Brent Just/Getty Images
Brent Just/Getty Images

Happy Canada Day

Today marks a national holiday in the True North, and it also marks an end to The MMQB's Canada Week. Was the experiment successful? Readers on both sides of the CFL debate share their thoughts on the coverage

So you swarmed me with emails—more than 1,000 of them—and crammed me with Tweets about our coverage of the Canadian Football League. It’s been a revelation to read these messages, though I haven’t read all of them because I simply cannot. I am going to give you the floor in a moment. But first, a note about why we spent a week covering the CFL in the first place.

Over my 30 years covering the NFL, I’ve noticed (how could you not?) this burgeoning, exploding 24/7 media frenzy around the National Football League. That’s fine. It’s helped me feed my family and live in a nice place. But there’s a point when I say, Enough. From June 20 to July 20, no one in the NFL does anything. But still the coverage continues, nearly unabated. The paralysis by analysis, the polls, the lists, the opinions … It just never ends.

In my opinion, we should pause. We should get away for a while. We should cover other things. We should think of something else for a couple or three or four weeks. The NFL will be there when we get back, and we’ll have 48 weeks to bash it over the head and cover it bigger and better than we just did. So what I felt we should do is cover something else. And why should that not be with real football—the first week of the Canadian Football League season? In the CFL, there are about 210 players you cheered for in college football and who disappeared into the vapor of the great north, plying their trade and making a decent living, and maybe even becoming candidates to play in the NFL. It’s a better version of Triple-A baseball.

Is it so much to ask that for six days a year, or maybe a handful more, we pay attention to them, when the NFL players and coaches and executives are sunning themselves in Kennebunkport? I don’t think so. But that’s why I asked for your opinions, and why in the coming weeks we’ll tell you if we’re going to cover more CFL this year and in the future.

Beach Read

boneyard-part-1-skulls-300


And for something really different, The MMQB is devoting the rest of the week to an original four-part football mystery, Night at the Boneyard, by former Sports Illustrated reporter and editor Bill Syken.


Meet punter Nick Gallow, who thought he was escaping it all on an off-season trip to Montana but finds that even amid the grandeur of the Rockies, trouble has a way of tracking him down . . .


Night at the Boneyard, Part I

So, your thoughts follow. I’d say your email was something like 80 percent wanting more CFL coverage, 10 percent saying stick to the NFL, and 10 percent “I wouldn’t be caught dead reading about the CFL.”

Your email:

EVEN MAYOCK STARTED IN THE CFL. I have to admit I love seeing coverage of the CFL by Americans. We have, like in the U.S., ESPN Classic but a Canadian version. I was watching a CFL game from the 1990’s on ESPN2. The announcing team? Gus Johnson and Mike Mayock. So even some announcers honed their craft in the CFL. I think my favourite part of the league is exactly what you and Jenny touched upon in the stories you did. The league is a lot more human. The players are so down to earth and, I guess, humble to a certain extent. There are some exceptions, as always, but there’s such a sense of community in this league. I know players are really happy about the league’s broadcasting deal with ESPN so that family and friends can watch them as well. I think it’s important for Americans to understand what the league is and who plays in it. I think a shift is already happening. Marc Trestman getting a job was a big boost to the league (even if it weakened the Alouettes). I don’t know any CFL fan who isn’t hoping he does well. 

—Jared Book, Montreal

***

PLAYING FOR PASSION, NOT DOLLARS. Peter, I think you should abandon NFL coverage and go to Canada full time. Let me preach on it.  When I read about your idea to highlight CFL coverage, I was nonplussed. Why? Who cares? Then after reading every article, your MMQB staff is great. I love that their salary cap is $5M. I love that their fans are real fans and not wine and cheese types looking for a place to be seen. I love that their players seem more vested in their cities and towns. Really, it boils down to I love that they play for passion and not dollars. Sign me up.

—Mike Yoder, Concord, N.C.

***

NO MORE CFL COLUMNS. I’m an avid reader of The MMQB and look forward to reading it every week. However, I couldn’t possible care any less about Canadian football. I’m completely disinterested in every article y’all have written about it. I would love if we never had another column about it.

