Heinz Kluetmeier/Sports Illustrated/The MMQB
Heinz Kluetmeier/Sports Illustrated/The MMQB

The Failure Was Total

It was another big-game loss for Peyton Manning, but the blame for the Broncos’ 43-8 Super Bowl humiliation extends across the board, to every aspect of the team’s performance: coaching, preparation and execution

By
Greg A. Bedard
· More from Greg·

EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. — Sometimes what happens in football doesn’t make for an exciting story, but there are inches and web pages to fill. Sometimes there isn’t much to get into a screaming televised debate about, but there are hours of programming to fill.

So you’ll hear a lot of talk about the legacy of Broncos quarterback Peyton Manning in the coming week, after his team took a 43-8 beating at the hands of the Seahawks in Super Bowl XLVIII on Sunday night at MetLife Stadium.

Can’t win the big one.

Puts up gaudy statistics in the regular season, but doesn’t get it done in the playoffs when it counts.

(That’s the general public’s perception; not someone’s legacy.)

The truth about Super Bowl XLVIII is simply this: The Broncos, not just Manning, lost to a far superior team. They were underprepared, out-coached and, most importantly, out-executed across the board in all three phases of the game.

That’s it. That’s how you wind up with the biggest Super Bowl blowout in 21 years, since the Cowboys beat the Bills 52-17 in Super Bowl XXVII.

It was a complete debacle for the Broncos from the opening play of scrimmage, when center Manny Ramirez snapped the ball over Manning’s head and into the end zone for a safety. The error happened because the Broncos went with a verbal cadence instead of a silent snap count.

“It was real loud and none of us heard the snap count,” Ramirez said. “I thought I heard [Manning’s] voice. Again, there is no explanation for it.”

Denver said it had prepared for Harvin’s speed but appeared caught out on two jet sweeps that went for long gains. (John Biever/Sports Illustrated/The MMQB)
Denver said it had prepared for Harvin’s speed but appeared caught out on two jet sweeps that went for long gains. (John Biever/Sports Illustrated/The MMQB)

The Broncos did not expect the crowd noise to be a factor, since the game was being played at a neutral field. Coach John Fox, who took the Panthers to Super Bowl XXXVIII against the Patriots, and offensive coordinator Adam Gase underestimated the crowd noise to start the game. That was a critical error.

“That’s the way the start of any Super Bowl is: It’s going to be loud,” said receiver Wes Welker, who was playing in his third Super Bowl. “The fans are going to be yelling. They don’t really know why they’re yelling—it’s just the start of the Super Bowl. We didn’t prepare very well for that, and it showed.”

That gave the Seahawks a 2-0 lead and the ball back. They ran one play, Marshawn Lynch up the middle for a short gain, and then sprang receiver Percy Harvin on a 30-yard jet sweep around the left end, bringing Seattle into field-goal range at the Denver 31. The Broncos said they prepared for the talented but oft-injured Harvin in the run-up to the game, but it didn’t show on that play, or on a 15-yard Harvin run later in the quarter.

Broncos right end Robert Ayers stopped and stood flat-footed as soon as he came out of his stance, which allowed tight end Luke Willson to gain inside leverage and seal the inside part of the alley designed for Harvin. On the outside, cornerback Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie was so unaware of what was going on that he was defending the pass, and receiver Doug Baldwin was able to easily ride him out of bounds.

“I don’t think anybody embodies outhitting an opponent more than Kam Chancellor.” —Dan Quinn, Seahawks defensive coordinator

“He came out there and he ran lightning fast, and we’ve got to be able to contain that,” linebacker Danny Trevathan said of Harvin. “It wasn’t nothing that we didn’t see. It was just the way we handled it and the way we went about it. We should’ve made more plays.”

