Road to Houston

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Humans of the Super Bowl

On our winding, 2,700-mile drive from New York to Houston, we encountered lots of fans and friendly faces. They're all looking forward to the big game on Sunday

The Longest Snap

The strange tale of the snap that almost wasn’t, before the kick that won Super Bowl XXXVIII

The Road to Super Bowl 51

The MMQB arrived in Houston to all the glitz and glamour of the NFL’s biggest stage. But just like the players and coaches in this game, we took a long, winding journey to get here

The Ballad of Quintorris Jones

Eventually known simply as ‘Julio,’ the star receiver was always larger than life in his Alabama hometown, whether he likes it or not

Where Malcolm Butler Was Made

In a nondescript strip mall in Alabama, a little-known Division II prospect once trained for his shot at the NFL. He’s a star now, but Butler still comes back to this gym

Day 8: $10 Per Yawn

Nearly 2,000 miles in, and approaching the home stretch, The MMQB works out with an old-school trainer

Day 6: Hard Hats & Feelings

A tour of the Falcons’ new stadium (under construction) and why one store owner won’t sell Sam Adams beer in Georgia

Day 5: Rare Birds, Good Burgers

Actual falcons are rara aves in Georgia, but a little outside Atlanta we got a display of falconry from Nimbus, and back downtown—in a skyscraper 53 stories above the Georgia Dome—we met Spencer and Kate, the city’s nesting pair of peregrines

Day 4: HOOTY HOO!

On the trail of Super Bowl 51 stories, The MMQB road trip set up camp in Atlanta and spent time with two of the Falcons’ most stylish fans

Arthur Blank’s Fixer-Upper

In turning the Falcons from a mediocrity into a Super Bowl franchise, billionaire owner Arthur Blank drew on the same principles that made his other business—Home Depot—a juggernaut. You’d do a little victory dance, too

Dan Quinn: From William & Mary to the Super Bowl

Like many in the coaching line, Dan Quinn started at the bottom, working 60-hour weeks and doing the dirty work. Even at his first stint, he showed the traits—no-nonsense grinder, quick learner, good communicator—that would eventually take him and the Falcons to the Super Bowl

Matt Ryan Is Old School

At Philly’s venerable Penn Charter, they remember Matt Ryan as a low-key, egalitarian leader for whom a team win, not stats or stature, was the priority. The Falcons QB has carried that ethos all the way to Super Bowl 51

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