—Jeremy C. Wilkins, The University of Texas School of Law 2014

***

FOOTBALL BUSINESS BOMBARDMENT. I want to see more of the CFL. I remember the energy of Baltimore’s CFL team for a period in the mid-nineties. Despite what seem some unusual or gimmicky rules, your account, and others such as that of Marc Trestman last week, depict a pure and exciting game. I’m an NFL fan, but feel bombarded by the ‘NFL is a business’ mantra and the constant need to grow bigger and take more of the media landscape. The CFL simply comes across as more of a game, and less of a business, with just as much passion by players and fans as we seen in NFL hotbeds.

—Tom Farkas, Fishersville, Va.

The CFL is a league worth covering because it presents professional football in a context the NFL cannot: it’s played primarily for the love of the game, rather than the highly refined product at the center of a billion dollar industry.

***

BRING CFL STATESIDE. Your CFL coverage over the last week has absolutely fascinated me. I’ll bet that the YouTube searches for “rouge” skyrocketed on Monday. I know I looked up several videos, which then led to watching the pre-snap wide receiver chaos, which then led to my saying “ah, screw it,” and watching major stretches of several games. But my interest in The MMQB’s coverage has not stemmed so much from the NFL being on hiatus as it has a genuine interest in something that is familiar enough to enjoy, new enough to pique, and frenetic enough to excite. That said, with the dearth of real football news in June and July, what if the CFL were to hold a few games in the U.S., like the NFL does in London? They could start off with one game at MetLife Stadium, close enough that plenty of Canadian fans could make the trip, but do it on a Saturday night and broadcast it nationwide.

—George T. Ligon II 

***

MORE CANADA, LESS JOHNNY. Superb coverage from you and Ms. Vrentas this week.  Amazing how you both captured so much of the charm of the CFL during your brief visits.  It is a credit to your respective skills as observers and writers. The guest writers were also excellent. I do hope The MMQB continues to cover the CFL because it is a league worth covering, even if that fact doesn’t cause the “click count” to rise. It is a league worth covering because it presents professional football in a context the NFL cannot: professional football played primarily for the love of the game, rather than the highly refined product at the center of a billion dollar industry. The MMQB readers who have never followed CFL football should give it a try. At worst, you’ll waste a few minutes watching a fast-paced, exciting and highly entertaining brand of football before clicking over to the latest account of what Johnny Football did in Vegas and at best you may someday find yourself in a packed stadium under a beautiful prairie summer sky wearing a watermelon on your head and cheering along with a giant gopher.

—Gord, Edmonton 

***

TRY TO BUILD A CFL AUDIENCE. You asked for input on the CFL week so here goes. Aside from the one NFL story you posted, I didn’t read a single article on your site this week. I have zero interest in the CFL. Believe me, I understand this is a slow period for current NFL news or transactions. Still, this is a great opportunity to provide some in depth NFL analysis, player profiles, great moments in NFL history, or some oddball stories.
This isn’t to say the CFL should be ignored. By all means cover it. In fact, had there been more NFL stories sprinkled in, I’m sure I would have read several of them. But since there was almost zero NFL coverage I had little reason to stick around. I only read this column because Peter was the author.
 My advice: rather than bombard us with one week of blitz coverage, try and build an audience by providing regular CFL coverage.

—Greg Kazarian

***

THANKS FOR THE REMINDER. As a native resident of Medicine Hat, I hope you enjoyed your time in our city, and enjoyed the CFL games this weekend as much as I did.
 Sometimes it takes an outsider’s perspective to help remind us of what we love so much about something that has been a part of our lives for so long. Reading your articles all week got me thinking about why I love the CFL game, and what about it do I understand that my NFL-only loving friends don’t. I love the CFL because my dad did, and because I hopefully get to pass that same love on to my son.
Your articles all week long “got” this, and it helped me to realize it too. Thank you for your outstanding look into our game. Regardless of whether you offer more CFL coverage throughout the year, you’ve earned a new fan.