It was 5-0 before Manning and the Broncos’ offense, which set league records for points and passing yards in the regular season, got their first executed snap with 10:21 left in the first quarter. On second-and-7, Manning thought he had receiver Demaryius Thomas coming clean on a crossing route as cornerback Byron Maxwell got delayed fighting around rub routes from Wes Welker and Julius Thomas. Demaryius Thomas had open turf with Maxwell trailing way behind, but neither he nor Manning saw strong safety Kam Chancellor lurking in the middle of the field. Thomas took a jarring, tone-setting hit from Chancellor after his second step for just a 2-yard gain.

“Tackling the catch” was a key component to Seattle’s strategy—big hits by the likes of Chancellor limited Denver’s gains. (Walter Iooss Jr./Sports Illustrated/The MMQB)
“Tackling the catch” was a key component to Seattle’s strategy—big hits by the likes of Chancellor limited Denver’s gains. (Walter Iooss Jr./Sports Illustrated/The MMQB)

“For us, we knew tackling the catch was going to be as big as anything,” said Seahawks defensive coordinator Dan Quinn. “And I don’t think anybody embodies outhitting an opponent more than Kam Chancellor. He’s as physical as they come.”

That play also revealed the Seahawks’ game plan against Manning and his quartet of talented targets: receivers Demaryius Thomas, Eric Decker and Welker and tight end Julius Thomas. The Seahawks felt very comfortable with linebacker K.J. Wright taking Julius Thomas one-on-one. That’s extremely important, because it allowed Chancellor to play much of the game as a free-roaming robber in the middle of the field. With skilled edge cornerbacks Richard Sherman and Maxwell able to handle Demaryius Thomas and Decker, and with Wright on Julius Thomas, free safety Earl Thomas could play as the middle-of-the-field deep safety, and Chancellor could fluctuate between Welker, a safety valve for Manning, and helping on designed crossing routes. The key for Chancellor was reading Manning’s eyes.

“There’s a lot of quarterbacks that look off [the safeties] a lot,” said Quinn, “but he’s able to get rid of the ball so quickly that there’s not a lot of look offs just because of the nature of the Broncos’ offense]. It’s not a deep-route [offense] where a quarterback may drop and look for someplace else to go. So that was important for us.”

The kind of coverage the Seahawks were playing—and they changed up looks from Cover 1 robber (man under one deep safety, other safety as a robber) to two man (two deep safeties) to Cover 3 (two cornerbacks and one safety split deep in thirds across the field) and two deep, five under (zone across underneath two deep safeties) – can be beaten with vertical routes. That was the issue for the Broncos and why this matchup favored the Seahawks: Denver isn’t a deep-route team, because Manning doesn’t have the same arm strength after four neck surgeries, and you need time in the pocket for those routes to develop against the physical coverage used by the Seahawks. Manning didn’t come close to receiving an adequate amount of time in the pocket.

manning-harrassed-op6d-83987-mid-WALTER-IOOSS-JR
Constant pressure by the Seahawks’ front four made Manning uncomfortable all night and allowed Seattle to use seven men in coverage, a huge advantage. (Walter Iooss Jr./Sports Illustrated/The MMQB)

The Broncos’ offense line, far and away the best pass-blocking unit in the league this season (helped by Manning’s quick release of the ball), was thoroughly dominated by the Seahawks.

On third down after Chancellor’s hit on Demaryius Thomas, Seahawks end Cliff Avril drove right tackle Orlando Franklin straight back and forced Manning to move off his spot and throw early. Seattle’s four-man nickel defensive line of Avril, Clinton McDonald, Chris Clemons and Michael Bennett owned the first half. Manning dropped back to pass 23 times. Six times the Broncos ran screens (five coming on their first drive of the second quarter in an admission that they had no answers for the Seattle pass rush), which left 17 true drop-backs. Manning was pressured on 10 of those—nearly 60 percent. Franklin allowed five of the pressures, including four to Avril. Left tackle Chris Clark and left guard Zane Beadles each allowed two pressures in the first half. By that point it was 22-0 and the game was all but over.

