended - and lose pay - for 6, or 8, or 16 games for a completely benign and non-violent act (smoking weed), when drunk drivers, wife batterers, public drunks, etc. get suspended for a game or two? It's outrageous and hypocritical. 

ohiojim44
ohiojim44

I agree completely that the boneheads who repeatedly risk big money to smoke weed are solely to blame for their predicaments. But please, Peter,  stop promulgating stereotypes and misinformation about marijuana. The fact is that marijuana is NOT an addictive drug. Literally millions of people who smoked weed in college, or in their youth, just stopped doing it as they got older. Just stopped on a dime. It happens every day. I suppose it's possible for anything (eg.-food) to be PSYCHOLOGICALLY addictive for weak minded people, but it's a proven scientific fact that marijuana is not an physically addictive substance.

lumpy701
lumpy701

Is there no statute of limitations on these types of suits?  Did the information on concussions not come out more than two or three years ago?  There is no way that Dan Marino or any of these players would have done anything differently if they had been given a written outline of the long term risks of playing football.  They sure knew they were taking needles and risking permanent injury by doing so, but went ahead anyway. This is simply a money grab by mercenary lawyers and players who did not manage their money well.


Buck2185
Buck2185

Peter, it is not surprising that you went negative on Dan Marino. 1- he played on a team that is in the same division as your Patriots and 2) Marino could throw the ball downfield with accuracy (something your little Tommy whishes he could do). Lastly, as per your norm, you went off on this topic with very little facts known at this point. So commences the next 25 years of PK writing....

blynder
blynder

@Eric Nielsen

How do we know and how do you quantify "a lot of people with phony service dogs"?

el80ne
el80ne

@liquidmuse3 I don't see your point. Although marijuana is not physically addictive it can be psychologically addictive, just as many enjoyable things can be. An addiction to food and overeating can lead to obesity. An addiction to sex can lead to undesirable but compulsive sexual behavior and activity. Obviously there's something seriously wrong with Washington to risk a 10 million roster bonus coming up just to get baked. He could just be an idiot. But he could have crossed the rubicon into a psychological dependency on pot. PK didn't need to qualify his statement by calling it a psychological dependency for me to understand what he meant.

Wombat
Wombat

@liquidmuse3 Liquid my friend, the problem can be explained thus, (and I paraphrase the great Danny Glover in the great and meaningful movie of 1987 - Lethal Weapon), at this point in time alcohol is legal, pot isn't, (in most states AND according to the NFLPA agreement anyway). Peter can hardly be faulted for stating the facts...

Mike26
Mike26

@liquidmuse3 Ah, yes, pot:  the never-hurt-nobody-nohow-notime-EVER drug that nobody gets addicted to.....

Mike26
Mike26

@CobyPreimesberger Oh Coby, I had high hopes for you!  I really thought you were improving in your last post when you used REAL punctuation (a little bit, anyway).  Now you've regressed to your multiple lines punctuation- and structure-free "sentences".

Wombat
Wombat

@CobyPreimesberger Hmm, how many are now suspicious that Dan got cold feet when he saw that his Miami job was in jeopardy and is now back pedaling like crazy?

Mike26
Mike26

@westcoastbias Incognito's a player; player conduct is almost always handled more quickly because there's fewer layers to go through.  The Priefer accusations may be true or not; however, they were reported by ONE man = a man that no longer is good enough to play in the NFL.  If he truly wanted to make a difference, he would have spoke up while still playing under him.  He's hardly a strong witness to this situation.

usameos6
usameos6

@teamusa2014 I agree - I would say that it's probably 90% of comments that favor the NFL.  It's nice to actually have some reasonable and fact based discussions here, though.  


I think the players have some responsibility as when you look at the timelines - there are several times where the information available in the public domain is significantly different than what was provided by the NFL and they should bear some responsibility for protecting themselves and their own interests. 


However - the way the NFL acted to cover up this information and funded studies (that were severely critiqued by neurologists) to provide a counter argument to this is pretty bad as well.  The time period from 1994 - 2004 is particularly bad with the NFL's MTBI program being run by a rheumatologist that falsified some of his credentials and consistently acted to put out misinformation and faulty studies.  