—Keith,
 Medicine Hat

***

NEW TV CONTRACT WILL HELP CFL. The columns this week were well-written, sincere and offered incredible insight into the way the game is played in Canada, and how much it means to Canadians. I’m a CFL fan (Riders), NFL fan (Packers) and NCAA fan (LSU) and I believe that this experiment in expanding coverage will show that there is a lot of synergy between those three levels of football. There are more and more examples of guys who don’t fit the NFL mold choosing the CFL as a viable option to keep their career going. The new TV contract with ESPN will also help more players to realize there is a good option for them north of the border.

—Gerard

Canada Week was a good experiment but please never again. BORING. There are too many interesting stories in the NFL.  

***

SIX REASONS TO LOVE CFL. I enjoy the CFL coverage for the following reasons:

1.       The Curiosity Factor: It’s cool how a sport which shares many of the basic rules with the NFL can be so different. If the NFL is looking for ways to improve offenses, north of the border seems like a good place to start.

2.       The See-‘em Again factor: Those Buckeye fans who wanted Troy Smith to have the chance to strut his stuff in the new mobile-QB NFL got an eyeful of why he never did. Yeah, the wind was blowing, but it was for the other QB too. Plus, Chad Johnson, because!

3.       The See-‘em First Factor: With your coverage, maybe we’ll see the next Joe Kapp, or Doug Flutie, or the first Duron Carter. My ‘Skins will never sign Carter since he‘s not an already-expensive name, but maybe the 49ers would.

4.       The Nostalgia Factor: I remember watching CFL games in the ‘70’s on the local UHF channel, trying to twist that round antenna just so to make some sense out of things. It tided me over until the NFL started.

5.       The Humility Factor: Like players in the WNBA, CFLers seem to bask in the chance to get paid for playing the game they love, and to do it against guys who aren’t the size of Mack Trucks. Maybe those guys get a second look “down south” as a result of your coverage.

6.       The Not-The-NFL Factor: Hey, it’s professional football two months before the season starts! What’s not to like?   

—Chris Atwell, Adamstown, Md.

***

A MONTREAL CONVERT. As a long time MMQB reader and current Montreal resident, I must say that I truly enjoyed your series of articles regarding the CFL. Ironically, even though I am a huge football fan (yearly trips to Buffalo to see the Bills), I did not care much for the CFL until I started reading your series of articles. It made me see it through you and your teams’ eyes, and I must admit that I read your articles with the same level of interest as if I was reading a typical MMQB/NFL-centred column. I don’t know if it’s a testimonial of you and your team’s work, or the CFL, but anyway, keep it coming!As we say in Quebec : Merci beaucoup.

—Hugues, Montreal

***

STRATEGY IS WHAT MAKES THE CFL. Thanks Peter for coming up here and covering the CFL and, yes please, do give us more in the future. I’m an American—a Bostonian and still a Patriots season ticket holder—but I’ve been living here in Toronto for four years and plan to make this home.  You were smart to go to Regina—Canada’s best football city—but unfortunately you missed the best game of the weekend, Edmonton at BC.  Unlike the other three games, it was a close, competitive one, with Edmonton coming back from behind to win on the road. The best thing about the game, though, was the little creative touches you rarely see in the NFL. There was a fake field goal, with a perfectly executed shovel pass to the running back for a first down. And a surprise onside kick, with a brilliant toe-tapping sideline catch, that allowed Edmonton to keep the ball for two straight drives.

The reason I love watching the CFL is really the same reason I love watching the Patriots –under Bill Belichick—the strategy. The NFL is a great game, but most of the coaching tends to be conservative. I love watching both the American and Canadian versions of the same game. They are similar in many respects, but the variations in the rules create strategic diversity which leads to different styles of play that require players with a different set of skills.  It’s football in two flavours (tell your editor that’s the proper Canadian spelling)—still the same great game, but richer because of the differences and the resulting variety in strategy and playing style. It’s like having two official languages, French and English: vive la différence!

—Rob Lewis, Toronto

***

GOOD IDEA. There are CFL rules that I think the NFL should consider. Such as, the game must end on a play. None of this getting down to 35 seconds and letting the clock run down.