It’s simple math. The Seahawks don’t send an extra rusher very often because of their well-placed confidence that the line can do the job. When a team can get pressure rushing four against five offensive linemen, that means seven defenders are in coverage against a maximum of five eligible receivers. It’s a huge advantage to the defense, and it’s the same plan of attack the Giants used to defeat the previous single-season record holders for touchdowns and points in a season: the 2007 Patriots in Super Bowl XLII.

If Denver was to beat Seattle, it would have to win the one-on-one battles across the field. Sherman and company made sure that didn’t happen. (Walter Iooss Jr./Sports Illustrated/The MMQB)
If Denver was to beat Seattle, it would have to win the one-on-one battles across the field. Sherman and company made sure that didn’t happen. (Walter Iooss Jr./Sports Illustrated/The MMQB)

Still, it’s amazing that the Broncos’ line, which was so good during the season, was manhandled by the Seahawks, and it wasn’t anything fancy, it was just a man-on-man whipping.

“I’m not sure what exactly happened on the back end [if receivers got open],” Ramirez said. “It doesn’t matter what happened on the back end. We have to make sure as a front five we are blocking no matter who it is or for how long. We need to. All year, Peyton has taken care of us as far as getting rid of the ball quickly, and we have be there for him as well with whatever is happening on the back end. Unfortunately we weren’t able to come up with any kind of offense.”

The Broncos’ myriad issues certainly included Manning. The Seahawks pressure caused him to speed up his game, which is normally a problem for pocket passers like Manning. But he didn’t overcome it as he could have. Manning admitted he made a poor play on the first interception. Yes, he was pressured off his spot when Avril beat Franklin, but Julius Thomas wasn’t open, and Manning sailed the ball to Chancellor. He misfired on a few balls, and threw to well-covered receivers when there were other options available.

The collapse extended to special teams, which got overaggressive on the opening kickoff of the second half; Harvin took it to the house to make the score 29-0. (John Iacono/Sports Illustrated/The MMQB)
The collapse extended to special teams, which got overaggressive on the opening kickoff of the second half; Harvin took it to the house to make the score 29-0. (John Iacono/Sports Illustrated/The MMQB)

With 8:18 left in the first half, Manning threw deep incomplete to Demaryius Thomas against Earl Thomas and Richard Sherman. Julius Thomas was breaking free to the right side of the field. Then later, in what was a possible game-changing play with 1:06 on 4th-and-2 at the Seattle 19-yard line and the score 22-0, Manning threw incomplete to the sideline when Julius Thomas was wide open underneath, right in front of Manning, for the first down.

To complete the total team meltdown, Denver’s kickoff coverage team got overaggressive and out of their lanes on the short kick to start the second half, and Harvin returned it 87 yards for a touchdown. Later, four Broncos defenders had a chance to tackle receiver Jermaine Kearse on a simple 6-yard slant that turned into a 23-yard touchdown to make the score 36-0. The record will also show that the Broncos registered neither a sack nor a quarterback hit on Wilson, who was playing behind the league’s worst pass-blocking unit.

Total dejection. (Gary Bogdon/Sports Illustrated/The MMQB)
Total dejection. (Gary Bogdon/Sports Illustrated/The MMQB)

“I think we played a great football team,” Manning said. “We needed to play really well in order to win, and we didn’t come anywhere close to that. Give Seattle a lot of credit. They are an excellent football team, and they caused a lot of our mistakes. At the same time, we just didn’t play well tonight.”

The Seahawks played and coached a terrific football game in every phase and are rightfully the Super Bowl champions. The Broncos—all of them, not just Manning—did not, and were tattooed with a 35-point loss. That may not grab a lot of headlines today, but that’s what happened in Super Bowl XLVIII.