“On concussions, I think is one of these pack journalism issues, frankly… There is no increase in concussions, the number is relatively small… The problem is a journalist issue. “ - Paul Tagliabue

Rickapolis
Rickapolis

@teamusa2014 I remember reading where olympic weight lifters (who were all using steroids) were asked if they knew they would win a gold medal, but also knew that it would take ten years off of their lives, would they still want the medal. It was almost unanimously 'yes'.

IdDoHannahStorm
IdDoHannahStorm

@Rickapolis I think the bigger issue in the concussion case is, if the premise is that brain trauma problems are the result of the accumulation of repeated blows to the head over time; when does that clock start?  The NFL can wholly agree with the repeated blows concept, but argue that by the time players get to the league, they are well on their way to future health problems.  The points that you make about the indoctrination of players to play through the pain place a good deal of responsibility on the players by the time they get to the NFL level.  How many players have just plain lied about their injuries to stay on field?  What other factors are at play?  When assessing blame in a damages case, you look at who contributed and to what extent.  Objectively, the NFL is only partially to blame.

Wombat
Wombat

@Rickapolis The sticking point there will be that the "shake off the cobwebs" mentality wasn't just the NFL but throughout the sport at all levels. If that is taught in the high school locker rooms and colleges then how is that the fault of the NFL alone?

Wombat
Wombat

@ohiojim44 I agree with your points but I lay at least some of the blame at the feet of the NFLPA. They negotiated the contract, ratified and signed it. Right or wrong They agreed to its strictures. Anyone repeatedly failing multiple drug tests costing themselves millions of dollars are displaying classic addictive behavior; physical, psychological, or otherwise. The rules are the rules... until they are changed.

el80ne
el80ne

@ohiojim44 I don't believe Peter ever distinguished between whether Washington was physically or psychologically addicted. That inference came from YOU. 

SkokieDog
SkokieDog

@ohiojim44 I'll be sure to share your bit of wisdom with my neighbor, an addled old man who hasn't been able to shake his need for weed for decades now. It should be easy enough to find him, staring blankly into my backyard one day, although I don't know how easy it may be to get his attention, so he can focus on what I'm saying.

usameos6
usameos6

@lumpy701 It may have been different if the NFL didn't engage in decades of publishing studies with facts and results omitted that did not support their position.  If your employer knowingly engaged in a coverup to keep you working under dangerous conditions when they had information that could have made a difference in your long term health - wouldn't you want them held accountable for it?  



BillRobinson
BillRobinson

@Buck

Why is it so hard for people to recognize Buck derives great pleasure from posting his idiotic criticisms of PK. It doesn't matter what the subject is or the day of the week, Buck is there posting his nonsense. He is a troll. End of story.

Orange Crush
Orange Crush

@Buck2185 He was not negative to Marino at all. In fact it was quite the opposite. He was stating that we don't know all the reasons for his joining the suit and asking that people hold their negativity towards Marino until we know more about his motivation behind it. Reading is fundamental.

Wombat
Wombat

@Buck2185 Ok Buck, I have to ask... why do you continue to read PK's articles? Just to complain? I have seen many here that periodically complain about some idiosyncrasy of Peter's writing, editing, politics, or personal beliefs but you seem to jump on absolutely every single article! If you don't enjoy his work, don't read it. If you continue to do so logic dictates that you are simply a sad and lonely person looking for attention. I do hope that's not the case.

Mike26
Mike26

@blynder @Eric Nielsen Because it's almost a false handicap is no paperwork is ever required to prove worthiness of having one; it's much like purchasing/having handicap placards to park close to important venues (stadiums, hospitals, MALLS, etc.) though you have no handicap whatsoever AND don't transport anyone that does.

Buck2185
Buck2185

@Wombat @liquidmuse3  Peter never states facts, he jumps the gun, sensationalizes everything without regard to fact. It's been that way for 25 years, no reason to expect a change in the next 25....

Mulva
Mulva

@Wombat @liquidmuse3 I think the bigger issue is the damage marijuana does compared to alcohol.