—Bob Weisengoff

***

THANK YOU. I loved the coverage of the CFL. Your team did an excellent job. I’m now interested in it more and will follow it on my own. I don’t expect MMQB to cover it like the NFL, but I think checking in on it and covering the playoffs would be good call. Great job exposing us all to this game with our wonderful neighbors to the North.

—Daryl Carver

***

MIX UP THE COVERAGE. It was nice learning about the CFL, but Canada week’s coverage was too one-sided—all the good stuff, but none of the bad. A league hasn’t had this much praise since Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier. Why didn’t you have anyone criticize the league and explain why they feel the NFL offers a superior product?

—Zev Roth

***

ONE WEEK HELPS. As an American who grew up in Wisconsin and Winnipeg, and then decided to go to university in Wolfville, Nova Scotia, I’ve had a fair bit more exposure to the CFL than most. I’ve spent far too many nights drunkenly debating my friends from Regina about which league was better, NFL or CFL. They would win with history, I with the Packers. They would argue for the speed of the game, I would point to the Packers. They would complain about all the glitz and glamour without substance of the NFL, I would complain about the damnedable rouge. It’s good to see the CFL get its fair shake though. It’s a good game and I know few fans more rabid than the Roughriders’ lot. I liked the coverage and think one week a year can only help.

—Dave, Wisconsin

***

AMERICAN APPRECIATION. Wow, you weren’t kidding about Canadian appreciation. I thought maybe the first page to start, but the whole column? Yeesh. Too much detail on a sport I only wonder about when my team picks up a player from the CFL. Here is my feedback: I’m an NFL junkie and have no desire at all to become a fan of a different league. Just doesn’t interest me. I’ll look forward to American Appreciation Mondays when the MMQB returns from its trip north.

—Marima

***

NEVER AGAIN, THANK YOU. I love the column and read it every week. Canada Week was a good experiment but please never again. BORING. There are too many interesting stories in the NFL. Keep up the good work but stay south of the border.

—Anonymous

TALK BACK

Got a question for Peter? Send it with your name and hometown to talkback@themmqb.com and it might be included in next Tuesday's mailbag.

***

HOPE THE NFL WAS READING. Loved it. You guys are at your best when our covering things I can’t read on the bottom line. I thought Canada Week was awesome. They obviously play legit football up there, and I think the NFL could probably learn a few things about innovation both from a rules standpoint and a game strategy standpoint. Mostly just great to hear stories I haven’t heard before.

—Jack Balaban

***

MMQB CANADA? HMMMM. I can best describe the CFL coverage as ‘cute.’ The rules differences were interesting to read about, as well as some of the coverage of the various personalities, but going into things like players of the week regarding people we’ve never heard of is a bit much. I just scrolled right through. Why not just start a MMQB Canada version if it’s so popular? No need to dilute your outstanding NFL coverage with it. And that’s not at all anything against the level of play or the people of Canada!

—Aryeh, Israel 

***

THANK YOU AGAIN. I have been a longtime reader of the MMQB, and I would like to say thank you for your coverage on the CFL last week. The articles from your staff were top notch, and really captured everything a new fan should know about the game. There was no better coach in the league in the five years Coach Trestman was in Montreal for (that is painful to admit, as the Argos are my hometown team), and I learned a ton from his article last week. I also really enjoyed Emily Kaplan’s article on Jon Cornish, and how CFL players hold second jobs to support them in addition to a CFL salary.

—Stacey Wilson, Toronto

mmqb-end-slug-square

More from The MMQB
48 comments
BettyLi
BettyLi

Love the Canada week coverage. Started watching CFL here in NYC last season and have become a huge fan of this fast paced style of gridiron. Nice to learn a bit about its long history. Hope this becomes a regular feature. Big Giants and Argos fan.  Take Care , Betty

rocknitout
rocknitout

Peter and team,


I loved Canada week. I don't see how anyone could really complain about it, but people will always complain about something. 