It could be worse: She could be taking New Jersey transit home. (Gary Bogdon/Sports Illustrated/The MMQB)
It could be worse: She could be taking New Jersey transit home. (Gary Bogdon/Sports Illustrated/The MMQB)

mmqb-end-slug-square

125 comments
expsly12345
expsly12345

This says it all -

“There’s nothing special about what we do, nothing tricky. We play Seahawks football, that’s all. And that means just doing it (the basics) better, faster, harder, than anyone else. You already know what we’re going to do.” – Doug Baldwin

christianjones54
christianjones54

How about a history lesson.  

At first, John Elway enters the staff of being Vice President of football operations in Denver.  He signs Tim Tebow.  Then after losing hope with Kyle Orton, Tebow rallies behind a struggling Denver offense to finish one of the greatest overtime wins in post-season history.  Only then to lose to New England shortly after in the divisional round.  Then, Manning takes the reigns and leads a prominent team to it's second divisional playoff game from a career ending injury, ending the regular season 13-3.  Then in the divisional round stopped again, this time by a resurgent Ravens team led by the comeback of Ray Lewis.  How did Denver respond after that?  A 49-27 blowout against the Ravens in the season-opening blowout.  From then on Baltimore becomes a shadow of their former glory from losing Lewis, among other factors.  Then Manning leads a not-so-prominent-team back into the playoffs with one of the greatest scoring and passing offenses of all time, ending the regular season again, 13-3.  During that time they knock out an undefeated team known for THEIR defense (Kansas City), in Denver, and then AGAIN in Kansas City.  Keep in mind Denver is doing all of this with one of the worst defenses in the league at the time.  They knock down another AFC West rival in the divisional round of the playoffs, San Diego (but not by a huge margin).  After years and years of losing to the Patriots, Denver finally takes revenge on Brady and his own crumbling team from the year of Tebow, when New England beat Denver twice with 41-23, then again in the postseason 45-10. Now it was Denver's turn to take the AFC Championship game, something New England has been to for the last THREE YEARS.  Now here we are, after a 43-8 blowout from Seattle in the Super Bowl.  Many people will criticize Manning about his inability to win the big one (even though he already has one a Super Bowl before).  And a lot people will ignore the 21 other players on the field that contributed to such loss.  A lot of people will ignore the fact that Denver lost five starters on defense throughout 2013, one of them being Von Miller, who was in second place for being the SACK MASTER of 2012, right behind JJ Watt.  Instead, many people will continue to bash the Broncos like they have been doing for years.  Seattle has what is considered one of the best defenses of all time, and most of those great players are probably going to return for the 2014 season.  But, so is Manning (if his doctor gives him the go-ahead), as well as the rest of the star receivers and running backs.  And most of their lost defensive starters will return as well (including Von Miller hopefully).  Come offseason and the 2014 regular season, Denver will have to come to Seattle and face the Seahawks again (and several other good teams IE Bengals, Patriots, etc.).  We have seen how Denver responded with Manning's first year against New England.  We have seen how Denver responded to Baltimore as the defending world champions.  Denver is yet again in a position to redeem themselves in the following season.  How will they respond to this catastrophe?  If Manning returns (which is very likely), he, and a brand new retuned defense, along with that offense, will be more hungry than ever for a world title.  John Elway is 37-17 (including postseason) as the general manager of the Denver Broncos.  Even though they lost yet another Super Bowl, it does not mean they are finished.  Hell, Elway lost THREE Super Bowls before winning two back-to-back!  Denver is definitely in good hands with him.  The Seahawks are going to host the Broncos this year at home in the regular season, so let's see, exactly, how Denver responds.  Considering the history of the Bronco's franchise from these last three years, believe me when I say, they will respond.  

TonyDickey
TonyDickey

Broncos won'y make it to the SB with Manning, but they are committed to him b/c they paid him so much. The Seahawks showed the rest of the league how to beat him. The question is whether or not Elway has the guts to eat his mistake.