That's why alcohol is ok for players to (ab)use but marijuana isn't, right? Because alcohol is so much safer and better for the body medicinally?


I'm sure it has nothing to do with beer companies being major sponsors of the NFL and its individual clubs, right?


Didn't think so.

TiredOfCliches
TiredOfCliches

@Mike26 Sarcasm only works when you know what you're talking about.  It's a fact that pot is non-addictive.

Rickapolis
Rickapolis

@Wombat @Rickapolis Good point. But it might also go to prove that players are not as responsible, since they've always been lied to. 

Lawyers love this kind of thing.

ShaneInlosangeles
ShaneInlosangeles

@Wombat @ohiojim44  Exactly right Wombat; rather than trying to excuse the player for breaking the rule, people have to understand the NFLPA agreed to the punishments for violations regarding weed use. Do I agree the NFL and the NFLPA need to take a second look at the repercussions for weed use? Yes, absolutely; there's a strong movement in society that does not look at weed use the way it use to in the past. Personally, I have never smoked weed, but I have no issues with those that do. That being said, as I stated in my question/comment in the mailbag, Washington (or any player) breaking the rules in place is a separate issue from trying to change those rules.  

usameos6
usameos6

@Wombat @ohiojim44 Yup - although I think the NFLPA will use the possibility of finalizing HGH testing protocols / agreement as a trade-off with the NFL to lighten up on weed.  

Buck2185
Buck2185

@BillRobinson  Why don't you and Mike26 get together and find out why Peter is pushing gay rights inthe NFL??

Mike26
Mike26

@BillRobinson Apologize now, Bill.  That comment was completely correct and direct - and has no place here on a sports board.  Nearly everyone knows he's a troll = sometimes folks respond, sometimes he posts the same exact thing several times without a peep of a response (except his own to himself).  The best times are when he end up arguing with himself.

blynder
blynder

@Wombat @Buck2185

Don't feed those trolls.  Don't do it.  Just don't do it!  You feed em, next thing you know, you're hearing things at 2am rummaging through your garbage outside and all of your Glam rock from the 80's is suspiciously "sticky"... Just don't feed 'em!

HoppinBill
HoppinBill

@Wombat @Buck2185 Actually logic only dictates that he should stop.  Clearly PK is not the sports writer for him.  Find someone that gives you information you appreciate, Buck. 

Wombat
Wombat

@Mulva @Wombat @liquidmuse3 Actually I think it has more to do with Prohibition going over so well last time that no politician will ever start that up again. So beer is legal. I have more problems with the DUI s that never get prosecuted due to fame than either alcohol or pot. We shouldn't care what folks are doing in private, (within reason of course), but if it endangers someone else it shouldn't be swept under the rug because you play football... or act... or sing... whatever, but with the $$$ involved honest prosecution will never happen for these folks.

SkokieDog
SkokieDog

@Wombat Not a chance; I don't share my snack food stash with the neighbors, addled or not. 

BillRobinson
BillRobinson

I'm very sorry. I don't know what came over me.

Mike26
Mike26

@Buck2185 @Wombat Thanks for your old go-to response:  a personal attack on another person.  Is it possible for you to EVER respond without attacking someone?

Mike26
Mike26

@blynder @Mike26 @Eric Nielsen I've personally seen people take vests off dogs as soon as they get near their vehicles to go home.  This is AFTER they've traipsed through a grocery, mall, or eaten at a restaurant.  I've seen it at LEAST a half-dozen times myself = and I don't go to restaurants much OR frequent malls often.  If I've seen it that many times that past 18 months or so - imagine how many times others have seen it.


If it IS legit then fine - I have no argument.  The only way at this point to have legitimacy is to prove it - like receiving a handicap placard.  Many states have tightened procedures and criteria for getting one of those.  I don't see a major difference in creating an official card/paper/papers that REAL afflicted folks can have and show.  

MoeLarryAndJesus
MoeLarryAndJesus

@Mike26 @Buck2185 @Wombat  It's funny when Mikey pretends he isn't one of this site's leading practitioners when it comes to attacking other posters.  You're a hypocrite, Mikey, like all of your right-wing ilk.

Newsletter