I would like to see you add a regular column covering the CFL. I imagine you'd have to hire another writer but it maybe could be someone with a unique perspective on that league. I for one would enjoy reading it, and definitely in large part due to your coverage, I'll be tuning into some games on ESPN this season. Thanks again.

2001mark
2001mark

Born, raised Toronto, & while I don't love the Argos as much as I admire the CFL sport & heritage proper, I was very pleased to see MMQB go at it... esp. when it wasn't a stunt so much as a literal 'We wanted to try something different for football in the dead of NFL summer'.


Summer is a large part of why I DO love the CFL.  Sure our 100+ yrs old Grey Cup is mentioned on Countdown every November, but that's one wkend in the cold.  What I appreciate most is that it's real legit football all summer long in the great outdoors lols... which isn't beach or flag or pre-season.  


Once the Argos find a new more intimate outdoor home, & once Halifax joins the party from a true national league, then I'll probably extend even more love than I already do.



As for MMQB going forward, might I suggest for mainstream fans next summer more insight on former NCAAF stars, NFL castoffs, &/or potential NFL free agents.  Crossover appeal might tie it in better with the average MMQB... however like you said, 80% of us enjoyed it as is.


The CFL is to football as MLS is to soccer... while MLS is not the Barclay's Premier League, it doesn't need to be & thrives on being its own persona.  I'm sure some MLS fans around the US might agree.

staceyjamesm
staceyjamesm

Peter, I deeply appreciate your recent analysis of the CFL, the best football league in North America.

Frankly, until you met with Brian Williams, one of the worlds' most accomplished sports' reporters, I had never heard of you. However, I have read a number of the comments from the general public as well as Doug Flutie's, Jenny's, etc.

To those arrogant Americans who believe they are "world champions" in every sport and think your coverage of the CFL was BORING, I give them the middle finger salute.

In the NFL, you have a shorter and narrower field and 40 second time clock in order to make ten yards. So, run, run, maybe run again or pass to a receiver who is supported by a rich family. Tell your readers' to read Doug Flutie's input.

So, you need four tries to make ten yards, allow a punt returner to call a "fair catch" because he is afraid to have the s___t beat out of him and a time clock that does not allow a comeback for the team currently losing.

Talk about BOOOOORRRRRING.

aleader
aleader

Let's get a few things straight.  The CFL is the first modern pro football league in the world, not the NFL. The NFL rules/field are the oddballs here, not the CFL.  Been playing rugby in Canada since 1860, and football as we know it since 1909.  This 'Americans invented everything' attitude is truly American and is ingrained on them at birth.  Not surprising in a country that declares itself 'world champions' in sports that only exist in the US.  The only truly world sports are hockey, and to a lesser extent soccer.  The CFL was also the higher paying league until the early 80's when huge swaths of yanks became couch potatoes and provided the NFL with a swollen TV contract.  400M people vs 35M.  You do the math.  They're both great leagues, and judging by how dominant players in the CFL also dominate in the NFL (recently Brandon Browner, Cam Wake, Jerrell Freeman), the talent is roughly the same.   Keep it coming Peter!


Alan

eddie767
eddie767

I find it strange that most, who like fb, don't or won't read about the CFL. I say this b/c some of the biggest 80s/90s stars not to mention a HoFer came from this league. Now, some of these ppl are also the same ones who don't like PK's opinionated points, but not to read something b/c of 100 words out of 6000, is stupid imo. Write what you like most will read it and some might even watch a game, since it's still fb w/some strange rules. Who knows, one of those players might even make the one play that helps your NFL team win the SB. Then they can say, I saw him do the same thing in Canada. Nah, just wish full thinking.

TimBell
TimBell

 Peter thanks again and for the summation - I am liking the 80/20 split in support of more CFL considering the usual negativity around all things internet posted or tweeted I think that is a terrific #. I am firmly entrenched in the more coverage camp! Much appreciated for all of the great coverage to you and the crew! Long Live the CFL!