DWJ08
DWJ08

This game was memorably horrible. I knew it was over at 15-0 in the 2nd Quarter when Peyton started to show signs of frustration. But, I don't understand the folks who diminish Peyton Manning. So he doesn't have as many rings as Bradshaw, and Montana, and a handful of other QBs. He's still one of the greatest of all-time and I'm happy that I've seen him play for nearly two decades. As a football fan, I appreciate greatness whether it be five rings, one ring, or no rings.

kingwhat
kingwhat

How embarrassing and pathetic is it Greg, when your former paper is so intimidated by the Patriot's success that they have featured a Hernandez page EVERY DAY SINCE THE SUMMER. Hernandez deserves the full extent of the law, but so does Whitey Bulger and the Globe mentions him about once a month. How revealing and embarrassing.

Jim94
Jim94

The Broncos were outplayed in every aspect of the game, offense, defense, and special teams. The Seattle defense alone outscored the seriously over rated Bronco offense. Equally obvious  they were also seriously out coached. This was not a one off result. If they met ten times the result would be similar in most of the meetings. Manning showed a great deal of class and poise in his post game interview. Much more poise than he displayed in the football game. Granted poise is difficult when a superb defense is neutralizing all of you're offensive weapons. Its no wonder the Seattle team plays with such a chip on its shoulder when the media so clearly underestimates its skill level - perhaps that will change now.

jaydee_007
jaydee_007


"The record will also show that the Broncos registered neither a sack nor a quarterback hit on Wilson, who was playing behind the league’s worst pass-blocking unit."


The Record also shows that the Seahawks played against the 2, 3, 4, and 5 pass defenses in the league;
the Saints, the 49ers, the Panthers and the Packers.  Some of them twice.

JayReardon
JayReardon

I think there are a shitload of hateful armchair quarterback experts here who are mostly imbeciles.  When you make  $18 million a year and win a bunch of awards for doing YOUR job, then you can run your mouths.

bbc
bbc

Biggest GOAT of the game, and no I don't mean Greatest Of All Time, has to be Manning. When the game was still on he threw for 50 yards, 0 TDs and 2 ints (including a pick 6). He padded the stats in the 2nd half when the game was all but over at 36-0 and set a meaningless record for completions in a SB.


Manning got all the credit for the "best offense in the history of NFL" and was being hailed as the "greatest QB of all time" before the game, so it's only fair he shoulders majority of the blame. You can't take all the credit when the team wins and hide behind the team when it fails.

BigKing
BigKing

 When Peyton's team wins, it's all about him - the transcendant Most Valuable Player.  And when his team loses it's always a team loss.  It's always been that way and always will be that way.  The team let him down, the offensive line didn't give him protection, the receivers dropped the ball, the weather sucked.  If he's so valuable how come he can't overcome some of those obstacles once in a while.  The biggest obstacle he's overcome so far is the Rex Grossman's Bears.  

Gs1
Gs1

Just goes to show you why rings matter when talking about the greatest QBs of all time. In Super Bowl XXIV, Montana played against the top D in the NFL (Broncos were #1 D) and put up a 55 burger, and it wasn't even that close. The Broncos also had HOFamer John Elway at QB and a 1,200 yard rusher in Humphrey. Yet Elway threw INTs and Montana threw TDs. One looked like a deer in the headlights, and the other was in complete control.


Same with this game, Manning just never looked comfortable and the rest of the team mirrored him. Yes, the Seahawks had the #1 D in the league, but a QB that is in the conversation about being the greatest needs to WILL his team to win. No matter what happens. The Broncos D played well enough to win this game, at first. The Seahawks offense got great field position because of the Bronco's offense stinking up the joint. Then it snow balled after their D was on the field all day and the dam started to break on that side of the ball too. Is it all on Manning? No, but he could have at least calmed everyone down by putting together some good drives, but he was just as flustered as everyone else. Bad coaching, unprepared team, a QB fluttered and frustrated and then the bottom fell out and the rout was on.