LanceCharlesWhittakerr
LanceCharlesWhittakerr

On average just under a million people in Canada watch a regular season CFL game, there are only about 30 million people in Canada, so 1 in 30 watch this great game !! now to put in perspective American don't even come close to 1 in 30 watching the no fun league in America !!

baldeagle1313
baldeagle1313

To all of you who are groaning about CFL coverage and how you don't want to see it anymore, too damn bad. I have to put up with endless coverage of soccer, a sport about which I don't think it's possible that I could care less about. Do I moan and complain about the media coverage it gets? No, I just ignore it. I don't write commentary and rant about how it should not be a part of the sports reporting landscape, because I realize that it millions of people like it and want to read about it. I know it isn't all about me - something you complainers apparently have yet to learn. It's called being a grownup. If you don't want to read about a particular subject, don't. 

ashimizuishi
ashimizuishi

don't know if this was touched anywhere in MMQB but would have loved to see a interview with the one QB who is both a CFL Hall of Famer and a NFL Hall of Famer. he could have provided great insight into the CFL unlike any other.

deedoublejay
deedoublejay

I've been reading your column for many years. I loved the CFL coverage, Peter. I hope you'll provide some small amount of coverage in the future. No need to do all-CFL week again. Just an occasional story of note, or history piece. You could write about what people don't like about the CFL (as noted elsewhere in the comments), the brief expansion into the U.S., or CFL naming conventions. The B.C. Lions have the only common name out of 9 teams. What the hell is a RedandBlack? Are the Edmonton Eskimos the CFL's Washington Redskins? How do Inuit feel about the name?

Keep up the good work.

Lesterclan
Lesterclan

Peter,

Here are some other suggestions for future "experiments"...I remember watching in the 1970's Demolition Derby, Roller Derby, Evel Knevel, Candle Pin Bowling...how about we cover Australian Rules Football or Cricket?  Ooooh, Streaking was big in the 70's.  That sounds like a fun column to do. 

Just suggesting

Lesterclan
Lesterclan

Wow, what a "puff piece", Peter.  No matter how much you try to fluff and shine the CFL and make it a Cadillac, in the end it's still just an Edsel.

BillRobinson
BillRobinson

Once again, I enjoyed the readers' comments in the last week. I sure didn't miss the cynics and trolls who participate so much in the usual readers' comments. New comments, fresh perspectives.

localidiot
localidiot

Peter, you and/or Jenny will have to come back for the Grey Cup. It's the 4th of July, Thanksgiving, and the Super Bowl on the same day. It's in November and nobody complains that it's in a 'cold weather city'. It's when people who don't care about football go to football parties. Mounties bring out the cup. It turns 102 this year. It's Canada's party and everyone's invited. 

RonDavies
RonDavies

Interesting to note that the word rouge is making somewhat of a comeback.  In my 40 some years of watching CFL the word rouge was almost never used.  It was only used by Americans when talking about the so called "quirky" CFL rules. The word that always described the action was a "single"  Miss the field goal, they don't run it out, you get a single.


It's kind of like how American claim Canadians say "aboot".  I've never heard anyone say that in my life just as no one used the word rouge.


But now that ESPN has the new TV contract, some of the commentators will feel they have to kiss the butt of the Americans tuning in and call it a rouge, so I've heard it a few times lately.

RonDavies
RonDavies

Peter, have to agree with your take on the 24/7 media frenzy surrounding major pro sports.  It's become the same way in Canada surrounding hockey.  I think I am one of those who is becoming turned off by the cult of celebrity and entitlement of many (not all) of today's athletes.


Pampered and privileged, given free education, and still many emerging illiterate to remuneration most of us can never dream of and still being boorish ingrates.  There is a reason it's sometimes called the National Felon League and there are many like me who have tuned out.


I used to love sports as a child (in the 70s) but basically watch none of the big four NA leagues.  CFL football is probably my only refuge.  I don't need the non stop social engagement of fantasy pools and drafts and any other ruse to somehow try and monetize my involvement.  Can't I just watch a game without be inundated by the surrounding crap?  Will the overexposure someday kill the Golden Goose?  It has with me.