BarryDauphin
BarryDauphin

I think Peyton is over-prepared and not under prepared. During the regular season, his preparation is better than his opponents, because he's so obsessive about it. But in post season, the opponents are more prepared than they typically are during the regular season. He loses some of that advantage. I think Peyton typically performs well because he has mentally rehearsed what he's going to do a hundred times. He knows the contingencies. But I think he is not very good at improvising or dealing with the dynamic flow of the game. He's good at executing his plan but is too rigid in his approach. He can't relax. He probably wants to watch just one more film, as if that's going to make the difference. But watching one more film won't make the difference in the playoffs--he's already watched too many films at that point. Being looser would be better but he's wound tight as a drum.


Peyton also gets other people wound up too. Last night the entire team seemed to be a reflection of him--too tight, unable to adjust to the unexpected, confused and overwhelmed, dear in the headlights-- like the plan isn't working but there is no Plan B. The Broncos did a pretty decent job keeping Lynch in check, but they could't seem to tackle anyone else. The receivers looked apprehensive and timid, except for Welker. 

Red-Stripes
Red-Stripes

The Broncos' offense was exposed as a fraud.  Peynful Manning padded his stats on a cream-puff regular season schedule which saw him face just two top 10 defenses.  Manning is an outstanding quarterback.....but neither he nor that offense are "best ever" anything.......

jtstaley88
jtstaley88

Another choke job by Peyton. The numbers don't lie. He has proven over and over that he cannot play well when the pressure is on.


We should have kept Tebow who knows how to bring his A-game when it matters most.

Macheen
Macheen

Calling this year's Broncos the "Greatest Offense in NFL History" was ridiculous before the Super Bowl and unthinkable after. A simple eyeball test between them and the 1989 49ers would tell you that: Joe Montana, Steve Young (back up), Jerry Rice, John Taylor, Brent Jones, Roger Craig, Tom Rathman, Mike Holmgren (OC). During the playoffs AND the Super Bowl those 49ers moved through the opposition defense like pregame warm-ups.

tdjt
tdjt

40-10 in the preseason. 43-8 in the Superbowl. No one should have been surprised yesterday, but people didn't want to believe should have been pretty obvious.

davidhd
davidhd

@christianjones54  That's a good history lesson, and it illustrates what a competitor Manning is, and what a good organization Denver has been under Elway. As a Seahawks fan, I feel very fortunate that Denver had such a soft schedule prior to the super bowl, playing teams like New England and San Diego, which play soft defense and lack the weapons to score on Denver's weak pass defense. Denver just wasn't prepared for Seattle, and they couldn't be, because they hadn't played any other team that played real, big boy defense all season. We'll see how they respond, but I'm sure it will be a closer game next time. Peyton will be much better prepared for the coverages and pass rush this time, and the Denver coaching staff will actually respect Seattle enough to study film, something it didn't look like they had done before the super bowl, acting like the overwhelming favorite the media claimed they were. I expect a close game next time. 


All that being said, Seattle is a much much better team than Denver right now. Unless that changes drastically in the off season, which is unlikely, Seattle will still have better athletes than Denver across the board, a defense that is built perfectly for stopping Peyton, and a good enough offense to score on Denver's soft secondary. I think it will be a much closer game, but Seattle will still win by at least a touchdown. 


The good news, if you're a Denver fan, is that Denver can beat anyone else in the league right now. Even the 49ers, who many people mistakenly think are the same as Seattle, have a vulnerable secondary and front seven against the pass. Just think back to the Ravens strategy in the super bowl win over them. Flacco picked apart that defense, even though the Ravens struggled in the run game. Peyton could have the same type of success against SF, and he probably will. Unless Seattle makes the super bowl again, the Broncos could win it all next season. I'm hoping for a Seahawks repeat next year, and it's certainly possible, but it's not easy to get back to the big game.

expsly12345
expsly12345

This says it all -

“There’s nothing special about what we do, nothing tricky. We play Seahawks football, that’s all. And that means just doing it (the basics) better, faster, harder, than anyone else. You already know what we’re going to do.” – Doug Baldwin (WR)

PhillipHermes
PhillipHermes

@TonyDickey They could the Broncos just didn't show up to the super bowl it wasn't the same team the whole season especially on the kick return for the second quarter our defense stoped running at the 60 yard line. Its not manning fault even he knew it wasn't the same team from last game.