ProfessorGriff
ProfessorGriff

Marc Trestman - he will be back coaching in the CFL in two more years

mike202
mike202

After reading the CFL Week my neighbor and I decided to buy some tickets to a Calgary game later in July.  I live in N. Idaho and Calgary is actually closer than Seattle.  Add in a number of local players playing for Calgary and in the CFL and the whole thing looks like a blast.


I would love to see a CFL team in Spokane, a city that seems to be a perfect fit for a CFL team.

Peter Parker1
Peter Parker1

It's odd how a CFL team in Canada's biggest population and multimedia market (Toronto) can't get a buyer.  The multimedia communications giants that together own all the other major pro sport teams in the area (Rogers and Bell) aren't interested.  In fact, the Toronto Argonauts are owned by the same guy who owns the BC Lions, David Braley.  It would have been worthwhile to get an exclusive interview with him to get his perspecitves on the CFL's recent past (mid 80s onward) because he was a key factor in keeping the whole league (and not just those two   franchises) afloat when times were tough.


MMurchison
MMurchison

If you decide that the CFL is worth a few words in your column each week or maybe you decide to have a writer do a weekly piece on what's going on in the CFL I have a couple of suggestions.  When you are throwing out player names I think it would be very helpful for the U.S. readers if you attached their college to the name.  It may jar memories of watching these same players play in college for regional readers giving people some connection to the people playing in the league.  I also think talking about family connections to the NFL would be a good thing to continue.  You mentioned the names Tasker and Carter and their NFL lineage, but many CFL players have siblings playing in the NFL as well, again, this would provide American readers another way to connect to the CFL players.  Finally, if possible, some video links to illustrate the differences talked about or maybe a great play from the week would be helpful.  There are great athletes in the CFL who make great football plays every week, many of them don't fit the 'mold' for a position in the NFL and end up north, but athletically, most are probably on par with the average NFL player.  There have been solid NFL players who came north and didn't succeed, because the games are different.  Thank you again for doing something different and taking a look at football in Canada.

ea10
ea10

"The University of Texas School of Law 2014"


:eyeroll:


Sincerely,

ea10, Mississippi State University, Graduate School of Business, 2012

AdamCooper
AdamCooper

@aleader As another Canadian... i really don't think hockey is more of a world sport than soccer, cold countries still get summer, hot countries do not, so the numbers are not even close. Also, hockey is incredibly more expensive to play than soccer, so it also depends on the economic situation in said country. That being said it is still more worldwide than baseball, basketball or football. The one plus for hockey is we do have the humility to call our champion the Stanley Cup Champion, not World Champion

AdamCooper
AdamCooper

@eddie767 in Canada we have many fans who are only interested in the NHL and won't take a look at the AHL or CHL. These are dismissively known as 'NHL fans', relative to the true 'hockey fans'. This article seems to have separated the NFL fans from the true football fans in America.

DaveStanley
DaveStanley

@Lesterclan Well as the other sports mention are not "Gridiron Football" that would jut be stupid, you sound like the guy who responds to gay marriage with "where will this end will you be able to marry a horse next", like no no and no, the two sports are related therefore relevant, as a Canadian I love both, if you dont like it dont read it

localidiot
localidiot

@Lesterclan From your comment I can only come to two possible conclusions: a) that you didn't actually read the articles and therefore don't know what you're talking about, or b) that you read the articles and didn't understand a word.

KeithPottruff
KeithPottruff

@Lesterclan I'm going out on a limb here and say that you didn't like it?  As a Canadian I'll admit that I liked hearing a different perspective on our brand of football.  

blynder
blynder

@RonDavies

Don't forget that cabal of owners who profit off of those under-educated (some of them) players, climbing ticket-prices and the infusion of profit into so many aspects of the game.  Heh.

unitcaptain11
unitcaptain11

@ProfessorGriff No he won't.  He is already doing a good job and has proven he has more on the ball than at least 10 or 12 NFL "retread" coaches who keep getting jobs.

ScottTuckydeHaan
ScottTuckydeHaan

Are you going to the Hamilton game on July 18? I'll be making the trip! The Ticats are the time I was raised on and have been a die hard fan since I was a kid. I'll buy ya a beer and you can party with us! Oskee Wee Wee!