Crapahoola
Crapahoola

@TonyDickey  So all you have to do is rush him with four guys, have a big physical safety, and have the best cornerback on the planet.  Seems simple enough.  Can't figure out why the other 31 teams don't do that against him.


And I guess the Patriot's should get rid of Brady, since he didn't even make it to the Super Bowl.

minilabsforever
minilabsforever

@Jim94  Please understand that THE MEDIA DOES NOT REPRESENT THE PLAYER. If the media has an opinion or a favorite player that DOES NOT mean that the player feels that way. Getting real tired of these dumbass comments

MichaelMcKinley
MichaelMcKinley

@jaydee_007 AND had two of their Offensive line starters out for half the season, starting instead a low draft choice AND a free agent.  Also we faced the Rams who had a monster rush twice.

AaronDunckel
AaronDunckel

@JayReardon yet another dumb comment that says "if you aren't doing the same thing, you can't criticize.  This is inane babble.  So you can't criticize Manning because you aren't making $18 million?  I can't criticize senators, congressmen, or the president because Im not an elected official?   Pedestrian argument.

jack.moskovita
jack.moskovita

@bbc  Peyton had protection all year except for the two times they played the Hawks.

How is that his fault? I don't blame Peyton, I blame the whole team.

I'm from the NW and big Hawk fan.

UlisseP
UlisseP

@BigKing You're right, the way Peyton missed tackles while playing on special teams, or the fact that he didn't put any pressure on Wilson while playing defense, was truly embarrassing. How dare people call him great?

DanSlaughter
DanSlaughter

@Gs1 ...Denver DID NOT have the best defense league that season Minnesota did. Kansas City also had a better defense than Denver that season and the 49ers had a top 5 defense to go along with that #1 offense. Get your facts straight.

GoHAWKS!
GoHAWKS!

@jtstaley88 WOW....To bad Manning doesn't have more fans like Seahawks 12th man.  Crappy fan-you add to the frustration of your team. You kick them when they're down.  This was probably the worst game of Mannings career and he will always have that hanging over him and you want to rub salt in that wound! What a piece of #*&@! We love our Hawks and cheer for them no matter what. You're a joke of a fan. JERK!


GO HAWKS! WE LOVE YOU!

GoHAWKS!
GoHAWKS!

@jtstaley88 And there's the difference between Seahawks fans and you.  We stand behind our guys and build them up...not kick them when they're down.  This was probably the worst game of Mannings career and he will always have that hanging over his head. To bad for him that he doesn't have more fans like Seattle's 12th man. Poor sport...kicking your players when they're down.  BooHoo. What a piece of @#*&!!!.....


GO HAWKS!!!  WE LOVE YOU!!!



DanSlaughter
DanSlaughter

@jtstaley88 ...ah yes.....Tebow winner of 7 regular season games, 1 playoff game and.....nothing else in the NFL. If Tebow knows how to bring the "A" game,,,we gotta wonder why he isn't even in the NFL anymore? Wonder why he never started for another team after the Broncos? Tebow doesn't have a Super Bowl ring, AFC Titles, multiple division titles or much else. This is the NFL...not college football. Have another wine cooler.

jack.moskovita
jack.moskovita

@jtstaley88  Yep, both the 49ers & Broncos blew it by letting their QB's go.

I hope the Hawks pick up Tebow as a backup or to play in the red zone where Wilson seems to have trouble this year.

WCoastPro
WCoastPro

@jtstaley88  Yeah I'm sure Mr Tebow would have totally feasted on this Seahawks defense. Probably would have been 35-38 passing, 5 TDS, 0 INTs, 316 yards. (with 3 drops by Thomas) and 157 yards rushing and 2 more TDs.  Denver would have won 52-28.  

First71
First71

@jtstaley88 Give it a dang rest with Tebow , your way out of line, Seattle played a fantastic game and for you to grovel about a player who will never play in the league again is ridiculous . Show some respect to your team if you are really a fan and accept the Seahawks were the better team.

riley8
riley8

@jtstaley88  I contend that it didn't matter who was under center for the Broncos.  They would have been beaten and beaten badly last night.  By my estimation Manning did NOT choke.  Sometimes the better teams win the games whether or not people think choking is involved.

genewatcher
genewatcher

@Macheen  I think that it is very safe to say that the league back then did NOT have a swarming defense like the Seahawks......they dominated because they are EXTREMELY athletic.....by scoring the most points in a season, you have claimed the "best" offense just on the fact that NOBODY HAS EVER DONE IT!!!

m0m0
m0m0

@tdjt I'm quite surprised that nobody mentioned the preseason score in their analysis. But I took that score as a practice game fluke. Apparently not.

davidhd
davidhd

@Crapahoola @TonyDickey  you're one of the few who seems to get it. Seattle is the only team in the league with a historically good pass defense, and Denver would have beat every other NFC team with the same strategy they rolled out in the super bowl. The genius of Pete Carroll's current coaching tenure is that he built the perfect defense for stopping the modern passing game.  

AaronDunckel
AaronDunckel

@jack.moskovita @bbc There were others at  fault for sure, but Peyton looks average and overmatched for the moment.  There is no denying that. 

orovillehawk
orovillehawk

@jack.moskovita @bbc  you are right! the Broncos remembered pre season. Seattle was too fast for them. Having no huddle really hurt the Broncos....hurry up just put them farther behind> smash mouth working class football...that's why we love these Seahawks. the sweetest thing is that 49ers know that if they hadnt LOST they would be CHAMPS! sleep on that boys

AaronDunckel
AaronDunckel

@UlisseP @BigKing You can't excuse his super bowl performance!  When the game was still on the line in the first half, he was abysmal.  He looked like a 2nd stringer, not an all-time great.  If you want to take the credit for winning, then take it for losing as well. 

FranciscoHinojosa
FranciscoHinojosa

Peyton Manning and his #1 Offense put up 8 points in the Super Bowl. Seahawks Special teams and Defense put up 14. Russell Wilson didn't even have to step on the field to win this game! Shame on The Legendary Peyton Manning and his Great Legacy!

Go Seahawks!

chris6
chris6

@jack.moskovita @Gs1  sorry your post does not refute what Gs1 said. Any quarterback can play well if he has great protection. A great quarterback adjusts to what the defense is doing, and sometimes that even is not enough. Peyton gets all the credit for being a coach on the field and for calling his own plays. So he deserves blame for when the team plays flat out awful. 

Jim94
Jim94

@jack.moskovita @jtstaley88I admire Tebow's heart, effort, and attitude but when every team in the nfl takes a pass on employing him you've just gotta conclude that the skill set is not there at that level. It's either that or every team is wrong a most unlikely conclusion.

AaronDunckel
AaronDunckel

@riley8 @jtstaley88 while I disagree with Tebow, you can't seriously say Manning didn't chock... I mean come on, did you watch that 1st half? 

DanSlaughter
DanSlaughter

@m0m0 @tdjtPeople did. Peyton had 123 QB rating going 11 for 16, 163 yards and 1 TD in ONE QUARTER of play in that preseason game. He hit all of his receivers once and moved the ball with ease. So it was easy to wonder what he would do with an entire 60 minutes.

Newsletter