RonDavies
RonDavies

@Peter Parker1 Makes me laugh that the wannabe Toronto media under the thumb of... well you know who... (trying to avoid a lawsuit) portray Braley (re CFL) as a Jed Clampett type of hick who can do no right and yet Bon Jovi (re NFL) gets the Warren Buffett treatment.  Laughable when you consider Braley is worth three times as much.


The reason those conglomerates aren't interested (aside from Bell) is that they want the CFL out so they can bring the NFL in.  They have no qualms about killing a 141 year old institution and yet they're offered protection from foreign competitors by the government.  Not fair!

DonaldMitchell
DonaldMitchell

@Peter Parker1 Are you from Toronto or the US? Just curious.


Toronto is a strange place in regards to the Canadian sports world. They automatically assume that the Blue Jays and Raptors should be supported by all Canadians coast to coast but they pointedly refuse to show a modicum of respect for a wholly Canadian sports league. They consider themselves a world class city and that they shouldn't be subjected to watching Saskatchewan or Winnipeg playing against the Toronto team. They would much rather watch New York or LA while failing to consider that maybe LA or New York (or Green Bay for that matter) don't really want to watch a foreign team at all.

Another beef with Toronto is that their media is completely and embarrassingly focused on the United States. All of their stories are about the Leafs (which in spite of the number of Canadians playing; is run by the US), MLB, NFL and NCAA while completely ignoring the outstanding athletes in the Canadian Inter-university Sport (CIS) system. 

It is funny that maybe this series from an american sports writer will give the CFL legitimacy and respect in the Toronto market.

I'm not holding my breath.

usameos6
usameos6

@ea10 Did you note the typo in the e-mail as well:


"I couldn’t possible care any less about Canadian football" ..... 'that's why you're the judge and I'm the law talking guy' - Lionel Hutz, Attorney at Law


mike202
mike202

@ea10 You have to admit the CFL is much more interesting than UT football.

SteveRowFla
SteveRowFla

@ea10 Hey, this might be the first time the budding bloodsucker is published!

baldeagle1313
baldeagle1313

@unitcaptain11 @ashimizuishi Moon. It isn't real hard to find out what Moon thinks about the CFL, he's been very forthright. I'd be stunned it there weren't multiple YouTube videos of his interviews.

RonDavies
RonDavies

@blynder @RonDavies I'm not feeling too much sympathy for either the players or owners as can usually be evidenced by most fan's reaction during a work stoppage.

Peter Parker1
Peter Parker1

I like how the CIS is about student-athletes and not the other wide around as what it seems to be in major and Div 2 NCAA programs.  I sure hope the CIS stays the way it is but even    now there is much pressure to try to become part of the NCAA umbrella.  That would be a big mistake.

RonDavies
RonDavies

@DonaldMitchell @Peter Parker1 It's great that SI is giving the rub to something Canadian and to the league much of the Toronto media and its controlling conglomerate wants to rub out.  Thanks again SI for pissing off so many clueless hacks and wannabes who can't see something good right in front of their face.


These guys want to praise the almighty NFL and denigrate (and kill) the home product and yet a big American player like SI is basically telling them that the hate they're spreading is a bunch of poop.  And they can't do anything because they fawn all over SI and can't disagree with them.  LOVE IT!

RonDavies
RonDavies

@Peter Parker1 Pretty difficult for a CIS team to get involved with NCAA, lots of factors involved.

If you want a real eye opener to the CIS vs NCAA listen to the PTS interview with Carleton's basketball coach Dave Smart.  Remember Carleton is the team that whupped Final Four side Wisconsin in the preseason. 

Aside from the most elite athletes like Wiggins and Stauskas, Smart makes the case that the CIS is a far better development environment for players.  It is fascinating and illuminating stuff.  Interview starts at 21:40

http://pmd.fan590.com/podcasts/pts/pt_20140408_190610--Prime-Time-Sports---April-8---6pm.mp3

Newsletter